1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. Hi all as you know ive started the process to get mum moved, But now and then i wonder how this illness goes i ask myself has mum got years,months,weeks and it tortures me its the not knowing that gets to me does anyone else feel this way sometimes ????


    Hope your all well

    Mark
     
  2. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Mark, I think we all feel the same about that!

    Everyone is different, and the disease lasts for different lengths of time for each of us.

    When the person you are caring for reaches end stage, you think they won't be with you for much longer, but end stage can last for weeks, months or years. And the constant ups and downs are very wearing on the nerves.

    Sorry I can't be more encouraging. It's hard, and don't let anyone tell you different. But many of us are suffering with you.

    Love,
     
  3. Lynne

    Lynne Registered User

    Jun 3, 2005
    3,433
    Suffolk,England
    Feel much the same, Mark

    It's the not knowing, it adds to the feeling of being in a state of limbo doesn't it. You can't do any of the normal planning ahead with any confidence, as things can stay the same for a long time and then, suddenly, lurch into panic mode again.

    On the one hand the child in us (albeit grown-up) wants Mum or Dad to be with us for ever, because they always have been.
    They are a hugely pivotal part of us, and of our lives. We don't want to think about the vacuum they will leave when they die.
    On the other hand it's torture to watch them deteriorate & suffer - you wouldn't wish it on your worst enemy.

    If I can borrow Taffy's signature tag,
    I know I've not offered you any comfort, and I can't - apart from saying :cool: No, it's not just you!

    Best wishes
     
  4. andrear

    andrear Registered User

    Feb 13, 2008
    402
    Yorkshire
    HI Mark

    For me here and now are all that matters. At first I worried about everything but now I really do just take things on a day to day basis. I thought we'd lost mum last a couple of times but she's still around. Dad was ill not that long ago when he went off on walkabouts with only a vest and a pair of trousers in the pooring raing. He was really ill but he got over that one.
    Our lives are just on hold and that is very frustrating but I can't see any other way so we just have to keep on going.
    Love Andrea
     
  5. Mameeskye

    Mameeskye Registered User

    Aug 9, 2007
    1,669
    NZ
    Hi Mark

    From the moment of Mum's eventual diagnosis we lived with not knowing. As she had VAD we were well aware that not only could she slowly go down the progressive dementia route but that also, a huge stroke could carry her away within seconds.

    You can only try to live your life with this thundercloud looming. You make your plans, cross your fingers and hope for the best. Sometimes the oppressiveness gets to you and then TP is here for you.

    It doesn't go away but try to live for the now as Andrea suggests and try not feel guilty for enjoying the good times that are there.

    We have all felt as you are feeling.

    Love

    Mameeskye
     
  6. barbara h

    barbara h Registered User

    Feb 15, 2008
    96
    county durham
    Hi Mark

    No it is not just you a couple of weeks ago we thought my mam was near the end the doctor confirmed she was in the end stages but since then she has started eating and drinking again. It's an awful situation i am pleased she has improved a bit but you think about the quality of life and you wonder what is worse.
    We are going on holiday in three weeks and i am trying to get my head around going and trying to relax, i'm worried i will still be waiting for the phone to ring. Like Mameeskye my mam has vascular dementia so anything can happen anytime.
    I know it's no help but sometimes knowing other people are experiencing the same situation does help. We can support each other on here.

    Take care
    Barbara h
     
  7. SaraS

    SaraS Registered User

    Feb 14, 2007
    8
    Hull
    No its not just you!

    I have to say I resent it all and my mum who has it - especially when I see how it affecting my Dad. He is 89 and my mum is 82, and aside from the Alzheimers and her constant hyperchondria is strong as an ox!

    My Dad has recently started to say he has no life and doesn't expect to live to see his next birthday - that breaks my heart more than how my mum is. She is a mild case so far, memory is bad, worse when it suits!! Occasionally angry but not too bad.

    I sometimes wish it was a disease with a set end date to it and I feel guilty even saying it.

    Sara
     
  8. zonkjonk

    zonkjonk Registered User

    hey mark, your mum is much younger than mine
    but I go through the same feelings you are
    my mum is now unable to speak,toilet,urinate,walk or talk
    she can eat still, and drink
    bowel movements aided by drugs
    this disease is cruel and horrific
    oh, how I miss my mum, and oh how I wish I could save her.
    but I cant and none of us can.
    love from Jo
     

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