1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. cgarc61

    cgarc61 Registered User

    Jul 7, 2015
    4
    Im wondering if anyone has this issue going on ..my husband has been doing this random whistling all day for many months now. He does stop when I tell him but begins again not soon after he stops. He does have a neurological appoint ment soon which I will address this issue but was just wondering if anyone has experienced this problem with their loved one. thanks:)
     
  2. Emily M

    Emily M Registered User

    Jan 20, 2015
    178
    Sorry to hear of your husband's problems. My Mum didn't whistle but became very obsessive and repetitive asking the same question over and over again. Your husband's behaviour seems similar in that it is repetitive and he may be unaware of what he is doing. It is good that he has an appointment soon because if there is a problem the sooner you have a diagnosis the better so you can draw on the help and resources available.

    Good luck

    EM
     
  3. jeany123

    jeany123 Registered User

    Mar 24, 2012
    19,049
    Durham
    My husband whistles a lot of the time, it is usually a tune, it can give me quite a shock if I am sitting quietly or think he is asleep and he suddenly starts to whistle, some of them are quite high pitched, he has done this for a number of years now,
     
  4. Lawson58

    Lawson58 Registered User

    My OH has days when he sings and it is always the same song 'Beautiful Dreamer' by Stephen Foster. He can't sing for peanuts but on the days when he isn't singing, he doesn't stop talking so I don't know which is worse. But perhaps your OH is whistling instead of talking.

    I sometimes hear my OH singing to the dog in the middle of the night. Same song!
     
  5. jeany123

    jeany123 Registered User

    Mar 24, 2012
    19,049
    Durham
    Yes Lawson my husband is either singing, whistling or talking as well he is rarely quiet, he has one or two songs,
     
  6. cragmaid

    cragmaid Registered User

    Oct 18, 2010
    7,963
    North East England
    With my late Mum, it was either SSSSS type whistling, tuneless but irritating or...and this drove me really batty,:mad: tapping her fingernails on anything but especially her china beaker!!!! GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR:(:mad::mad::mad::mad: :D
     
  7. cgarc61

    cgarc61 Registered User

    Jul 7, 2015
    4
    Thanks for your reply this is first time using this forum not sure if im doing this right? he hasn't been diagnosed with anything other than neuropathy but this time he is to get memory meds
     
  8. cgarc61

    cgarc61 Registered User

    Jul 7, 2015
    4
    Thanks for replying this is just so irritating even our grandchildren tell him to be quiet!
     
  9. cgarc61

    cgarc61 Registered User

    Jul 7, 2015
    4
    Thanks my husband hasn't been diagnosed with anything yet I'm just perplexed as to what this is about. There is not a specific song its just this whistling and it gets loud at times. I will ask his neurologist if something else is going on to cause this.
     
  10. Kjn

    Kjn Registered User

    Jul 27, 2013
    5,835
    My dad taps fingers or hand on arm of chair/couch/whatever , kinda tap-tap-tap , he does it a lot! Drives mum mad:rolleyes::D
     
  11. Emily M

    Emily M Registered User

    Jan 20, 2015
    178

    Sorry for my ignorance but I am not a medical person and don't know much about neuropathy except that I thought it is a general term for a number of different disorders. I was assuming his neuropathy is related to dementia / Alzheimer's and wonder if his memory medication is something to do with this. It is just that with a specific diagnosis for dementia 'Alzheimer's he may be entitled to certain benefits and help. This would be particularly useful in the future as it is a degenerative disease and will get worse over time. Why not ask your doctor if you are not sure about any aspect of his neuropathy.

    There is no right or wrong way to use the forum. Keep posting if you need help or just if you want to vent your feelings. I have found this forum very helpful.

    Best wishes, EM
     
  12. EdenDesjardins

    EdenDesjardins Registered User

    May 25, 2015
    19
    Is talkativeness and compulsive whistling a sign of AD? Whistling impulsively I can understand would be a neurologic condition but why talkativeness?
     
  13. Spamar

    Spamar Registered User

    Oct 5, 2013
    6,841
    Suffolk
    Just to say that OH used to whistle an awful lot. As dementia took hold, whistling disappeared. I would give anything to hear it again!
     
  14. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,338
    Female
    South coast
    It may be a complete coincidence, but my hubby has recently been told that he probably has frontotemperal dementia (FTD). One of the main symptoms is obsessional and repetitive behavior. Hubby also has neuropathy and, apparently, motor problems are very common with FTD.
    But, as I said - it might be just coincidence.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.