Incontinence question.....

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by DaisyG, Aug 22, 2007.

  1. DaisyG

    DaisyG Registered User

    Feb 20, 2006
    183
    North West England
    Any advice appreciated...

    Incontinence issues ….
    I’ve had a call from the Urologist (secretary) , and they’d like to know if I’d like to go ahead with ‘being trained’ to insert a catheter (up to 2-3 x day) on my husband.
    He’s still retaining up to 200mls of urine (bladder scan)…. when he p's...
    Which is leading to ‘leakage and accidents’.

    I haven’t complained about having to change/wash/clean my husband, nor have I said how awkward and inconvenient it can be.
    They did say at out last appointment to think about it as a way forward.
    I’ve just got on with things, and the incontinence is just ANOTHER part of looking after him.
    They say if I do this it will prevent a few accidents particularly overnight . Catheter inserted on going to bed, then removed for sleeping…. Quick/simple procedure….

    There is NO pressure from them in any way, they were just asking how things were progressing, if at all.

    Has anyone else had this offered too them as an option? And if so, how has it worked out? Your thoughts please…..

    Take Care

    DaisyG
     
  2. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,661
    Kent
    Dear Daisy,

    We are not yet at that stage, but I would see it as a nursing procedure, and ask for a District Nurse [if there still are District Nurses] to visit to insert catheters.

    I know little about catheters and would not choose to learn.

    That is just my opinion and how I feel.

    Actually I feel quite cross that you should be asked in the first place. Perhaps if your husband should ever need surgery, they will want to train you up as a surgeon too.

    I`m sorry to react so strongly, but we are all being taken advantage of, and the more we give, the more will be expected of us.

    Love xx
     
  3. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,418
    I must admit my first response was as Sylvia's: surely this is a nursing procedure. On looking around it seems that it's not highly unusual for carers to do this, but I don't know that it's necessarily a good idea. 1) There's an increased risk of infection no matter how careful you are. 2) How will your husband respond to you doing this? 3) Do you feel comfortable with doing this? I'm sure there are a lot of other things to consider as well: those are just off the top of my head.
     
  4. Canadian Joanne

    Canadian Joanne Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 8, 2005
    15,975
    Toronto, Canada
    I'm with Sylvia & Jennifer - I think it's more of a medical matter than something for someone to do at home. Personally, I would not want to do so.

    Having said that, it is up to how comfortable you feel with it.
     
  5. Cate

    Cate Registered User

    Jul 2, 2006
    1,370
    Newport, Gwent
    Hi Daisy

    1) There's an increased risk of infection no matter how careful you are. 2) How will your husband respond to you doing this? 3) Do you feel comfortable with doing this?

    Daisy I agree with Jennifer on these points 100%

    Also

    but I would see it as a nursing procedure, and ask for a District Nurse

    Actually I feel quite cross that you should be asked in the first place. Perhaps if your husband should ever need surgery, they will want to train you up as a surgeon too.

    I`m sorry to react so strongly, but we are all being taken advantage of, and the more we give, the more will be expected of us.


    I think Sylvia is right.

    This is a very invasive procedure, I wouldnt even consider it. I think they have a flipping nerve even suggesting it.

    If they think this is going to help you, and hubby, let them send in the District Nurse.

    Climbs down off soap box:eek:

    Hope you are keeping well, so nice to hear from you.

    Love
    Cate
     
  6. hazelflower

    hazelflower Registered User

    Aug 22, 2007
    10
    carmarthen
    dear daisy

    i do agree with most of the other posts regarding your husbands catheter, but want to offer an alternative view point....is your husband uncomfortable? in my nursing experience urine retention is very uncomfortable for the patient, and the releif gained from temporary catherisation is immense..its just like when you sometimes have a catherter during labour..only used to empty the bladder and it dosnt remain insitu..i also believe that the procedure carried out at home with training and cleanliness carries far less risk of infection than in hospital !! it is not a complicated procedure and one that many carers are able to do with the relevant training..and for the patient a lot less embarrasing than continual washing and changing .but of course this depends on how you feel about doing it...and i have to agree that it feels like passing the buck when it comes to nursing support....but remeber the important ones are you and your husband..l hope you make the best descision for yourself and what have you to loose from doing the training and seeing what it entails then make the descision take care lots of love hazel
     
  7. taylorcat

    taylorcat Registered User

    Jun 18, 2006
    171
    W.Scotland
    Daisy, my Mum had a long term catheter even before Alz. set in, so it just stayed. When she was at home the district nurses always came in and out to change it etc. Catheters can cause infection very easily if not dealt with properly. Personally I would say no. My Dad was never asked to do this.
     
  8. Kayla

    Kayla Registered User

    May 14, 2006
    621
    Kent
    My Dad needed a catheter after he had a stroke and he already had an exiesting prostrate problem. One day, an unsupervised junior doctor had to put the catheter in and made Dad bleed a little. He got sceptacaemia (blood poisoning) and nearly died, but fortunately recovered after several weeks in hospital.
    This procedure is quite risky and needs a properly qualified doctor or perhaps nurse to do it. I agree with the others who think it is better not to get involved. A doctor or District Nurse should make a home visit and perform this task.
    Kayla
     
  9. DaisyG

    DaisyG Registered User

    Feb 20, 2006
    183
    North West England
    Thanks....

    Hi,

    I think they have asked me as they know I have a nursing background, but all the same when I trained we were not allowed to catheterise men ... just the ladies...
    The Urologist said it as though it 'were completely normal'.....
    I know and understand the 'dangers' involved....

    He's not complaining of pain from retention at all. He's not aware that he is retaining urine....
    Know all about retention, he's had that a few times, and YES... was in incredible pain ++

    They've also talked about long term catheters, and a little down the line... operations......


    Thanks for your thoughts/ advice...

    For now I'm just carrying on as we are... Won't be made to do invasive procedures on a daily basis... Not fair on either of us.

    Take Care,

    DaisyG
     
  10. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Daisy, nobody has made that suggestion to me, and I agree with the others that it should be a job for a nurse. OK, you're a trained nurse, and would be able to do it safely, and I understand Hazel's point about there being less risk of infection then in hospital, but I don't think you should have been put in that position. If it's necessary, a nurse should be provided to carry it out. I'm glad you've said no.

    Love,
     
  11. elaineo2

    elaineo2 Registered User

    Jul 6, 2007
    945
    leigh lancashire
    Hi DaisyG,I just read your post.I agree with all the posts saying nurses should be involved.If you don't have a problem with the incontinence then stay as you are.Retaining can be a problem(i experience this through working with the elderly and deal with continence issues with continence advisors).My experience of it and the knowledge passed on from advisors is that 150mls retention is their normal limit,however slightly over is not always a problem.Monitoring output is difficult when continence products are used though.A client of mine was catheterised due to retention,the D/N inserted the catheter and drained 1.5 litres!Now thats retention!Another one was at the hospital yesterday and the consultant said they should be catheterised because they pee a lot!doesn't make sense to me,no retention whatsoever.You do what you and your husband are happy with.take care.love elainex
     
  12. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    I would say that you can train me if you like , only in case of a emergency , but I want district nurse coming out also .

    {emergency meaning in case it fall out, nurse not around }
     
  13. Nebiroth

    Nebiroth Registered User

    Aug 20, 2006
    3,518
    Phhhtt...I'd say "I don;t want to be trained, I don;t feel I could ever do this safely or without hurting my husband" and insist that you are visited by a nurse to do it.

    One could be generous, and say that they want you to be able to do this so that it's being done by someone familiar, at a time of your choice or at need.

    Or one could be cynical, and say that they 're trying to save money.

    I would say, if you're the least bit unhappy about it, stand your ground and say you can't and won't.

    You're already doing most of the caring for your husband, I don;t see why you should take on more by undertaking what is IMHO effectively a medical procedure.
     

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