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Imaginary people taking up residence

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Mrsbusy, Feb 10, 2016.

  1. Mrsbusy

    Mrsbusy Registered User

    Aug 15, 2015
    356
    #1 Mrsbusy, Feb 10, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2016
    Hi, just need a bit of advice really. Mum had VD for over three years now, probably more like six years. Recently since Sunday she keeps wanting to go home, doesn't believe her home of nearly thirty years is where she lives with my Dad. More worryingly she insists there are four to six adults taken up residence In the house, where they are the only occupants. She says they expect Dad to cook dinner for them, and they never talk to her or Dad just amongst themselves. She is put out that she isn't included in the conversation by them.

    Dad keeps taking her for walks, he has very bad legs too, so not easy. Then when they return she isn't convinced they are home. She can't understand why these people leave their own homes to stay at their house. I know this is all fabrication etc but what I would like to know is what it be worth arranging to see GP to see if medication would help or is this just something untreatable and a learn to live with problem again. Or would lowering her anxiety levels help, she's already on fluoxetine . They get no help apart from me as Dad too proud to accept situation and defeat and sees it as his job to do what he can and is convinced he's coping but he's not. I'm sure it's not a urine infection as she has urine checked regularly due to kidney failure and no other signs eg aggression etc.

    Appreciate any advice. Thanks.
     
  2. Quilty

    Quilty Registered User

    Aug 28, 2014
    1,056
    GLASGOW
    My Mum lived alone and was scared to leave her bedroom because of strangers in the house. She also thought it was someone elses house. In her case it was part of the dementia, as she started hearing and seeing things. DO check it out with your GP as no two people are the same.

    Its very hard, but you are not alone
    Big Hug
    Quilty
     
  3. Witzend

    Witzend Registered User

    Aug 29, 2007
    4,296
    SW London
    I think someone on here found that yelling, 'Oi, you lot up there! Clear off!' or words to that effect, and then telling the person a few minutes later that they'd gone, worked for the moment. Of course such a ploy might have to be repeated ad lib.

    Sometimes people with dementia think that what they see on TV is real, and consequently whoever happens to be on TV is there in their living room, or they have gone upstairs. My mother didn't do it with people, but after watching wildlife documentaries, which she did enjoy, she would need to go and check that there weren't any orang outans or polar bears rampaging about upstairs.

    I think this sort of thing is fairly common - I would hope that the right medication might help.
     
  4. shelagh

    shelagh Registered User

    Sep 28, 2009
    476
    Staffordshire
    I think it is common

    My mum also had Vascular Dementia and she constantly believed that her two brothers , both dead were in the house, Often we were told to be quiet because Bill was on nights and needed his sleep or we had to go home because she had meals to cook. I often felt that the reason she was so happy at home was because it was filled with her beloved dead. So for her the confusion was positive but it is very common, Mum's only medication was a half tablet of Prozac which she had until she died and which certainly stopped the depression which was so awful at the beginning while she was aware of what was happening,
     
  5. Mrsbusy

    Mrsbusy Registered User

    Aug 15, 2015
    356
    Thank you all for your replies. I know it's common in this awful journey, but just wondered if medication would help but I gather from what you have said its not sorted by medication unfortunately. Polar bears I suppose ar worse than people eating your dinner I suppose, but I will tell her to shout clear off next time she seems them. Just dreading the time when she doesn't believe Dad is her husband but suppose we will deal with that too.
     
  6. Aisling

    Aisling Registered User

    Dec 5, 2015
    1,807
    Ireland

    These episodes are so traumatic and difficult.my OH has periods when he thinks there are lots of people in the house and he wants them out. It happens mostly in the evenings and at night time. I had to cover all mirrors in our house. As soon as evening shadows happen I close all curtains.

    He wants to go "home" several times each day. I try to distract him but sometimes take him for a short drive.

    Am so sorry you have all this to deal with and also your Dad. yes I would talk to your Mum's GP. Medication can help.

    Keep posting. TP is my lifeboat! We are all here to support you.

    Virtual hug.

    Aisling ( Ireland)
     
  7. Mrsbusy

    Mrsbusy Registered User

    Aug 15, 2015
    356
    Thank you for the hug, I'm in need of it. TP is my lifeboat too, and I'm wearing a life jacket whilst I'm sitting in the boat.

    Having thought about this new problem, and realised that a few weeks ago all my Mum wanted to do is sleep, I have realised that this change in behaviour is probably due to her having a steroid infusion mid January for her kidney failure. She now has too much energy, and her brain is on overdrive too!

    I know from my own steroid infusion I feel so much better and energetic , so I can clean the house quicker etc and walk without pain etc and presume this is what my ?Mum is experiencing but as she isn't able to do anything anymore stimulation is needed.

    Dad has bad knees and is shattered by all this walking, just glad the last few days weather has been nice, but Saturday is snow so who knows.

    On the funnier side of things when I spoke to her last night, she was most upset that the people had left her house but didn't even leave a note to say what time they would be back! Aargh!!
     
  8. its a struggle

    its a struggle Registered User

    #8 its a struggle, Feb 11, 2016
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2016
    HTML:
    [/HTMLOn the funnier side of things when I spoke to her last night, she was most upset that the people had left her house but didn't even leave a note to say what time they would be back! Aargh!![HTML]


    Ah Mrs Busy, this could be an opportunity! Perhaps one of you could write a note from the 'people' thanking mum & dad for their hospitality and saying they are very sorry but they had to leave and won't be back.

    Of course this may not help if they came back! Apologies if you have thought of this ruse already.
     
  9. Livveywills

    Livveywills Registered User

    Jul 11, 2015
    57
    Hi,

    My mum has similar delusions. When they first started she was given an antipsycotic drug for several weeks. Risperidone. It stopped her seeing faces and people and she settled well. It wasn't something she could take long term, not overly sure why that was. Now the delusions are back and pretty constant, although the further down this road of dementia we travel mum does seem less bothered by the strangeness of what she thinks she sees which is a good thing.

    So although nothing is going to work forever it might be that the doctor could prescribe something that will help for a while.
     
  10. Mrsbusy

    Mrsbusy Registered User

    Aug 15, 2015
    356
    Thank you for your replies. I will try the note idea, never thought of that! It's so sad to see her so worried and that the pair of them are walking around in the cold because of the delusions. Mum told me she is frightened but doesn't know what of.

    Like everyone on here I hate this disease!
     

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