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Just starting on this ride...

Eogz

Registered User
Sep 9, 2021
21
0
Hi,
I'm a younger person (50) experiencing some cognitive issues, I'm at the very start of this, though the issues have been around for a few years and very slowly getting worse.
I noticed them myself more in the last 2 years, with some arthritic/pain issues, mostly my cognitive stuff I put down to issues with pain management, stress at work and life.
My issues are slight memory problems (names (not family), losing things, organising and planning, apathy/tiredness, some coordination (very mild)).
We bought a house in November, it has low doorways and beams, if I'm walking through, no problems at all, If I am in anyway distracted, tired or have anything on my mind, Bang, I'm hitting my head). A few times now, I've missed or completely taken the wrong slip road off the motorway. These are a few examples.
I spoke to my GP about a year ago and got nowhere, I was told not to worry about it.
A year later we had the same discussion and he ordered general blood tests, nothing came up at all, I'm healthy. Initially the GP was going to end it there, he felt that pain management may have something to do with a slight cognitive decline, losing weight and exercise would help...
I said fine, but I would keep a diary and again emphasised the symptoms I've experienced above and how unusual they were for me to experience them.
30 mins after the call, he rang back and agreed that these could be early signs of dementia or something else. I agreed that it was a concern and he has agreed to refer me to the memory clinic and for a CT Scan.
As much as I don't want a diagnosis, I do want to know what is going on, my partner notices it as did my sister who visited for a weekend a few weeks ago.
But it is all so mild and difficult to define.
I'm struggling with work, but they are also understanding so have patience with me, which is great.
I'm keeping a diary of all events of note for when I do see someone.
Is there anything else I can be doing that will help and hopefully avoid me being fobbed off?
No appointment yet for the scan or the memory clinic, so I'm happily waiting, it's just a worry.
I know something is wrong, my thinking is really fuzzy and though still able to do al most everything, I really have to think twice and make sure I am carefully considering every action at times.
I'm grateful for any advice and thoughts you might have. Apologies for the long post.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
74,138
0
Kent
Welcome to Talking Point @Eogz . There is no need to apologise for your long post you have given a very comprehensive summary of your concerns.

I think you are doing everything you can by keeping a note of where you think you are going wrong.

All I can suggest is you keep a detailed diary during 24 hours and log the time and date and then do another a couple of days later.

It took a year for my husband to get a diagnosis even though we asked our GP on a regular basis and had face to face appointments not hampered by covid.

He was treated for depression and other suspicions were eliminated before he was sent for a scan.

I can understand how frustrating it is for you especially if family members are noticing something happening.

There will be a lot of support for you here. Members are generous at sharing their experiences so I hope this will help.
 

Eogz

Registered User
Sep 9, 2021
21
0
Welcome to Talking Point @Eogz . There is no need to apologise for your long post you have given a very comprehensive summary of your concerns.

I think you are doing everything you can by keeping a note of where you think you are going wrong.

All I can suggest is you keep a detailed diary during 24 hours and log the time and date and then do another a couple of days later.

It took a year for my husband to get a diagnosis even though we asked our GP on a regular basis and had face to face appointments not hampered by covid.

He was treated for depression and other suspicions were eliminated before he was sent for a scan.

I can understand how frustrating it is for you especially if family members are noticing something happening.

There will be a lot of support for you here. Members are generous at sharing their experiences so I hope this will help.
 

Eogz

Registered User
Sep 9, 2021
21
0
Thanks @Grannie G,

Your reply was much appreciated and I will stick to a diary and keep record of my concerns. I don't have severe symptoms, they are all low key, but I know something is up.
Too many years working with people who have issues makes me more aware of my own.
Thanks again, the support is much appreciated.
 

DreamsAreReal

Registered User
Oct 17, 2015
110
0
@Eogz The things you’ve described sound very similar to what I call brain fog, mine is caused by side effects of a prescription drug. It could be any number of things, so not necessarily dementia. I hope it turns out to be something treatable, best of luck to you.
 

Eogz

Registered User
Sep 9, 2021
21
0
@Eogz The things you’ve described sound very similar to what I call brain fog, mine is caused by side effects of a prescription drug. It could be any number of things, so not necessarily dementia. I hope it turns out to be something treatable, best of luck to you.
Thanks for the reply, you may well be right. The only medication I take is a PPI Omeprazole, but I take it sparingly thought it's a necessary evil, I have sever GERD.
It does have a loose connection to cognitive issues, something I hadn't thought about until your reply.
So many thanks for that.
 

DesperateofDevon

Registered User
Jul 7, 2019
3,240
0
Hi,
I'm a younger person (50) experiencing some cognitive issues, I'm at the very start of this, though the issues have been around for a few years and very slowly getting worse.
I noticed them myself more in the last 2 years, with some arthritic/pain issues, mostly my cognitive stuff I put down to issues with pain management, stress at work and life.
My issues are slight memory problems (names (not family), losing things, organising and planning, apathy/tiredness, some coordination (very mild)).
We bought a house in November, it has low doorways and beams, if I'm walking through, no problems at all, If I am in anyway distracted, tired or have anything on my mind, Bang, I'm hitting my head). A few times now, I've missed or completely taken the wrong slip road off the motorway. These are a few examples.
I spoke to my GP about a year ago and got nowhere, I was told not to worry about it.
A year later we had the same discussion and he ordered general blood tests, nothing came up at all, I'm healthy. Initially the GP was going to end it there, he felt that pain management may have something to do with a slight cognitive decline, losing weight and exercise would help...
I said fine, but I would keep a diary and again emphasised the symptoms I've experienced above and how unusual they were for me to experience them.
30 mins after the call, he rang back and agreed that these could be early signs of dementia or something else. I agreed that it was a concern and he has agreed to refer me to the memory clinic and for a CT Scan.
As much as I don't want a diagnosis, I do want to know what is going on, my partner notices it as did my sister who visited for a weekend a few weeks ago.
But it is all so mild and difficult to define.
I'm struggling with work, but they are also understanding so have patience with me, which is great.
I'm keeping a diary of all events of note for when I do see someone.
Is there anything else I can be doing that will help and hopefully avoid me being fobbed off?
No appointment yet for the scan or the memory clinic, so I'm happily waiting, it's just a worry.
I know something is wrong, my thinking is really fuzzy and though still able to do al most everything, I really have to think twice and make sure I am carefully considering every action at times.
I'm grateful for any advice and thoughts you might have. Apologies for the long post.
I have M.E & have similar cognitive issues
 

Eogz

Registered User
Sep 9, 2021
21
0
I have M.E & have similar cognitive issues
Hi, I'm open to it being anything at the moment.
The GP saying that it does reflect early stage cognitive issues spurred me on to looking around for info.
Sorry to hear about your ME, one of the little understood or empathised conditions. A colleague at work has ME and she struggles massively with it.
We've had some good chats about cognitive issues and she was the first person I disclosed my concerns to.
 

Violet Jane

Registered User
Aug 23, 2021
127
0
Could this be connected to the Menopause? You are the right age. A lot of women report brain fog / cognitive issues and find that HRT helps with this. Someone on another thread about young onset dementia talked about this.
 

Eogz

Registered User
Sep 9, 2021
21
0
Could this be connected to the Menopause? You are the right age. A lot of women report brain fog / cognitive issues and find that HRT helps with this. Someone on another thread about young onset dementia talked about this.
I'm the wrong sex though... 🤣
Regardless this gave me such a good chuckle this morning.
 

DesperateofDevon

Registered User
Jul 7, 2019
3,240
0
Hi, I'm open to it being anything at the moment.
The GP saying that it does reflect early stage cognitive issues spurred me on to looking around for info.
Sorry to hear about your ME, one of the little understood or empathised conditions. A colleague at work has ME and she struggles massively with it.
We've had some good chats about cognitive issues and she was the first person I disclosed my concerns to.
I have M.E brain fog triggered by stress, tiredness, emotional upset & often feel as if I’m battling to get words out. Other days I’m fine 20+ years of being told I’m talking gibberish by folks who have no concept of an invisible disability