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Inside the Care Crisis With Ed Balls

lollyc

Registered User
Sep 9, 2020
566
0
I hope that those in Westminster - whatever their party - are hanging their heads in shame. This is the result of decades of ignoring "the science" - to use the current parlance - and I seriously question whether it will ever be fixed.
Those who have no experience of social care see it as funding old people, who should be selling their houses to fund their care. That became abundantly clear during the recent Social Care Reform furore. If society can't see the value, what hope is there?

I had not been aware of the different attitudes in other cultures, or that these groups rarely engage with social care. As their attitudes change, this will add more peopleto a system that is already failing to cope.

A round of applause for the wonderful Derek (?), caring for his beloved wife - although I'm afraid I feel inadequate, being a less than kind and patient carer myself. His despair at the lack of help given to carers was something I know many of us will recognise and understand, but he has actually done something to address the issue.

If I have a complaint, it is that it was never clearly explained that not everyone qualifies for LA funded social care. Many people will be funding their own care and will also be struggling to find carers in a field where people are departing in droves. And, whilst we all agree that carers are underpayed and undervalued, an increase in care costs will have the knock-on effect of self-funders running out of money more quickly, and depending on LA funding. I suspect that those who have no experience of the social care system assume that it works like the NHS - free for those that require it.

What is the answer?
I'm not sure that there is one. In an ideal world, society would accept that we need to have higher taxes to fund a social care system that we may ultimately never benefit from. Not optimistic on that score!
 

Dunroamin

Registered User
May 5, 2019
147
0
UK
I forget a lot of things, but E'ds comment "so as a cabinet minister, I failed you" has stuck in my mind.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
23,627
0
North Manchester
Locally the situation is getting worse.

Nine years ago when my wife attended an LA run dementia day centre attendance was free for all, transport was means tested and everybody paid for meals, this was strange because all care at home was means tested.

In 2015 the LA transferred all social care to a LATCO and means tested fees were introduced, day care slowly increased to £80+/day.

Because of an LA decision
Over the next three years, we are making savings of £12m from our current adult social care budget of £52m.
the LATCO decided that the model is unsustainable and have closed the dementia day care centre and a short stay centre.
The buildings are now empty and up for sale.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
6,768
0
Southampton
Locally the situation is getting worse.

Nine years ago when my wife attended an LA run dementia day centre attendance was free for all, transport was means tested and everybody paid for meals, this was strange because all care at home was means tested.

In 2015 the LA transferred all social care to a LATCO and means tested fees were introduced, day care slowly increased to £80+/day.

Because of an LA decision
Over the next three years, we are making savings of £12m from our current adult social care budget of £52m.
the LATCO decided that the model is unsustainable and have closed the dementia day care centre and a short stay centre.
The buildings are now empty and up for sale.
they probably knock them down and put flats and houses on them
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
2,214
0
High Peak
Generally, I echo what others have said - good, but will it change anything?

My one complaint would be the (probably unintentional) bias towards male carers. First, I know there are many wonderful male carers out there and a few who post here on TP, but the majority of carers are female. Unfortunately many in society still see caring for old people as 'women's work'. I'm sure everyone watching thought the man looking after his wife was amazing but I don't think women who care for someone are seen as amazing. Somehow, for a man to do the same thing seems 'above and beyond', much like bringing up children single-handedly. I'm not sure that will ever change :(

A couple of things that I thought did come across very clearly: first, the relentless and really hard work that visiting carers do and that for a 14 hour shift, the man was only paid for 8 and 3/4 hours. It's bad enough they receive such a low wage but to rip them off for travelling time is just scandalous.

The other thing was that I thought it showed very well just how much care people with dementia (and others) actually need. Many of the care home residents needed help with absolutely everything - eating, moving, dressing, washing and personal care. The programme showed just how long it takes to do such things, i.e. just to get someone through the day, often taking 2 or more carers for each person and of course, people need care during the night too. I really hope a few 'invisibles' saw this and now realise just how much their family member is doing every day.
 

nitram

Registered User
Apr 6, 2011
23,627
0
North Manchester
they probably knock them down and put flats and houses on them
LA will auction it as it is and leave it up to developer.
One will probably go for houses, the other maybe retirement flats.


Not much chance of either going for offices as everybody is now reducing office space because of (part time) WFH
 

lollyc

Registered User
Sep 9, 2020
566
0
I've just read a letter in Radio Times, by a viewer concerned about the lack of dignity shown to some of residents, and seemingly concerned about 2 male carers giving personal care to a lady. She felt that had the programme been about cancer patients at the end of life, it wouldn't have been portrayed in the same way.

Did anyone else feel like that?

I thought it showed just how much care a person with dementia needs, how many staff it requires to give that care, and how long it can take to give that care. I certainly didn't feel that the situtation was exploited to get a point across. In fact, it would perhaps have been more realistic to film a resident refusing to remove their soiled clothes, biting staff and shrieking like a banshee.
And, of course, many of these people are not EOL, this is their life for months, or years.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
6,768
0
Southampton
I've just read a letter in Radio Times, by a viewer concerned about the lack of dignity shown to some of residents, and seemingly concerned about 2 male carers giving personal care to a lady. She felt that had the programme been about cancer patients at the end of life, it wouldn't have been portrayed in the same way.

Did anyone else feel like that?

I thought it showed just how much care a person with dementia needs, how many staff it requires to give that care, and how long it can take to give that care. I certainly didn't feel that the situtation was exploited to get a point across. In fact, it would perhaps have been more realistic to film a resident refusing to remove their soiled clothes, biting staff and shrieking like a banshee.
And, of course, many of these people are not EOL, this is their life for months, or years.
there doesnt seem to have the same outcry of ladies washing male residents. where i worked, there were quite a few male carers as well as ladies. aside that, i had a male midwife deliver my daughter and he was a lot better than the ladies. its stereotypes
 

lollyc

Registered User
Sep 9, 2020
566
0
I'm not really sure if she was upset by it being male carers, upset about showing how vulnerable a PWD is, or perhaps about both. She's probably never had any experience of social care, or dementia.
 

Wildflowerlady

Registered User
Sep 30, 2019
593
0
My dad actually took a dislike to a male carer coming into his home and giving him personnel care, at that time he felt was can I say 'unnatural'. Dad didn't care females cleaning him up including myself and sister often told to just get on with it! Nearer the end at home he started to object to personal care which caused issues with carers coming into the home. Personally I think if you need personal care, you need it and shouldn't matter if male or female as long as person giving it is kind and is respectful as possible, that is all I would want. I remember when having my children being told to leave my dignity at the door and pick it up on my way out.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
6,768
0
Southampton
My dad actually took a dislike to a male carer coming into his home and giving him personnel care, at that time he felt was can I say 'unnatural'. Dad didn't care females cleaning him up including myself and sister often told to just get on with it! Nearer the end at home he started to object to personal care which caused issues with carers coming into the home. Personally I think if you need personal care, you need it and shouldn't matter if male or female as long as person giving it is kind and is respectful as possible, that is all I would want. I remember when having my children being told to leave my dignity at the door and pick it up on my way out.
i was told the same.
 

Jale

Registered User
Jul 9, 2018
596
0
When Mum first needed carers at home I did ask if possible for females, only because Mum of old would be embarrassed if she was going to be washed by a man - she never watched Call The Midwife because my Dad and brother would be in the same room:rolleyes:. Sadly now she just about hates everyone unless they have chocolate or biscuits