In The Dark - Alzeimher's Germany

Discussion in 'Middle - later stages of dementia' started by CatKins 1, Aug 1, 2015.

  1. CatKins 1

    CatKins 1 Registered User

    Aug 1, 2015
    26
    #1 CatKins 1, Aug 1, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2015
    Apologies - for personal reasons, am deleting this post. Not sure how to completely delete.
     
  2. Kevinl

    Kevinl Registered User

    Aug 24, 2013
    4,780
    Salford
    Hi CatKins, welcome to TP
    I've no idea how the Germans handle care for those with AZ but it must come up pretty often that there must be a system in place to deal with it.
    There must be plenty of people in Germany who cannot afford to pay for care or have no insurance so when you say " the health insurers are assessing how and if her care will be paid for as she cannot pay this herself" they can't just throw her out on the street, there must be some safety net. Hopefully someone who knows the German system will come along with some advice.
    Personally I'd distance myself as much as possible from the situation, it may sound a bit hard but if you're not at all close (I have a similar situation with a brother) then don't let anyone start trying to involve you in a way you're not happy about.
    It's quite possible the German authorities will want to pack her off back to the UK if they can so they avoid the costs of keeping her.
    What view the NHS would take if she did come back is another matter, others here must have brought a relative back from overseas but I guess you'd have to have her with you and start the ball rolling from there, but if you're not happy doing that don't let anyone try and make you.
    K
     
  3. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,711
    Female
    London
    #3 Beate, Aug 1, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2015
    I am from Germany but I have lived here so long that I don't know the health system very well anymore. Generally I think the care is good but I don't know what you have to pay for.

    In the UK, costs depend on two factors: whether you are self-funding (over £23,250 in assets) or not and in which borough you live, as they all charge completely differently for different things like day care, carers, sitters, respite and care homes. Your sister would be eligible for things like Attendance Allowance and council tax exemption, but I don't know how the system will treat people who have lived overseas for so long. You also might have to go through the process of getting diagnosed over here and getting into the NHS system and having needs assessments through Social Services.

    The German state will be responsible for her care I assume as she has lived there so long and I find it strange that the POA (who is this person in relation to her?) wants to get rid of her instead of dealing with the care issue in Germany, and why he would contact you about it. You are in no way responsible for arranging anything and he shouldn't put this on you. If he thinks she might be better off here, he ought to organise it himself. But I would be very surprised if a country could just "deport" someone on the grounds of an illness.
     
  4. chick1962

    chick1962 Registered User

    Apr 3, 2014
    11,278
    Female
    near Folkestone
    Hi, like Beate I am from Germany too. The care system is normally very good in Germany and the systems are quite similar. Social services have to pay if there is no capital . Why they would say a move to England would be better is beyond me? Could it be that she has reverted back to speaking English ( mind most Germans speak English) or that she is referring to her past? However just say a move is not possible and let the authorities deal with it. It's a strange one. But like Beate I have not lived in Germany for over 20 years so I only know a few bits due to my mum having care over there.


    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     
  5. CatKins 1

    CatKins 1 Registered User

    Aug 1, 2015
    26
    Thank you Kevini for your helpful reply. I think you're right - the German authorities are trying to make my sister come back to the UK so they don't have to pay her care costs. Going out to Germany this week just to check out the Care Home, but might have to distance myself when I get back as feel pressurized by the Power of Attorney to bring my sister back to the UK. Although how they expect me to do this, now she has to be hoisted in and out of bed and is in a wheelchair with two broken spine bones is beyond me! Thank you again, I really appreciate your understanding. :)
     
  6. CatKins 1

    CatKins 1 Registered User

    Aug 1, 2015
    26
    Hello Beate Thank you for your kind and helpful reply and information about assessment for care costs in UK. The POA is a man appointed by the Court and is not known to my sister. He is now supposedly looking after my sister's affairs but just seems interested in getting her back to the UK. She is too ill to be moved at the moment so I don't know what they have in mind. Am pleased I've joined the Forum and can talk to others who have an understanding of this devastating disease and the hurdles of care systems. :mad:
     
  7. garnuft

    garnuft Registered User

    Sep 7, 2012
    6,588
    I think, compared to the United Kingdom NHS, every other system leaves a LOT to be desired, but Germany is NOT one of the ones most wanting.

    I do, however, understand a Court appointed Attorney wondering if her needs wouldn't be better met in her native UK.

    I would assume it's the basic premise of closeness to family and familiarity,
    allied with a care package that frees the German authorities from expense.

    Not that I would EVER condemn them as of late, they are the KINDEST Nation to the desperate people in need of asylum.

    I don't think the German system will let her down, any more than ours would.

    One day, there wil be proper support for ill and disabled people in the UK and throughout Europe... not in these current climes.

    We all should mobilise and be more politically aware as that is the voice that pays the Piper.
     
  8. CatKins 1

    CatKins 1 Registered User

    Aug 1, 2015
    26
    Hello Chick1962, thank you for your post, very kind. Yes, my sister seems to have reverted back to speaking English but I'm not sure if she speaks German when I am not there. I will be more firm and say a move back to the UK is not possible. Will see what happens when I visit this week (going to check out Care Home). Trying to come to terms with this dreadful illness without wondering where on the globe my sister is going to be! Thanks again. :)
     
  9. chick1962

    chick1962 Registered User

    Apr 3, 2014
    11,278
    Female
    near Folkestone
    Hope your visit will work out well. It's like Garnuf said they might think it's more familiar for her here in the UK but the care should be good in Germany . It must all be a worry for you . Hugs xxx


    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     

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