1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. MartyC

    MartyC Registered User

    Jan 2, 2016
    6
    Hello group. I am a professional carer, working in the Bournemouth area with people with dementia, of various stages. However, I am now faced with a dilemma concerning my father whose mental health has deteriorated quite rapidly over the past 8 to 10 months. I organised for my dad to visit the doctor about another health issue, but phoned in advance to ask the doctor if she would test dad for dementia whilst he was there. She agreed to do this but informed me that she would not be permitted to divulge the findings, because of data protection. When I spoke to dad the following day, he could hardly remember going to see his doctor, let-alone what he had gone for. I wonder if somebody could tell me what the procedure is for a relative finding out whether or not his/her loved one has this illness. If dad won’t tell me and the doctor won’t, how can I find out? Many thanks. MartyC
     
  2. MartyC

    MartyC Registered User

    Jan 2, 2016
    6
    Maybe should have mentioned....dad is 88 years old.
     
  3. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,417
    Would your father be willing to sign a letter to the GP telling her that he would like her to share his health information with you? That's the most straightforward fastest way.
     
  4. MartyC

    MartyC Registered User

    Jan 2, 2016
    6
    Unfortunately, my dad can be quite awkward and hates the idea that people would think him stupid if he were diagnosed as having a illness of the mind. We know that is not the case but that is how he sees it. I have spoken to him about dementia but he always tells me how he can still do the crosswords and codewords in his paper. He is always quick to point out that he was tested for dementia 4 years ago and he was fine. He didn't know that the doctor was testing him for that whilst he was there, this time, and I'm not even certain that she did, because I have no way of knowing.
     
  5. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,740
    I wonder what the GP would say if you said you just needed to know if she had made a referral because you support him to get to an appointment and he will just put any appointment letter or phone call to one side and won't turn up?

    Do you have Power of Attorney? Worth considering - you can do it online for a fraction of the cost of a solicitor
     
  6. lin1

    lin1 Registered User

    Jan 14, 2010
    9,322
    Female
    East Kent
    #6 lin1, Jan 2, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016
    Hi. We have a letter lodged with the GP where my Dad has given permission to discuss everything including treatment with me, it is best to add something like this can only be revoked by me in writing.
    Maybe Dad would find it more acceptable that having his permission, would make it possible for you to speak to the GP on his behalf if it was inconvenient for him to do so, rather than mentioning memory problems or Dementia, my apologies if you have already tried things like that.

    My Dad doesn't have Dementia.
    I wrote the letter and Dad signed it.
    I have found it invaluable, both with the GPs and the receptionists, the receptionists were quite rightly wary of discussing my Dad with me, results of tests etc, now it's seldom I have a problem with them and when I do , I just mention that permission should be on the computer. If you are able persuade Dad, I suggest you do several copies so you can give them to other professionals and for just in case.

    I highly recommend you try to get both the finance & property LPA (lasting power of attorney) and the health and welfare one, I will put a link to the official site in a mo,
    I did Dads online as he is not good with computers and found it very easy plus a lot cheaper than going through a solicitor, but if your Dad is unwilling their is nothing you can do till it's decided he doesn't have capacity.
    https://www.gov.uk/power-of-attorney/overview
     
  7. MartyC

    MartyC Registered User

    Jan 2, 2016
    6
    #7 MartyC, Jan 2, 2016
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016
    Hi, Many thanks for your quick reply.....No, I don't yet have p.o.a but dad has agreed to look into it with me so I don't think that would be a problem. I will follow up on your suggestions. Thanks again. Martin
     
  8. MartyC

    MartyC Registered User

    Jan 2, 2016
    6
    I highly recommend you try to get both the finance & property LPA (lasting power of attorney) and the health and welfare one, I will put a link to the official site in a mo,
    I did Dads online as he is not good with computers and found it very easy plus a lot cheaper than going through a solicitor, but
    if your Dad is unwilling their is nothing you can do till it's decided he doesn't have capacity.


    Hi, Many thanks for your reply..... my dad and I will look again at P.O.A. next week. I will follow up on your suggestions also....I'm sure he would agree to the letter idea. Thank you again for your help. Martin
     
  9. Spiro

    Spiro Registered User

    Mar 11, 2012
    522
    The H & W POA is invaluable should your Dad ever need to go into hospital.

    I can thoroughly recommend this book - Dementia The One-Stop Guide by Professor June Andrews.
    http://juneandrews.net/about/

    You may know a lot of the information, but caring for a family member is a different scenario.
     
  10. MartyC

    MartyC Registered User

    Jan 2, 2016
    6
    Thank you so much for the recommendation. Kind regards
     

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