I really need legal advice to help my father, can anyone help?

Discussion in 'Legal and financial issues' started by underwood, Oct 9, 2015.

  1. garnuft

    garnuft Registered User

    Sep 7, 2012
    6,585
    Read your own link properly.

    It clearly differentiates between opioids, NSAIDS(ibuprofen) and paracetamol.


    Sent from my iPhone using Talking Point
     
  2. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,784
    Female
    London
    #82 Beate, Oct 15, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2015
    Well, I've read the above and it quite clearly says paracetamol is a standard painkiller:
    "Opiate painkillers are available either from doctors on prescription; or, in relatively low doses over-the-counter, at a pharmacy, combined with aspirin, ibuprofen or paracetamol.They are intended to be used for a limited period of time to treat pain that does not respond to standard effective painkillers like aspirin, ibuprofen and paracetamol.

    I've actually been told that paracetamol is safe to give to just about everyone including the elderly and pregnant, and the painkiller of choice for people who can't always communicate pain accurately.

    Plus, I can get OH to bed in under 15 minutes. His head hits the pillow, he's asleep.
     
  3. garnuft

    garnuft Registered User

    Sep 7, 2012
    6,585
  4. underwood

    underwood Registered User

    Oct 9, 2015
    48
    Nottingham
    Which paracetamol do the NHS use?
     
  5. garnuft

    garnuft Registered User

    Sep 7, 2012
    6,585
  6. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,732
    Well i stand corrected and well done you but there is NO way that i could get my ma anywhere close to bed in under 45 minutes from table to wash, to sorting out legs etc. However, we didn't rush because I feel it is an important time before sleep to settle people and if Underwoods dad is already unhappy and unsettled then one would hope that the carers would take time and care and interest enough to do this at a measured pace. I spoke to a lady just yesterday who was almost in tears saying "why do they keep rushing at me, they rush, they make me hurry, I don't like it. It upsets me I like to take my time". What an awful reflection on our society that the speed of care is more important than love and tenderness. Just my opnion please don't shout at me!
     
  7. underwood

    underwood Registered User

    Oct 9, 2015
    48
    Nottingham
    Hi Fizzie

    Thank you :)
     
  8. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    8,310
    Yorkshire
    Underwood, are you OK?
    Please be careful of mixing the painkillers and drink - not interested in suing you, just want to be sure you live to fight another day ;)
     
  9. fizzie

    fizzie Registered User

    Jul 20, 2011
    2,732
    you are very welcome. Please don't get distressed. You have so much happening in your life and I can just feel how hard you are trying to make it alright for your family. Just keep going, just keep posting and keep feeling the love that we are sending out to you x
     
  10. underwood

    underwood Registered User

    Oct 9, 2015
    48
    Nottingham
    #90 underwood, Oct 15, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 16, 2015
    OK so fueled with codiene and now 3 glasses of wine Oh yes folks, not only pig headed but a lush!

    Paracetamol has caused a stir.

    Try this!
    Alzheimer’s Disease Or Paracetamol Side Effects?

    Date: 19 April, 2013

    Is there a link between Alzheimer’s symptoms and the use of paracetamol?

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen), the widely used over-the-counter painkiller, is the wine gums of the drugs industry. People pop them on a daily basis without giving it a second thought.

    Here at the Daily Health we’ve been warning you about the dangers of paracetamol for years. Frankly, this drug is anything but harmless.

    Yet, it’s somewhat shocking to learn that paracetamol might be the cause of one of today’s most dreaded diseases.

    Peeling back the meds

    About 15 years ago, researchers investigating arthritis pain relievers noticed something odd. Paracetamol use appeared to be linked to Alzheimer’s risk.

    That’s staggering. Especially when you consider that in a recent survey, one in five people said they were “heavy users” of the drug. Many said they took it EVERY day.

    If the Alzheimer’s and dementia danger were ONLY in paracetamol, that would be a crisis. But according to a new Wall St. Journal report, it’s just one link in a long chain.

    Make that a VERY long chain. More than 100 drugs can mimic dementia symptoms.

    With some of these drugs, there’s no surprise. They have a direct effect on the brain.

    Several sleep aids, tranquilizers, painkillers, and anti-psychotic drugs made the list. But also included are drugs for incontinence, acid-reflux, and blood pressure.

    One doctor said that cognitive symptoms “vanish” in many cases when medication is stopped. He added… “I have had people referred to me with a clear history of dementia and when I started to peel back the medications, they were much better.”

    Another specialist put it more bluntly… “Every Alzheimer’s expert living today has been fooled.”

    You can say the same about many doctors. They dole out pills like sweets for their elderly patients. The result… A recent study found that 30 per cent of Alzheimer’s patients might be misdiagnosed.

    If you’re the caretaker of someone with dementia or Alzheimer’s, talk to their doctor about this immediately. Reducing their medications might work a miracle.

    Of course, Alzheimer’s patients who discontinue drugs may not find dementia relief.

    Don’t despair. Many health issues also mimic Alzheimer’s, so there’s still hope.

    Vitamin deficiency is common. Alzheimer’s patients are typically deficient in these nutrients…

    * Calcium
    * Iron
    * Zinc
    * Vitamin A
    * Vitamin K
    * Omega-3 fatty acids

    Very low sodium levels presents another problem. How many elderly people do you know who avoid salt?

    Um… ALL of them? Okay, that might be a slight exaggeration.

    Three sodium deficiency symptoms are similar to dementia symptoms… confusion, fatigue, and poor balance.

    Never accept an Alzheimer’s or dementia diagnosis at face value. First try to eliminate all the other things that might contribute to your symptoms.

    Cocodomol gets you talking, I wouldn't care I only fell 12 feet!!!! but shivver me timbers.
     
  11. Annie C

    Annie C Registered User

    Oct 14, 2015
    39
    Wales
    #91 Annie C, Oct 15, 2015
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2015
    In case this is helpful ... I take Cocodamol on prescription, a combination of Codeine (an opioid) and Paracetamol (properly acetaminophen and not an opioid) ... the mechanism of action of the two is quite different which is why they can safely be combined. And yes, I do know for sure.

    Edited to add that I am slightly confused by the dose you describe. There is a prescribed upper limit for paracetamol as just a small overdose can cause liver damage. The maximum amount of paracetamol for adults is 1 gram (1000 mg) per dose and 4 grams (4000 mg) per day.
     
  12. underwood

    underwood Registered User

    Oct 9, 2015
    48
    Nottingham
    Annie, thank you,
    However, my father has a urinary infection.
    Depending on which paracetamol and which derivatives, where do the NHS aquire their paracetamol from?
     
  13. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,784
    Female
    London
    OH wasn't on a single medication when he was diagnosed. Plus, he hardly ever takes painkillers. As with every medical article, read with caution.
    Paracetamol is Paracetamol. Stop getting paranoid.
     
  14. Annie C

    Annie C Registered User

    Oct 14, 2015
    39
    Wales
    I'm sorry, I have no idea where they source it. But I do know it is commonly prescribed to deal with the pain and discomfort of UTIs
     
  15. underwood

    underwood Registered User

    Oct 9, 2015
    48
    Nottingham
    Thank you Annie, but the hospital discharged to the care home and there was no mention of him having UTI or delirium. SS knew about it 'bed blocking' but care home do not!
     
  16. Annie C

    Annie C Registered User

    Oct 14, 2015
    39
    Wales
    I'm not sure you understood me, UTI is Urinary Tract Infection. You did state he had/possibly still has a urinary infection?
     
  17. theunknown

    theunknown Registered User

    Apr 17, 2015
    385
    I agree with what you say stanley. I said to my mum that it wouldn't come to this, because we have two sheds and she could have one of those (joke obviously), but the fact that I said that meant that she knew that I didn't want her to end her life in a care home. I never thought it would come to that. However, if you get to that stage, and dementia is involved, it's taken out of your hands if the person involved is sectioned. The thing is, I now realise that there's no way she would still be safe without specialist care. She's in a closed dementia unit, but we can come and go as we please (she's never been diagnosed with dementia, but with 'irreversible cognitive impairment'). The thing is, several months down the line, I can't imagine my mum being able to be safe with relatives, never mind in her own home, and I didn't even realise there was a problem with this 'til Spring of this year.

    In some ways I think I was lucky (as my mum's next of kin) that the choice was taken out of my hands. As for 'deprivation of liberty', it's a very emotive phrase. From what I've experienced, it's actually designed to make sure nobody is 'locked up' without very good reasons that can be challenged in court. The more the person (at least for now; who knows the way things are going) is deprived of liberty, the greater rights they have to legal representation.
     
  18. underwood

    underwood Registered User

    Oct 9, 2015
    48
    Nottingham
    I did Annie, I'm having a bad day. Fell 12 feet!
    My father has had a UTI since June on and off, also a blood infection. Blood cleared, UTI 20 days ago was stil there when he was sent from hospital to care home. UTI not disclosed to care home!

    I did understand, but am having a very bad day! Sorry:eek:
     
  19. SerenaS

    SerenaS Administrator
    Staff Member

    Apr 7, 2011
    13,277
    London
    Hello everyone,

    Some members may have noticed that this thread was temporarily closed last night. This action was taken to halt posting to the discussion, given the sensitivity of the discussion topic.

    The vast majority of posts made to this discussion have been constructive and the topic has been of interest to a number of members. We have decided to reopen the thread so that the discussion can continue. We’d ask all members to please bear the sensitivity of the discussion topic in mind before posting and, as always, to ensure that you post within the rules of this forum which can be viewed here.

    We will be keeping an eye on the discussion and I'm afraid if unhelpful or inappropriate posts are made, it may be necessary to close the discussion.

    Thank you
     
  20. Rageddy Anne

    Rageddy Anne Registered User

    Feb 21, 2013
    5,984
    Cotswolds
    Must echo Beate's input. My husband never took any medication of any sort and was diagnosed with Alzheimer's which has progressed for several years. Only recently has he taken Paracetamol, and then only very occasionally.
     

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