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Interesting article and blog on young onset dementia

Discussion in 'Dementia-related news and campaigns' started by CeliaW, Aug 17, 2015.

  1. LynneMcV

    LynneMcV Volunteer Moderator

    May 9, 2012
    3,651
    south-east London
    That was an interesting article yes - and has given me an idea for a new approach in keeping my husband reading.

    He was always a very avid reader. As the disease has progressed he has found it more and more difficult to finish books as he loses concentration, or can't keep to one line at a time.

    We have audio books, but he doesn't enjoy those much as he often has an issue with the voice of the person reading them. Having listened to some myself, I can understand that - the voices really drone on at times!

    But this article refers to reading short stories instead of novels. Why on earth didn't I think of that? It seems so obvious!

    I have just mentioned it to my husband and he seems keen to try.

    All I need now are some ideas of what adult short story collections are good to read !
     
  2. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,783
    Female
    South coast
    I dont know what his taste in stories are, but what about:

    No Comebacks - Frederick Forsyth
    Beggers Banquet - Iain Rankin
    Ring for Jeeves (and other similar) - PJ Wodehouse
    Nightfall and other Stories - Isaac Asimov
    A Blink of the Screen - Terry Pratchett


    If he has got favourite authors, try googling their name and "short stories" - most authors have written some.
     
  3. Sue J

    Sue J Registered User

    Dec 9, 2009
    8,035
    Thanks Celia for posting this, it's very interesting especially re. specific antibiotic treatment. My reactolight glasses help immensely.
     
  4. CeliaW

    CeliaW Registered User

    Jan 29, 2009
    5,643
    Hampshire
    Actually Sue, I thought of you when I read it as she comments about how variable her days / abilities can be x
     
  5. Sue J

    Sue J Registered User

    Dec 9, 2009
    8,035
    #6 Sue J, Aug 17, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2015
    I could identify with her a lot Celia:)

    I should have been followed up by UCL 2012 but no CMHT support so local scans not followed up as requested at UCL, am still trying to get them reviewed in what seems our now DIY NHS admin!
     
  6. LynneMcV

    LynneMcV Volunteer Moderator

    May 9, 2012
    3,651
    south-east London
    Thanks canary - those are great beginning points - he is definitely a very big fan of both Forsyth and Rankin - and he likes the other authors you mentioned too. We are definitely going to give this a go :)
     
  7. LynneMcV

    LynneMcV Volunteer Moderator

    May 9, 2012
    3,651
    south-east London
    Just thought I'd come back to this thread as I have finally found something that works - and today my husband started reading again!

    It wasn't the short stories that worked unfortunately - I did get some short stories by his favourite authors and spent many hours typing some of them out in large font.

    He gave it a go, bless him, and he was really grateful for all the effort, but sadly, as easy as it was to read the text, he was unable to concentrate on the story line and follow it through.

    I thought that was that, but recently attended a new group for people with dementia and their carers (run by a local library) and in conversation someone said to me 'how about poetry?'

    Well, I 've never really thought of my husband reading poetry, but why not, I thought. I tried him with some, including poetry from childhood as well as adult poetry - and he took to it.

    Then, knowing that my husband has a keen sense of humour, I was searching for other suitable reading materials and came across a book of jokes in large print.

    I gave the joke book to him today (it's our wedding anniversary and we always give each other a little 'token gift to mark the day) and he loves it! He has been dipping in and out of the jokes all day. It doesn't matter what order he does them in, he is relaxed and having a good old giggle.

    I'm so happy to see him getting enjoyment from reading again. I am going to look out for further suitable poetry / rhyme collections as well as some books with humorous anecdotes.

    Just thought I would share here in case any one else finds it a helpful idea to help loved ones previously keen on reading who are now struggling :)
     
  8. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,783
    Female
    South coast
    What a good idea Lynne
    Mum loves poetry too - but then she always has, so I never thought about it.
    Mum is especially fond of Pam Ayres humorous poetry and likes me to read it out loud to her. She also likes the poems by Lewis Carroll (from the Alice books) and AA Milne (When We Were Very Young and Now we are Six) because she remembers them from her childhood.
    Interestingly, I found this site.
    http://www.alzpoetry.com/book/
     
  9. LynneMcV

    LynneMcV Volunteer Moderator

    May 9, 2012
    3,651
    south-east London
    Thanks for these extra ideas too canary - I'll take some Carroll and Milne books out of the library and leave them laying around to see if he is drawn to them - I certainly have strong memories of owning and enjoying those books as a child. I like Pam Ayres too, I think my husband might enjoy her humour, we watched a televised interview with her earlier in the year and it held his interest.

    The link you provided was interesting too - and some very memorable pieces included.

    Thanks again for your help and ideas - very much appreciated!
     
  10. KingB

    KingB Registered User

    May 8, 2011
    255
    Berkshire
    Not quite the same thing I know - but this just reminded me that my parents used to write poetry as an aid to keeping their minds agile during the early stages of dementia. And i think they found the "what rhymes with ..." question easier than the "what do I want to say next" question.
    I suppose poetry is quite similar to songs too - usually fairly short, simple message, enjoyable phraseology and rhyming etc.
     

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