Im not really sure what I am asking, but things have changed today.

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Ohso, Oct 22, 2019.

  1. Ohso

    Ohso Registered User

    Jan 4, 2018
    165
    My mum has until recently been able to heave herself to a sitting position using a grab rail on her bed ( she lives with me) I hear her getting up so go in and help her the rest of the way, then up out of bed and was taking her the 20 or so feet to the toilet in the hallway.

    About 2 weeks ago she complained of sore ankles and became unable to weight bare, this meant she was only moving from bed - chair - commode - back to bed ( with help) she was improving and was able to stand for short periods, I thought the ankle problem was clearing up and she was ok.

    During this time, she seemed to be improving in her communication and awareness of her surroundings, speaking in the odd sentences and laughing a little, her appetite has always been pretty good too.

    In general terms she has spent the last 6 months sleeping around 20 hours a day, occasional incontinent and eating well, breakfast then 2 course lunch and same at dinner time ( soft mushy food as she has no teeth) She has carers 3.5 hours each day and I work from home so am here all the time too

    For a couple of weeks, since her ankle became sore, she has been calling out 'help' even if I am in the room, she eventually stops but seems not to know what she needs help with, but usually seems to be using the commode that resolved it.

    Last night she slept solidly from 7pm - 9am this morning, barely moved in bed, and all day today she has been immobile, not spoken apart from a couple of unintelligible words and one sentence, I did understand and has been making raspy noises in the back of her throat, she has however eaten and had sips of liquid.

    I thought initially she may have had a stroke overnight but she has no facial signs and can move limbs, just inches, but still moving them. She also has been awake most of the day, simply laying still, (she can close her eyes) she doesn't seem distressed or frightened, more vacant and still...

    I dont know what to think, the Dr is due later, he asked me if I thought it was a stroke ( !!) I am not keen for her to go to hospital unless he has a very good reason for it.

    Any thoughts from anyone would be gratefully received xx
     
  2. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,712
    Female
    South coast
    It could be an infection - it causes havoc in PWDs.
    My OH is just getting over a UTI and the only things I noticed were that he suddenly could not weightbear and he was really, very confused.
     
  3. Ohso

    Ohso Registered User

    Jan 4, 2018
    165
    Thank you. We have thought urine infection a few times over the last few months but nothing has ever shown up despite erratic behaviour so im less inclined to think its that.
     
  4. Ohso

    Ohso Registered User

    Jan 4, 2018
    165
    GP has been and wants her to go to hospital. He said it was the only thing to do at this stage to see whats going on, raised temporature and oxygen level of 93 he suspects a chest infection so now awaiting ambulance and making plans to be there overnight. Hopefully they will be as keen to get her home as l will be.
     
  5. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    318
    I hope everything goes well, sending you big hugs
     
  6. Ohso

    Ohso Registered User

    Jan 4, 2018
    165
    Thanks. Hopefully its simple infection as Canary suggested so she will get treated and get home x
     
  7. Rosserk

    Rosserk Registered User

    Jul 9, 2019
    318
    I will cross my knees, fingers and toes for you x
     

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