1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. vicky

    vicky Registered User

    Dec 24, 2006
    5
    wales
    hi im vicky and my nan was diagnosed with alzheimers several years ago now and as it has progressed see has become worse, moreso in the last year. i have heard that the later stages alzheimers can cause the airways to narrow, i was wondering how common this is? and if it does occur in the last stages?
     
  2. abby

    abby Registered User

    Dec 19, 2006
    182
    West Country
    Hi..

    I am a newbie also....I can't answer your question but I am sure someone will be along soon who can

    Welcome anyway...tis a great site.....I have been helped more than I could of hoped for.

    Abby
    x
     
  3. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,417
    Hi Vicky
    Welcome to TP

    Have you looked at the factsheets (top left corner of your screen i Factsheets)? There is a lot of information there, although this is not a specific symptom that I have heard of (which means nothing, of course). I'm not sure why AD, as it is a brain disease, should cause this sort of problem - I've heard of swallowing difficulties but thats something else.

    Jennifer
     
  4. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    Seeing that the brain control all are organs in our body , I can understand why that would or could happen ,
     
  5. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,672
    Kent
    Hi Vicky,
    I don`t think anyone can give you a definite answer re the progression of Alzheimers. It really seems to depend on which areas of the brain are affected, to understand which organs of the body are affected in turn.
    Some people deteriorate very quickly, while with others it is very slow. You also have the additional wear and tear of the body to take into consideration, and whether there are any other illnesses, like diabetes, heart problems, etc. to affect the progression of Alzheimers.
    So sorry you can`t get a definite answer. Sylvia x
     
  6. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #6 Margarita, Dec 24, 2006
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2006
    just wondering asking something that always been in the back of my mind , but I always thought from reading up on AZ and what
    AZ nurse , memory clinic nurse tell me
    that it does not affect part of the brain , but the whole brain . I thouht its not like epilepsies that only effect part of the brain !!



    the whole brain shrinks shutting it all down, then yes if you
    ,

    you don't live to long for the disease to go full blown , but then if you have all medication under control for diabetes , heart problems



    You can still live a long time , till the
    diseases take over the whole brain , it depends really on the care you receive , in being look after taking medication for other heath problems , that the person may have




    so if you don’t have
    you can live a long life till the disease slowly take over and shrinks shuts down the whole brain , if other parts of your body is healthy .


    PS more power to the carer who does not go into denial of it all and face the reality of it all with they love one.

    To anyone that has AZ and is reading this I hope I have not upset you saying the above xx
     
  7. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,672
    Kent
    I know Alzheimers affects the whole brain, but the progress seems to be different.

    My husband`s main difficulties, so far, are short term memory and movement. He has lost no language or understanding of language, but his logic has gone. His whole body is slowly stiffening and his movement is shaky.

    There are some times, on good days, when I think he has a long way to go.
    Other times, I feel his life is seeping away.

    Alzheimers or dementia is affected by circulation problems. When I first consulted our GP, he considered my husband`s memory loss could be due to poor circulation from the Diabetes. I just feel that those with problems in that area are more likely to develop more severe problems, more quickly.
    Sylvia
     
  8. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,417
    Yes, but what Vicky seems to be describing is a physical narrowing of the airways - I don't quite see how AD or any other brain damage would do this. Having said that, I suppose that certain types of brain damage (brain stem injuries?) can affect the breathing, but I thought that was more to do with the brain forgetting how to breathe, rather than a change in the airways.

    Jennifer
     
  9. nicetotalk

    nicetotalk Registered User

    Sep 22, 2006
    155
    stretford
    Hi Vicky

    Ive not heard that befor about the narrowing of the airways,maybe someone on hear has. I do know that at the very late stage of alzheimers they find it difficult to eat or drink. Not sure if its because they forget or just another function of the body closing down.

    kathy
     
  10. perfectpatience

    perfectpatience Registered User

    Oct 3, 2006
    64
    Essex
    Re. Airways shutting down

    A few years ago when we realised something was wrong with my mother...though even after endless visits to the doctor...didnt know what.....I noticed that the first signs apart from her 'shuffling' when she walked and not reading books anymore....was her lack of drinking. Following that usually caused her to keep getting urine infections...and then dehydration. Confusion followed...loss of weight....more infections....etc etc. The last two years and her eating was always a problem. I was wondering myself if the airways sort of closed down gradually with this disease. When my mum passed away (5th Dec) she weighed four stone...and even pureed food was hard for her to swallow. I too would be interested to know whether a 'closing of airways' might start happening at first stages.....hence all the other complications that go with this vile disease...then follows... Love PP xx
     
  11. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,672
    Kent
    I know this is all conjecture but could this not be `shutting down of the airways`, but loss of muscle tone.
     
  12. vicky

    vicky Registered User

    Dec 24, 2006
    5
    wales
    Re: perfect patience

    im sorry to hear about your mum. it is also hard for my nan to eat pureed food, and she has lost a lot of weight in the last few weeks. she has difficulty taking her tablets including aricept, the hospital have now taken her off all medication and she is on gas and air.... so i dont really know what will happen now, although she is still fighting :) xx
     
  13. perfectpatience

    perfectpatience Registered User

    Oct 3, 2006
    64
    Essex
    Re. Your nan

    Sorry to hear your nan is not eating Vicky, I do know exactly what you must be going through.....just be strong..and take it day by day. My mum went downhill very quick....but others that were at the same stage as my mum are still alive and relatively well. Always post on t/p when you want or feel you need advice. It has always helped me so much. Best wishes...Love PP xx
     
  14. JT13

    JT13 Registered User

    Aug 9, 2006
    41
    Hi Vicky,

    Your posting caught my attention so I went on to read online and ask my doctor friends. Although I can't represent what doctors say, what I've heard is that Alzheimers doesn't cause the airways to narrow. However, old age is the most viable reason for that to happen.

    An abstract from The American Society of Anesthesiologists (Geriatrics):

    "Physiologically, aging also affects the respiratory system with decreases in responsiveness to hypercapnia, and often with hypoxia due to decreased carotid and aortic body sensitivities. There is an increase in chest wall rigidity, chest wall compliance and muscle strength. Also, as the airway from the nose to the terminal bronchi become more narrow or stiff, there is a decrease in the exchange of gas. The lung parenchyma contains three important gas exchange structures: 1) alveolar, the gas exchange airways distal to the terminal bronchioles, 2) capillary bed and 3) the interstitial structure of the lung (elastic recoil). Under normal situations, the distal airways maintain patent by the elastic recoil forces of the surrounding lung parenchyma. The forces that hold intraparenchymal airways (small airways) open will therefore decrease as the aging lung loses its elastic recoil due to thickening of parenchyma. The thickening of parenchyma will also decrease gas exchange between the alveolar and capillary bed. There is ventilation perfusion mismatching and decreased arterial oxygen.

    The respiratory system is also affected by environmental changes, including smoke, dust, air pollution, etc. Respiratory diseases include emphysema, dyspnea, and hypoxia."

    Hence, it may be possible to conclude that narrow airways is one of the many changes exhibited in a person who is aging (unless IF she has Asthma).
     
  15. nicetotalk

    nicetotalk Registered User

    Sep 22, 2006
    155
    stretford
    JT 13

    You say old age is the most viable my mum was 62 when she passed i would not say her age was old age. While doctors can say this and that i dont think anyone has the true answers to this terrible illness. When we brought my mum in to hospital we knew the end was near a doctor said to us who diagnosed alzheimers we gave the specilists name i asked why she had said that. Her reply was she is to young to get alzheimers well after being on here and realizing that the young can get this illness it makes me wonder just how much the doctors know themselves. This was only in march, maybe they need to come on to hear and read a few posts alzheimers is not just an old age thing. Its devestating especialy when a l;oved one is diaganosed young

    kathy
     
  16. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia


    Hi Sylvia,
    Your husband sounds very like my Mum - I hope you don't mind me making the comparisons but as you say, the progress is different in different people. I find it helpful to know someone else is seeing a similar pattern to the one I see in Mum. She can still play Scrabble! and beat me more often than not! - but she can't remember what she told you at the beginning of a sentence, let alone a conversation. Also her logic is not reliable altho' she has some days when it seems finne! On other days she is "haywire"!

    Does your husband perseverate on certain topics? (ie. get one thing on his mind and sem unable to move off it for a few days, or even weeks?) Mum gets something on her mind and thentalks about it continually until she forgets.This can be a few days, but can last longer. Topics include my husband's cataract operation (!!???), one grandson's Christmas present (but no-one else's - in a family of 4 children with spouses, and 10 grandchildren!!!) and my Dad's socks (he passed away in October). :confused: We have no idea what causes her to get "stuck" on certain topics - and I haven't heard other people mention it. Is it common???

    Regards, Nell.
     
  17. JT13

    JT13 Registered User

    Aug 9, 2006
    41
    Dear Kathy,

    Good to hear from you. I'm sorry that your mum at such a young age has Alzheimer's. You're correct, it is a very young age to get such a nasty desease.

    However, when I wrote in reply to Vicky, my post was to mention that the "narrowing of airways" most likely is not in relation or caused by Alzheimer's. Similarly to Arthritis and other symptoms, these may be related to Old Age and not Alzheimer's. Hence, is not in correlation with Alzheimer's.

    As for your doctor, he/she is most likely comparing your mum's age to the average age of Alzheimer's patients. We all here do read and realise that Alzheimer's CAN find their victims who are young and not even turned 50 years old.

    Hope this clears things up.

    By the way, a Very Happy 2007 to everyone and keep up the strength and perseverance for a great year ahead.

     
  18. nicetotalk

    nicetotalk Registered User

    Sep 22, 2006
    155
    stretford
    JT 13

    thanx for that and happy new year

    kathy
     
  19. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #19 Margarita, Dec 26, 2006
    Last edited: Dec 26, 2006
    Sylvia My mother also has diabetic,but is on tablets only,
    I find only that her movement from getting up from a chair is not very steady and gets confused in how to lie down get up , seem her balance is all confused also .

    Sorry Sylvia I was so long winged in what I said . made a fool of myself,
    I let my emotion get in the way
    seem it was something personnel to myself that I need to of load


    Yes like my mother also Logic has gone


    ps Nell
    Oh yes Strangle I find that also with my mother
     
  20. mocha

    mocha Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    176
    Lancs, England
    age

    I used to work in a Care Home where the youngest resident with Alzheimer's was 46. When you think that quite often they have been showing symptoms for a year or so before diagnosis that makes her around 44.
    My husband was just 68 when it was finally said that he had AZ. I would say around 66 when symptoms started.
     

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