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Incontinence worse...

1954

Registered User
Jan 3, 2013
3,835
0
Sidcup
Well I was expecting this and MIL bed has got a protector on but unfortunately she has started being incontinent at night :eek: Yesterday the bed was flooded so last night she wore pants and pad and this morning she was again wet. To me this takes it all to another level. I think I will have to get the DN back so that I can have bigger pads to accommodate the urine

I will test her urine later today to make sure she has not got an infection but am sure its just the progression I was expecting
 

LYN T

Registered User
Aug 30, 2012
6,958
0
Brixham Devon
So sorry to read about this 1954

Incontinence is very difficult to deal with

Pads are difficult to keep in place especially at night. Could you use the sticky sided proctection pants. I found those were better as they can be adjusted to fit the wearer.

I'm sure others will give you better suggestions.

Take care

Lyn T
 

retiredcopper

Registered User
May 17, 2011
187
0
Yorkshire
I'm sorry to hear about your MIL's incontinence. My MIL has been doubly incontinent for 18 months now & it can be a struggle to deal with at times, especially as she gets uncomfortable in the pads during the night & manages to get them & her pants off, throwing them on the floor. I have now found that she is better sleeping in the Tena pads that are like nappies & then she wears pyjama bottoms which help keep the pad in place & deter her from getting the pad off. Unfortunately it's a learning curve & if you have a good incontinence nurse they will help find the correct product for your MIL.

All the best
Angie
 

Jessbow

Registered User
Mar 1, 2013
3,263
0
West Hertfordshire
We have the supplied 'nappy' type which I line with a 'Boots' large rectangular pad, nightime absorbancy .

Still get a wet bed.

I do find that netty knickers help- as soon as pad gets wet and gets compressed everything just runs out. they do help to hold the pad closer.

Get the best waterproof plastic mattress protector you can find , and perhaps terry towelling bottom sheets, or a bathtowel across the rubber sheet, but under a poly cotton sheet.

Kylies are good, but still need washing and I think are overpriced for what they do. Boots do a disposable bed mat.
 
Last edited:

1954

Registered User
Jan 3, 2013
3,835
0
Sidcup
We have the supplied 'nappy' type which I line with a 'Boots' large rectangular pad, nightime absorbancy .

Still get a wet bed.

I do find that netty knickers help- as soon as pad gets wet and gets compressed everything just runs out. they do help to hold the pad closer.

Get the best waterproof plastic mattress protector you can find , and perhaps terry towelling bottom sheets, or a bathtowel across the rubber sheet, but under a poly cotton sheet.

Kylies are good, but still need washing and I think are overpriced for what they do. Boots do a disposable bed mat.

Thankfully we pre-empt this problem and have a mattress cover :eek: Thankfully it was not so bad that the duvet was not wet. She's very good at keeping the pad and pants on................so far! And of course with the cough it is all made worse1
 

Aquamanda

Registered User
Jan 8, 2012
225
0
I see the Kylie sheets come in a pack of 2. Does each of them actually cover a single mattress or do they fit on half of the mattress? Its not clear from the picture, looks like a half size cover?
 

almin

Registered User
Oct 6, 2013
47
0
Surrey
In her last few weeks my OH used the 7 teardrop tena pullups, they fitted well and there was no leakage overnight, and comfortable for daytime use.
They cost £15 a week, but saved washing sheets and nightie every day.

I did a bulk buy for three months supply, but only used for two weeks.

Am sure a local hospice could use them when I get round to it.So much to do.

Best wishes to all

Almin
 

rajahh

Registered User
Aug 29, 2008
2,791
0
Hertfordshire
I see the Kylie sheets come in a pack of 2. Does each of them actually cover a single mattress or do they fit on half of the mattress? Its not clear from the picture, looks like a half size cover?

Yes they are half sheets. The ones I use have flaps at each end to tuck in. Place them on the bed around where the bum goes.

1954 you can buy duvet protectors and pillow protectors from incontinencechoice.co.uk

Frequently Gordon used to even soak the pillows as his pyjamas became soaked and it spread upwards and downwards.

He uses pull up pants and they are good but if he fiddles with them they still leak. However I have many nights now of dry beds.

Jeannette
 

1954

Registered User
Jan 3, 2013
3,835
0
Sidcup
Yes they are half sheets. The ones I use have flaps at each end to tuck in. Place them on the bed around where the bum goes.

1954 you can buy duvet protectors and pillow protectors from incontinencechoice.co.uk

Frequently Gordon used to even soak the pillows as his pyjamas became soaked and it spread upwards and downwards.

He uses pull up pants and they are good but if he fiddles with them they still leak. However I have many nights now of dry beds.

Jeannette

Thank you Jeanette

Kairen
 

Varandas

Registered User
Sep 2, 2013
227
0
Hampshire England
Kyle sheets (cotton or disposable) are life savers.
You can buy disposable one in a pack of 30 and size 80x170cms Sorry I do not have any links to UK shops. Nowadays I use the disposable ones mainly to cover chairs, sofas and the wheelchair to avoid leakages
I was so tired of washing the bed linen on a daily basis - there was never enough sheets, pillows and duvet too. Since we got a new memory mattress it has reduced to a third the daily washing. It is like a hospital bed and the mattress with a plastic washable cover.
I put on a pull up pants, with a stick on rectangular pad mostly at the back and the pyjama bottom.
My client also fiddles with the pants and remove the pyjama bottom and of course is a wet bed next day.
 

rajahh

Registered User
Aug 29, 2008
2,791
0
Hertfordshire
I also have chair protectors. They are waterproof on one side, but washable. I use a thin door mat by the side of the bed which also catches drips and is easily washed. I got the door mats from Wilk..s..ns

Jeannette
 

nita

Registered User
Dec 30, 2011
2,025
0
Essex
Do the test strips work if you press them on a used pad? I usually know when my mother has a UTI by her behaviour but I would like to be sure. I see they sell them on Amazon. Which type do TPers recommend?
 

Katrine

Registered User
Jan 20, 2011
2,837
0
England
Yes, it gets worse!

This has been our progression in the last year with my mother:

A. Usually continent while awake, with regular toileting. Incontinent when in bed, which is: rest after breakfast between 9am-11am, afternoon rest 2pm-5pm, night-time 8pm until 8am. Heavy duty pads used in the daytime inside knickers with pull-ups at night. Additionally: waterproof mattress protectors, duvet protectors, pillow protectors, and disposable bed pads and Kylie pads under the bottom sheet. Waterproof washable chair pads needed due to occasional daytime incontinence.

B. Increasing fluid retention during the day but more incontinence at night as her body releases the fluid built up in her tissues. Frequent night calls. Carer changing and washing her because she would walk to her toilet, wet on the floor, walk the urine into her bedsocks and then transfer the urine to her bed.

C. Inability to self-toilet safely at any time. Carer needed to deal with night-time visits to toilet, where she had invariably already wet her pull-ups and had woken as if to need the toilet but actually needed changing.

D. Increase in night-time urine volume. Often wetting the bed despite the highest absorbancy of pull-ups and Kylie sheets. Needing changing at least once a night, often the whole bed and night clothes, plus washing and drying her body.

E. Permanent incontinence, including daytime. Pads replaced by pull-ups at all times. NHS supplying pull-ups instead of pads (Yes, we are lucky). Purchase of additional Kylies, supplementary pull-ups, Tena wash cream, disposable gloves and aprons.

F. Breakdown of tumble dryer due to a carer drying Kylie sheets in it. This is a fire hazard because of the PVC backing, and the urine was inadequately removed by laundering, causing urine contamination of the whole machine. :(

G. Replacement of non-bio powder with biological washing liquid in order to kill the bacteria on the laundry. Purchase of wardrobe storage hangers, extra colour-coded towels and flannels, sheets etc. to create complete separation of Ma's laundry from that of other people living in the house.

H. Precise instructions for laundry added to care plan. Some carers would wash at 40 degrees on quick wash programmes (completely inadequate) and many don't know how to use a tumble dryer because they don't use them in their country of origin (many are South Africans). Common sense would tell people to keep urine contaminated laundry loads separate, but some people don't seem to have this common sense and need instruction.

I. Instructions to carers to deep-clean Ma's en suite bathroom to remove the funky smell that builds up despite daily cleaning. Walls, floor, toilet, basin, waste bin to be washed down with bleach solution. Bath mats, towels and flannels to be changed and washed at high temperatures after every use.

I currently feel like I'm still not on top of things, because I only visit every few weeks. I don't feel that everyone has a grasp of appropriate hygeine. It is like running a care home for one resident, without sufficient experience on my part as the manager. I am constantly playing catch-up. And, currently, we do not have to deal with faecal incontinence. My message is to be prepared, and to expect it to keep getting worse. :(
 

janice northam

Registered User
Nov 10, 2013
6
0
Illinois,U.S.A.
Katrine

This has been our progression in the last year with my mother:

A. Usually continent while awake, with regular toileting. Incontinent when in bed, which is: rest after breakfast between 9am-11am, afternoon rest 2pm-5pm, night-time 8pm until 8am. Heavy duty pads used in the daytime inside knickers with pull-ups at night. Additionally: waterproof mattress protectors, duvet protectors, pillow protectors, and disposable bed pads and Kylie pads under the bottom sheet. Waterproof washable chair pads needed due to occasional daytime incontinence.

B. Increasing fluid retention during the day but more incontinence at night as her body releases the fluid built up in her tissues. Frequent night calls. Carer changing and washing her because she would walk to her toilet, wet on the floor, walk the urine into her bedsocks and then transfer the urine to her bed.

C. Inability to self-toilet safely at any time. Carer needed to deal with night-time visits to toilet, where she had invariably already wet her pull-ups and had woken as if to need the toilet but actually needed changing.

D. Increase in night-time urine volume. Often wetting the bed despite the highest absorbancy of pull-ups and Kylie sheets. Needing changing at least once a night, often the whole bed and night clothes, plus washing and drying her body.

E. Permanent incontinence, including daytime. Pads replaced by pull-ups at all times. NHS supplying pull-ups instead of pads (Yes, we are lucky). Purchase of additional Kylies, supplementary pull-ups, Tena wash cream, disposable gloves and aprons.

F. Breakdown of tumble dryer due to a carer drying Kylie sheets in it. This is a fire hazard because of the PVC backing, and the urine was inadequately removed by laundering, causing urine contamination of the whole machine. :(

G. Replacement of non-bio powder with biological washing liquid in order to kill the bacteria on the laundry. Purchase of wardrobe storage hangers, extra colour-coded towels and flannels, sheets etc. to create complete separation of Ma's laundry from that of other people living in the house.

H. Precise instructions for laundry added to care plan. Some carers would wash at 40 degrees on quick wash programmes (completely inadequate) and many don't know how to use a tumble dryer because they don't use them in their country of origin (many are South Africans). Common sense would tell people to keep urine contaminated laundry loads separate, but some people don't seem to have this common sense and need instruction.

I. Instructions to carers to deep-clean Ma's en suite bathroom to remove the funky smell that builds up despite daily cleaning. Walls, floor, toilet, basin, waste bin to be washed down with bleach solution. Bath mats, towels and flannels to be changed and washed at high temperatures after every use.

I currently feel like I'm still not on top of things, because I only visit every few weeks. I don't feel that everyone has a grasp of appropriate hygeine. It is like running a care home for one resident, without sufficient experience on my part as the manager. I am constantly playing catch-up. And, currently, we do not have to deal with faecal incontinence. My message is to be prepared, and to expect it to keep getting worse. :(

My hubby and I recently relocated,he has had a traumatic brain in jury,with resulting dementia. He has better bowel/bladder control than he did yrs.ago,but it is NEVER certain . One day as we were going for a neighborhood walk,in our rural area...we met two of the young gentlemen who live near,"Bob" took off,in a real hurry,while we were introducing ourselves he had a bowel movement! It seems the signal"to go" is delayed to the brain. This has been going on for over six yrs.now. We continually have to adjust going on jaunts to the store,etc. I am never able to relax. we carry extra clothes in the car,etc.but going for a walk is a different story. :confused:
 

lin1

Registered User
Jan 14, 2010
9,351
0
East Kent
Sorry I can't help with the incontinence.
Since most clothing, linen nowadays states a 40 degree wash, I have cleaned and sanitised the washing machine every 3 three months
When mum was incontinent I did it once every couple of weeks

I dont use the ones you can buy, as they dont leave the machine smelling as nice and sweet as my method , plus my method requires a 90 degree washes, which to my mind is more bacteria unfriendly

1) I use a good couple of handfuls of, Baking soda on the longest boil wash
when you open the door, dont worry about any less than fresh smell, the next step will sort that out.

2) A bottle of Distilled vinegar ( white vinegar) and another boil wash,
once finished keep the door open, any vinegary smell will soon go
 

1954

Registered User
Jan 3, 2013
3,835
0
Sidcup
Oh gosh I must be lacking here! I just chuck the wet clothes/pants in the washing machine and when it is full I turn the machine on!
 

Lovleemummy

Registered User
Jun 13, 2013
77
0
Stoke-on-Trent
I am having a nightmare with my hubby mainly at night. I have nappies & pads supplied by incontinence nurse & also buy pull-up pants. I use the pull-up's when we go out "easier" but at night time he absolutely soaks the bed. I bought pants which hold up to 2200ml. How can anyone wee that much!!! I have also put pad & nappy, nappy & pant & also pads anything to stop him from getting so wet. He will sometimes use his urine bottle but has a tendency start weeing before the bottle is in place ending up with either the floor or me getting wet. The worst thing is he won't let me wash him in the night and does become agitated.
I suppose I'm lucky that at the moment he is just wet.
My family have said to get single beds but not sure (what do you think?) I don't very often get wet from him.
My first job every morning is to wash the bedding & PJ's on 60 degrees, is this hot enough & should I be disinfecting the washer?
All for 1 and 1 for all
 

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