1. susiewoo

    susiewoo Registered User

    Oct 28, 2006
    82
    Bromley Kent
    My Mum is finally getting her new hip next week and during her time in hospital one of the family will always be with her...the hospital are happy to let us stay 24 hrs to ensure she is never left on her own.
    Has anyone ever done this and has any advice or tips that could help?
    I have organised everything Mum might need and have comfortable clothes for myself that I can sleep in as well as look reasonably respectable!
    Ideas on how to keep Mum and myself occupied would be useful.
     
  2. BeckyJan

    BeckyJan Registered User

    Nov 28, 2005
    18,972
    Derbyshire
    Gosh - what a question which I wish I could answer.

    All I can suggest is to 'go with the flow' .... not very helpful but maybe you will get better answers from others on TP. We are somewhat limited as we do not know how your Mum is reacting to the 'normal'. Let us know how she is progressing and maybe more help will follow.

    I do hope all is well and admire you so much for being so prepared 24 hrs. etc. (and to look reasonably respectable too!!!).

    Take care Jan
     
  3. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,438
    Well done you for getting this in place - when I wanted to stay with my mother they wouldn't let me.

    I have however just completed several days of staying over with my husband so here are my tips for what it's worth (in no particular order).

    Make sure you have adequate change for vending machines and the like - you almost certainly will have broken sleep while you're doing this and sometimes you just need to have a wander in order to get the circulation back into your legs, and it's nice to have a reason to wander i.e. I need to get a drink.

    Also, take drinks and snacks. I know that contradicts what I said above, but sometimes you're not going to want to be bothered.

    Take a pillow or neckroll and a lightweight blanket. I also take my ipod and headphones since if nothing else I can listen to a book on tape and that passes the time. In fact, think about what you would take with you on a long flight and you won't go far wrong.

    To be honest, I'm less concerned about looking respectable, but a hairbrush and a toothbrush are obviously good things to have, plus wet wipes.
     
  4. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,871
    Kent
    What a loving family to arrange 24 hour company.

    I can only think of children`s games like snakes and ladders, Lotto, etc. and simple jigsaws that can be done on a tray. Also I spy and I went to market.

    Hope it all goes well.
     
  5. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Susiewoo,

    From my experience when John was in hospital, there is always something to do -- drinks, meals, toilet, etc. I imagine your mum will sleep a lot of the time anyway until the anaesthetic is out of her system, so I'd take a few good books.

    That's assuming she'll have her own room. If she's in a four-bedder, you won't get much chance to do anything -- the other three will assume you're there for their benefit as well.

    I spent a lot of time in hospital with my mum, and I found it absolutely draining.

    Good luck,
     
  6. susiewoo

    susiewoo Registered User

    Oct 28, 2006
    82
    Bromley Kent
    Thanks so much..some really good ideas...the jigsaws might be good if I can find some of the kids old ones and the heads up about the small change is exactly the sort of thing I would have over looked.
    Mum has short attention span obviously but responds well to attention. Apart from the Alzheimers and the dodgy hip she is physically OK. I know she will be a bit drowsey for the first few days but once she really wakes up she will be difficult to tie down as she is a wanderer. This is really why she needs someone there all the time as she will be off in a flash...not withstanding the operation!!!!!!!
    She is much happier when she has someone familiar with her and to be honest I couldn't leave her alone.
    I regard her stay in hospital as akin to one of my children being there....no-one raises any objection to a parent staying with their child...I just told them this and no-one has questioned it.
     
  7. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #7 Margarita, Oct 12, 2007
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2007
    can't think of anything else that has not been already said . I remember staying over with my daughter in hospital when she was younger , sounds like a good idea when someone said above to get one of the neck pillow thing to put around your neck when your siting up , Oh also a radio that both of you can listen to .
     
  8. Nell

    Nell Registered User

    Aug 9, 2005
    1,170
    Australia
    The Good go to Heaven

    Just thought this could be useful if you are doing any walking or using any steps when with your Mum . . .

    When I had my knee replaced the Physiotherapist taught me "The Good go to Heaven"!!

    This means: start off with the "good" leg - step up with the good leg. It is so simple but it was a vital piece of information for me after surgery.

    Of course, the reverse is also true "the Bad go to Hell!" - step DOWN with the "bad" leg.

    I hope this might be useful. . . !!
     
  9. Taffy

    Taffy Registered User

    Apr 15, 2007
    1,314
    Hello Susie,
    Just like to say that I hope everything goes really well and that your mum recovers quickly and without setbacks. I think it's great that your mum will have someone familiar around her all the time. Best Wishes Taffy.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.