Introduction

JoeLad

Registered User
Jun 13, 2015
5
Although I registered myself to this forum in June last year I have not been able to find enough time to introduce myself due to many factors most notably trying to grapple with the worsening dementia of my wife.
To cut a long story short she is bedridden unable to express herself clearly. The good news is that in Dec 2015 NHS accepted to fully fund the care due to my wife following the usual assessments, but they have been very silent about the whole process since the anouncement date.

So I telephoned NHS in Jan 2016 stating recent problems for an re-assessment but they continued to remain silent

Browsing several govt. and NHS online information, I gathered the first step should have been for them to send a care manager/case Manager/Community nurse to meet us and discuss my needs etc.
Could someone in similar situation or better, please advise
Very many thanks JoeLad
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
60,484
Dundee
Sorry I can't advise. I know that many here will be able to comment on this process though. I just wanted to say 'hi' and welcome to TP. I'm glad you've posted as I'm sure you will get lots of help and support here.
 

fizzie

Registered User
Jul 20, 2011
2,732
Hi Joe
Welcome to TP
I'm not clear about why you need a re-assessment. If they agreed to fully fund care then that is what they should be doing from the date that they said they would take on the funding. Did they put it in writing?
 

JoeLad

Registered User
Jun 13, 2015
5
Hi Joe
Welcome to TP
I'm not clear about why you need a re-assessment. If they agreed to fully fund care then that is what they should be doing from the date that they said they would take on the funding. Did they put it in writing?
Thanks fizzie

I thought that any new plan need guidance as to its operation. So I trawled various web pages on NHS CHC. This is what I found in various NHS sites


'If you are entitled to NHS contining health care, the CCG will discuss options with you as to how your care and support needs will be best provided and managed...your wishes and expectations of how and where the care is delivered should be documented and taken into account...'

'If the NHS CCG says 'yes' they will choose someone to work with you. They might be called case manager, care manager or community nurse.....'

'Where a patient is eligible for CHC, the CCG will make arrangements for care to meet their assessed needs in line with section 108-111 and 166-171 of the National Framework......'

They did put it in writing that they would finance the care for my wife

Furthermore I donot know if everything that I have been paying for care, such as
inco sheets,wipe materials, gloves and paper bags for disposal of pads are included in the NHS care. Also the date on which the NHS starts to bear the cost of caring etc.

If the NHS had chosen a care/case Manager to work with me at the start I would have been able to clear all doubts.
 

JoeLad

Registered User
Jun 13, 2015
5
Sorry I can't advise. I know that many here will be able to comment on this process though. I just wanted to say 'hi' and welcome to TP. I'm glad you've posted as I'm sure you will get lots of help and support here.
Thanks all the same Izzy
Joelad
 

tigerlady

Registered User
Nov 29, 2015
427
Here is another link


Thanks tigerlady

I did come across this link but a quick glance showed nothing on what to expect once the CHC is approved.

JoeLad
It was probably easier in my case as my husband was in the mental health unit of a hospital when he was assessed for CHC and a list of homes with vacancies which had a contract with the NHS for CHC was given to me. In the link I gave you there is a section on page 23 which says what happens.

If the CHC is to finance care at home, then there is a different procedure which is explained in the link if you read it thoroughly. The In Reach team are easier to contact and could help you

As I was not happy with the home my husband went to, I tried for nearly 4 months to get him somewhere better, and I have to say that it was nearly impossible for me to make contact with the person dealing with my husbands case in the NHS CHC team - all I got was the answer phone and no one ever returned my calls - I even hand delivered letters to the office to try and get attention. I made so much fuss and got the In Reach team involved as well that I did get him in a better home, which hadnt been on the original list, as it had a waiting list, but I think the CHC people pulled strings to get him in.

If you read from this point on in the link it may explain things


5.4 Arranging care if you are eligible
When deciding upon the setting and package of care, staff should start with
your preferences. However the package agreed must be one that the CCG
believes is appropriate to meet your assessed health and social care needs
and the ‘outcomes’ you want to achieve. Staff should take account of any
risks associated with different types of care and of fairness of access to CCG
resources.
The CCG should provide sufficient funding to meet the needs identified in
your care plan and be based on the CCG’s knowledge of meeting your needs
in the locality where they agree you are to live.
Factsheet 20  July 2015 24 of 49
NHS continuing healthcare and NHS-funded nursing care
The CCG is responsible for ensuring you are told who is responsible for
monitoring your care and arranging regular reviews.
You should receive GP, dental and other NHS services as needed.
Note: If you are dissatisfied with the CCG’s proposed care package and
cannot resolve your concerns informally, the CCG should tell you how to
access and use the NHS complaints procedure. This issue is not a matter for
an Independent Review Panel to consider.
Care can be provided in a range of settings:
5.4.1 In a care home
The CCG is responsible for meeting the cost of your assessed care needs
and accommodation in a care home. It is more usual for it to be a nursing
home but it does not have to be.
Here are some issues to be aware of, if a care home is the preferred / best
option.
 The CCG may have a contract with one or more nursing homes in an
area but your assessed needs will determine whether they are suitable. There
may be ‘needs based reasons’ for the CCG to consider more expensive
accommodation than it usually would. The Framework Practice Guidance
PG 99.2 gives examples: where there is a recognised link between
challenging behaviour and feeling confined in a small room or identified
benefits of a specialist rather than generic care provider.
 It may seem more appropriate for you to move to a home


There is more stuff after this that is relevant