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Just saw this bit of news

Sandy

Registered User
Mar 23, 2005
6,847
Thanks for that link Lila13.

When these interesting bits of research information appear in the news, I always like to go and read the Alzheimer's Society's interpretation. Stories that can be a bit sensationalised in the regular press are put into perspectives that people with dementia and their loved ones can perhaps appreciate a bit more.

The Society, and its web team, seem to be doing this on a regular basis, and I for one do find this incredibly useful.

Here is their "take" on the yahoo news story:

http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/Research/Research_in_the_news/300407_refinding_lost_memories.htm

Take care,

Sandy
 

Brucie

Registered User
Jan 31, 2004
12,413
near London
I find this an interesting story and it relates somewhat to the workings of computers....

Our computer's hard disk contains many files, scattered all over the place. The key to the precise location of each file is contained in a special data table that is separate from the files themselves. In effect, when we want to open a file, the computer goes to the phone directory [that table], looks up the name, and 'rings' the number - goes to the location where it is held.

When we delete a file, the information is not lost immediately. The entry in the table is simply changed so it does not show in the phone directory - in practice it becomes ex-directory to all except specialist rescue programs. But the data is still on the disk, at least until it is replaced by something else, partially, or completely.

To try to get back to a 'deleted' file, we can use specialist software. It may or it may not work, depending how recently the file was deleted, and also whether some of the file space has already been used.

If in this research they have found a way of providing a specialist program for the human brain that enables it to identify where this or that memory is - or was - then it would be good.

... just awaiting a PC specialist who will correct some of the above, though I believe it is broadly correct - we used similar techniques on mainframe computers in the 1970s to regain lost files.
 

RussellC

Registered User
Jul 6, 2006
47
I found this research interesting.

Even when my Dad was in the late stages of AD I felt that there was more awareness in him than was apparent from his poor verbal skills. I always used to listen to what he said and there were occasional clues to give it sense and meaning. Earlier on in the illness he was definitely helped by attending a day centre. His condition noticeably improved.

More research is definitely needed. It may lead to more imaginative and sensitive treatment options for dementia.

Best wishes


Russell
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
I wish they'd also do more research on the effect of music for recovering "lost" memories. My mother, and from what I read here, a lot of other people, have a surprising ability to recall music, even when other memories are lost. I know that music uses different parts of the brain: there was a case of someone who completely lost his short term memory following an accident but could still play instruments and compose.

Jennifer
 

Skye

Registered User
Aug 29, 2006
17,000
SW Scotland
John lost the ability to read and write very early, but until last year could still paint beautiful water colours, with perfect perspective. Sadly, even that's gone now.
 

youngest_son

Registered User
Oct 15, 2005
21
Yorkshire
Jennifer - I remember reading this article regarding song http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4448634.stm

Bruce - People say I'm a bit of a PC specialist (I run my own computer repair business) and you are correct in what you say about the workings so none of your information needs correcting :D we just need to find that specialist program and spread it widely.
 

Brucie

Registered User
Jan 31, 2004
12,413
near London
youngest son said:
People say I'm a bit of a PC specialist
I try never to admit to 25 year's using and supporting PCs as it is for sure that someone will ask me to use my skills to help them...just as a friend, of course [ie no £££] Since you run a business, it works in your favour!;)
 

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