1. Expert Q&A: Living well as a carer - Thurs 29 August, 3-4pm

    As a carer for a person living with dementia, the needs of the person you care for will often come before your own. You may experience a range of difficult emotions and you may not have the time to do all the things you need to do. Caring can have a big impact on both your mental and physical health, as well as your overall wellbeing.

    Angelo, our Knowledge Officer (Wellbeing) is our expert on this topic. He will be here to answer your questions on Thursday 29 August between 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

Instant course ... trainer to carer... any one else had post grad learning in reality

Discussion in 'Researchers, students and professionals' started by Lori, Jun 28, 2012.

  1. Lori

    Lori Registered User

    Mar 14, 2005
    2
    Far south West
    Hi guys,

    I am a long experienced social worker and consultant in care... but boy did I have a lot to learn when I cared for my Dad for 3 months with memory issues... anyone else find this? He is also helping me as he is writing his experiences down 'while he still can'

    He even gave the nurses an A4 paper he wrote in the ward on the care of a man in his ward who was not helped... (he needed prompting) ... and so dehydrated...

    I am proud to be his daughter and now see why I have such a passion for care.

    Has anyone else found that we can learn from our folks?

    Lori
     
  2. Padraig

    Padraig Registered User

    Dec 10, 2009
    1,039
    Hereford
    Yes, one could learn a great deal from those of us who have traveled the complete journey in 'caring'. Sadly many ex-carers don't wish to look back on the constant lack of knowledge displayed by those in the medical profession.

    I ask myself; can it be that they don't wish to admit that anyone who has cared for a loved one on their own 24/7, 365 days for years till the end, might just have gained a deeper knowledge they don't have from their 'training'?
     
  3. NeverGiveUp

    NeverGiveUp Registered User

    May 17, 2011
    1,035
    I have found that many people in the nhs are working with dementia patients because there aren't jobs in other roles, they might be students studying for something else and need to earn some money to study. All sorts of reasons, none of the reasons were that they were doing that job because they care about people with dementia.

    Dementia is the Cinderella, problem is that it is treated as the ugly sister. No matter how much training people are given, if they don't want to be doing that job they will never develop the empathy needed.

    We, as relatives, have been accused of not putting mum in a NH because we are in some way exploiting her. They cannot get their heads around the fact that we feel home is the safest place for her, she has had some appalling treatment in hospital and respite. The professionals seem to think that I am exploiting her by being her carer - that's 6 years on CA and no salary!!!

    Most SW seem to be on their way to somewhere else more interesting.

    We live in a terrible world where people with dementia are a nuisance, no-one considers that they may get dementia themselves...
     
  4. Grommit

    Grommit Registered User

    Apr 26, 2006
    2,127
    Doncaster
    Well put Never Give Up.

    Your post echoes my own feelings and experiences with Care Homes, Social Workers, peripatetic Agency Carers and the whole system in general.

    Duty of Care is highlighted in many Care Home Brochures and Agency Handouts and bandied about as though it was something on which the whole system is based.

    The problem is that no one teaches what it means in terms of dedication, attention to detail and straight forward respect and consideration for the ones receiving the care.
     
  5. Bristolbelle

    Bristolbelle Registered User

    Aug 18, 2006
    1,847
    Bristol
    Haha....!!!!

    Like I say about having children it doesn't matter how many books you read there will be chapters on each individual topic but none on how to cope with them all simultaneously - that is only learned through real-life experience.
    But well done you for recognising and acknowledging this.
     

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