Incontinence

Jeanie 73

Registered User
Apr 20, 2013
199
N Lincolnshire
Monday was a bit of a day here and was topped by myself suddenly becoming incontinent,no warning didn’t feel I needed too pee so was taken by surprise!
I do know it’s inevitable towards the end, but does this mean I am perhaps closer to the end?
Probable that no one actually knows,but worth asking, feeling a bit paranoid have bought some bulkier Tena to use when I go out and in bed and know I have a waterproof sheet for bed probably need too put it on,just in case!❤
 

Philbo

Registered User
Feb 28, 2017
752
Kent
Hi

I would think it's worth going to see your GP to check that there's not something causing the problem (aside from the dementia)?

My wife (PWD) is incontinent, which for her at least, was something that came on gradually. Diagnosed 4 years ago, she had already started to have little "accidents" and we went from using panty-liner type products through to more substantial pull-up pants.

The way her dementia has affected her, it's been more a case of her forgetting the whole process of recognising the urge plus what do do when I take her to the toilet.

I don't believe that there are any set patterns as to when people with dementia may become incontinent. For my wife, it has happened quite early in her "journey" so I wouldn't be too concerned that this indicates "you are closer to the end". Everyone is different and as I said at the start, it could just be a blip.

Best wishes.
Phil
 

karaokePete

Registered User
Jul 23, 2017
5,082
N Ireland
Hello @Jeanie 73, I was once told by a person in the education sector that a person can have a spiked development profile so seeing one thing doesn't mean that everything else is at the same stage. My wife(PWD) has demonstrated the truth of this in relation to her dementia. Also, with my wife things that belong in 'a later stage' can happen but they occur infrequently so it's a matter of take precautions but don't panic about a complete change of life. I agree with Philbo about checking for other causes too.

I wish you the best of luck.
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
8,477
Yorkshire
hi @Jeanie 73
I agree, go have a chat with the continence nurse at your GP surgery - there are a lot of reasons why this might have happened, and once doesn't mean it will continue - best to check there isn't a physical cause or a UTI that just isn't giving other indications
 

Patrioted

Registered User
Jul 4, 2017
23
Monday was a bit of a day here and was topped by myself suddenly becoming incontinent,no warning didn’t feel I needed too pee so was taken by surprise!
I do know it’s inevitable towards the end, but does this mean I am perhaps closer to the end?
Probable that no one actually knows,but worth asking, feeling a bit paranoid have bought some bulkier Tena to use when I go out and in bed and know I have a waterproof sheet for bed probably need too put it on,just in case!❤
No way does this mean you’re nearing the end. If you were nearing the end you wouldn’t have been able to write that completely coherent question. It does however suggest that you have an “unrelated to dementia” incontenance issue. Please schedule a doctor visit and get it tended to.
 

Patrioted

Registered User
Jul 4, 2017
23
I guess, for spam concern reasons, I’m required to write ten posts so I hope this could take as one of them.
 

Patrioted

Registered User
Jul 4, 2017
23
Jeanie - As an Alzheimer’s patient myself I can pretty much assure you that you are not in the late stages of Alzheimer’s. Like myself, you can still write and communicate coherantly which suggests, like myself, you are still in the early stages of Alzheimer’s. Although incontenance is often a “late-stage” Alzheimers symptom it isn’t an early stage symptom. That suggests your incontenance is unrelated to your dementia diagnosis. Still, it needs to be treated just like any other person who does not have dementia must get their incontenance treated. Please see your doctor.

One other important point. You appear to be stressed out about your diagnosis. What we Alzheimers patients always need to be mindful of is that “stress” itself is one of the worst things for Alzheimer’s. Stress actually can speed up the progression. You are not responsible for your Alzheimer’s any more than a person is responsible for a wart on their foot. It just happened. Some people get heart disease. Some get cancer. Some get Alzheimer’s. We all have to die of something. None of us can escape death. I have Alzheimer’s to. I don’t like it but I accept it. I am just grateful that I lived long enough to even get old and that I was diagnosed early enough to help my family plan for the worse days to come. I try to enjoy what time I have left with my loved ones. I work hard to take it easy, mellow out, and avoid damaging stress. Most of my days are still happy. Don’t worry, be happy.
 

Jeanie 73

Registered User
Apr 20, 2013
199
N Lincolnshire
Many thanks to aall, I am 5yrs from actual diagnosis and 10yrs in a.together,according to memory clinic. I have over the last five hrs had instances of not knowing how to tie a knot,what to do with a knife and fork, not known where I was, etc
I also have PCA that affects y sight, but despite everything on the whole I have remained pretty optimistic and continue to do what I can in my garden,but every now and again some thing happens that’s different.
I have to say that now there are days when I think I’ve had enough! It gets harder to speak,to remember what I was going to say or do. I suppose that suddenly peeing oneself at 78yrs old is probable par for the course with or without Alzheimer’s/ PCA,but will get test for infection. Many thanks for advise❤
 

Murper1

Registered User
Jan 1, 2016
123
Many thanks to aall, I am 5yrs from actual diagnosis and 10yrs in a.together,according to memory clinic. I have over the last five hrs had instances of not knowing how to tie a knot,what to do with a knife and fork, not known where I was, etc
I also have PCA that affects y sight, but despite everything on the whole I have remained pretty optimistic and continue to do what I can in my garden,but every now and again some thing happens that’s different.
I have to say that now there are days when I think I’ve had enough! It gets harder to speak,to remember what I was going to say or do. I suppose that suddenly peeing oneself at 78yrs old is probable par for the course with or without Alzheimer’s/ PCA,but will get test for infection. Many thanks for advise❤
Hello. It is great for the many other PWDs that you are writing on here with your concerns. I don't have any special advice but just wanted to let you know your post is being read.:)
 

Haverton

Registered User
Sep 12, 2016
59
Essex
Hi Jeanie I have not posted for sometime. I am 64 and in the early stages of mixed dementia. I have had a couple of accidents during the night. As such, i wear tenna pants for men just incase, especially when on holiday or staying as a guest somewhere.

Your posts are so articulate and easy to read and i enjoy there content. I have lost my grammar and my spelling is even more a struggle. I drive my wife to distraction because of this

I too have trouble in remembering how to perform tasks where hitherto before my diagnosis i could easily complete. These include how to turn off a tap, access the micro wave and a cash point. Whilst such things are not on a everyday basis nevertheless it causes me me some stress.

Best wishes Jeannie
 

Jeanie 73

Registered User
Apr 20, 2013
199
N Lincolnshire
No way does this mean you’re nearing the end. If you were nearing the end you wouldn’t have been able to write that completely coherent question. It does however suggest that you have an “unrelated to dementia” incontenance issue. Please schedule a doctor visit and get it tended to.
Thanks for reply,but because I can write or appear too write reasonable posts does not mean that everything else is hunky-dory!
I use an iPad and have one for years now (luckily) it is the predictive text on it that actually writes my posts.
It knows me well so well it-can now complete a sentence for me,at first it seemed really creepy,but as time goes on it has become just part of me!
Without it what I write would be just gobbledygook, I can no longer write by hand I have days when I find it impossible to make sense when I speak.
I do not fear the end,but for now I have so much I still intend too do.❤
 

Jeanie 73

Registered User
Apr 20, 2013
199
N Lincolnshire
Hi Jeanie I have not posted for sometime. I am 64 and in the early stages of mixed dementia. I have had a couple of accidents during the night. As such, i wear tenna pants for men just incase, especially when on holiday or staying as a guest somewhere.

Your posts are so articulate and easy to read and i enjoy there content. I have lost my grammar and my spelling is even more a struggle. I drive my wife to distraction because of this

I too have trouble in remembering how to perform tasks where hitherto before my diagnosis i could easily complete. These include how to turn off a tap, access the micro wave and a cash point. Whilst such things are not on a everyday basis nevertheless it causes me me some stress.

Best wishes Jeannie
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,008
Scotland
Jeannie it is also Possible this is temporary. My husband had a spell of incontinence a couple of years ago and I bought all the necessary stuff and prepared for the worst. In fact after a month or two he was back on track and only rarely has an accident now.
 

Patrioted

Registered User
Jul 4, 2017
23
I hope all of you are taking bicopa and ashwanda supplements. Also vitamin B and folic acid supplements. Also a teaspoon of coconut oil per day. In the states these supplements are recommended for all Alzheimer’s patients. They are not a cure - nothing is yet, but they help and delay substantially. I take these supplements daily and can attest to the fact that they have helped me substantially with my overall cognition and sense of well being.
 

Beate

Registered User
May 21, 2014
11,835
London
You can take whatever you want but please don't give other people false hope. These things cost a lot of money but don't do much. If you feel they help you, fine, but it's simply untrue to state that they are recommended for dementia patients. Plus absolutely none of these things will prevent incontinence.
 

Moshi

New member
Mar 28, 2018
4
Monday was a bit of a day here and was topped by myself suddenly becoming incontinent,no warning didn’t feel I needed too pee so was taken by surprise!
I do know it’s inevitable towards the end, but does this mean I am perhaps closer to the end?
Probable that no one actually knows,but worth asking, feeling a bit paranoid have bought some bulkier Tena to use when I go out and in bed and know I have a waterproof sheet for bed probably need too put it on,just in case!❤
 

Moshi

New member
Mar 28, 2018
4
My husband has been incontinent for the last three years. We now control it with an appliance that I change daily and he wears a day bag and a night bag. I appreciate it is much easier to cope with male incontinence, but we have pads that I bought from a well known on line store, I put one over the sheet and two over the mattress and find that works well in case of accidents. It is certainly not a sign of the end. Just another blip.
 

Jeanie 73

Registered User
Apr 20, 2013
199
N Lincolnshire
My husband has been incontinent for the last three years. We now control it with an appliance that I change daily and he wears a day bag and a night bag. I appreciate it is much easier to cope with male incontinence, but we have pads that I bought from a well known on line store, I put one over the sheet and two over the mattress and find that works well in case of accidents. It is certainly not a sign of the end. Just another blip.
Many thanks❤