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If delirium continues what is me t course of action?

Little Circles

Registered User
Mar 30, 2017
81
0
Derbyshire
My Dad has been admitted to hospital this week with a suspected UTI well that is what they are treating him for, but he has delirium and quite violent with it, though he was a person with a temper before He was violent towards the staff and myself. They are giving him antibiotics, but his blood tests show not infection indicators, we are not allowed to see him, not due to the Covid restrictions but as they think he will get aggressive and the need to keep him calm. They have sedated him with Lorazepam. They say how long Delirium lasts is like a piece of string, days, weeks, months or you never recover. Dad had shown dementia tendencies, but he did not want to be assessed so if it is it is undiagnosed. I am concerned if his delirium continues and the next course of action.
 

Sarasa

Volunteer Host
Apr 13, 2018
3,021
0
Sorry to hear about your dad @Little Circles . Any sort of infection seems to play havoc with the cognition of people with dementia, diagnosed or not. It was when she caught a nasty virus that I realised my mother’s behaviour wasn’t due just to her personality as she aged, but was probably due to dementia.
I hope the hospital get the infection and aggression sorted, and you get to visit him. Does your dad still live at home and does he have support from family and or carers? While he’s in hospital it might be time to review what he needs and get things in place for when he’s discharged.
I’m sure others will be along soon with their tips and suggestions. My mother did improve a lot after her virus went away, but not to the level she’d been at before.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
15,178
0
South coast
Im afraid that at this stage it is impossible to know what will happen long-term. You can only respond with how everything is at the time. It can take up to six months for the delirium to resolve as much as its going to and until that stage doctors dont like to commit themselves. Are you concerned about him returning home with delirium? Make sure you talk to the hospital Social Worker before he is discharged.
 

Little Circles

Registered User
Mar 30, 2017
81
0
Derbyshire
Im afraid that at this stage it is impossible to know what will happen long-term. You can only respond with how everything is at the time. It can take up to six months for the delirium to resolve as much as its going to and until that stage doctors dont like to commit themselves. Are you concerned about him returning home with delirium? Make sure you talk to the hospital Social Worker before he is discharged.
Yes, I am extremely concerned about him returning home with Delirium. I used to go around once or twice a day before this but to be honest, I am worried about him being aggressive to me and I don’t know if he could be able to function on his own in his home. The hospital have had a psychiatrist do a report and she says he doesn’t have capacity and she has recommended he is not discharged home.

They have said he might go to a community hospital for assessment and evaluation of his needs. He was violent to the medical staff in hospital and tried to hit me so I have been told not to visit as it might set him off. He is still mobile and physically he is quite strong for his age I have been told. The hospital said they wont discharge him until they have had a discussion on the best next course of action.
My brother who lives away favours his home with carers but there is still a lot of hours in the day to fill when carers and myself can’t be there. They also said they are treating for an infection but his blood results don't show an infection marker.
 

Little Circles

Registered User
Mar 30, 2017
81
0
Derbyshire
Hi @Little Circles ,
I am not sure how things exactly work in the UK, but I have often read on here that it is advisable not to accept him being discharged home. Once he is at home the problem is entirely yours. And the situation seems really hard to cope with.
Basically that is what the Psychiatrist said but just got to find the strength to said that.
 

Little Circles

Registered User
Mar 30, 2017
81
0
Derbyshire
Decided to ring the hospital for a update on Dad and expected to speak to the Ward Sister and they nurse put me through to my Dad, big Mistake!!! he wants to come home, shouting down the phone he wants nothing to do with me or my brother and he will be on his own from now on. He wants to scrub us out of his life. Hopefully that is the delirium talking and I wont be ringing again today. The ward sister told me he was calmer yesterday and this morning. My mistake for ringing. My mistake for caring.
 

Banjomansmate

Registered User
Jan 13, 2019
2,844
0
Dorset
NOT YOUR MISTAKE!
The mistake was by the hospital staff member who put you through to your father. He obviously cannot return home and I think you have to ask your brother why he thinks visiting carers will be able to and indeed why he thinks they should be expected to, cope with a violent and abusive client?
 

Little Circles

Registered User
Mar 30, 2017
81
0
Derbyshire
Indeed
NOT YOUR MISTAKE!
The mistake was by the hospital staff member who put you through to your father. He obviously cannot return home and I think you have to ask your brother why he thinks visiting carers will be able to and indeed why he thinks they should be expected to, cope with a violent and abusive client?
Indeed
I just don’t know what is going to happen
Making me feel so anxious worrying on the next steps x
 

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