1. Expert Q&A: Living well as a carer - Thurs 29 August, 3-4pm

    As a carer for a person living with dementia, the needs of the person you care for will often come before your own. You may experience a range of difficult emotions and you may not have the time to do all the things you need to do. Caring can have a big impact on both your mental and physical health, as well as your overall wellbeing.

    Angelo, our Knowledge Officer (Wellbeing) is our expert on this topic. He will be here to answer your questions on Thursday 29 August between 3-4pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

How to stop difficult behaviour

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Catastrophe, Jun 29, 2019.

  1. Catastrophe

    Catastrophe Registered User

    Feb 15, 2019
    23
    Hi My first post, I care for my Dad who has altzeimers. He has locked in his mind he is freezing cold, the hotter it gets the more blankets he wraps himself in. He turns on the central heating and turns it up to 30 degrees, despite sweat running off him. The hotter he gets the more confused he gets and the more dehydrated he gets, the more he says he is cold. Any suggestions on how to break the cycle would be welcome.
     
  2. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,125
    Kent
    Welcome to dementia Talking Point @Catastrophe

    I wish I could help.

    I remember in weather like this when I tried to encourage my husband to sit in the garden he insisted on wearing a fleece and being covered with a blanket.

    We also had the heating on at full blast.

    I don`t know if it`s something to do with poorly controlled body temperature or not. I have a friend who is diabetic but doesn`t have dementia. She is always cold. My husband was diabetic too.
     
  3. Catastrophe

    Catastrophe Registered User

    Feb 15, 2019
    23
    If he truly was cold I would not worry. But as he shows all the signs of someone who is too hot, such as his skin is warm to touch, he is sweating and his face and ears are quite red. Have checked his temperature incase its an infection, but it's fine. He just seems to not be able to differenciate between being hot or being cold. As he over heats he gets more and more confused.
     
  4. margherita

    margherita Registered User

    May 30, 2017
    2,409
    Female
    Italy, Milan and Acqui Terme
    Couldn't you lock in somewhere blankets and his winter clothes? Heatstrokes are dangerous. Let him complain about being cold. Whatever his personal perception is, you now it is not real.
     
  5. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,881
    Female
    South coast
    I think it is very likely that he is confusing the sensations of being hot and cold.

    My OH is no longer aware of when he is tired, or hungry, hot or cold.
    Its never easy
     
  6. reedysue

    reedysue Registered User

    Nov 4, 2014
    4,587
    Scotland
    My mum has spent the heatwave wearing a fleece trousers and a fleece top, at night she slept in her clothes under a duvet and 3 huge fleece throws. Any attempt to get her to wear something cooler of remove the throws was met by extreme anger.
     
  7. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,752
    Female
    Scotland
    My husband constantly complains of cold, Rubbing his hands to get warm, wrapped in a rug in his armchair, exclaiming at the "freezing" toilet seat, cold water in his glass, stainless steel cutlery.

    There is definitely an excessive reaction to even mild coldness with this illness.
     
  8. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,414
    Female
    My mother (in a care home) is always cold. Last summer during the heatwave I bought her some lightweight summer pyjamas. A few days later I visited to find her wearing a long sleeved top, thick hooded winter jumper, and sitting under a fleece blanket! Don't think those pyjamas will ever get worn.

    I can see why it's so worrying for you as your father becomes overheated and dehydrated, but not sure what you can do about it. Will he accept cold drinks?
     
  9. Rach1985

    Rach1985 Registered User

    Jun 9, 2019
    398
    My Dad lit a fire last week (in the fireplace) because he was cold. Whilst it was cooler for June it wasn’t fire lighting temperature
    Sorry not got any advice just reaffirming what other have said that it does seem common in Alzheimer’s
     
  10. Palerider

    Palerider Registered User

    Aug 9, 2015
    444
    Male
    North West
    Yesterday we broke down having just done a quick stop at the local. Mid day the sun beaming down, there we both were stuck in the right hand lane leading into a roundabout. Mum in her infinite wisdom had a vest, thin jumper, cardigan and coat on as she maintained she was 'cold'. A kind Polish man stopped and help me push the car to a safe place, luckily in the shade while we waited. After two hours of waiting for the RAC man to turn up she had stripped to her jumper -after some considerable persuasion and the temp reaching 31 degrees on the car thermometer.
     
  11. Rob_E

    Rob_E Registered User

    Feb 1, 2015
    162
    Male
    Liverpool
    #11 Rob_E, Jun 30, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2019
    Mum is the same. Two winter duvets and insists on having her electric blanket on, whatever time of year it is. She came in from outside earlier saying she had to get in, as it was so cold! It's 21c. The one time she does get warm is when eating. And she certainly lets us know about it! Puffing, blowing, moaning groaning, what to me and everyone else is a complete overreaction. But in her confused world I have no doubt it really does feel that bad.
     
  12. Rach1985

    Rach1985 Registered User

    Jun 9, 2019
    398
    22 degrees here in Leicester today Dad just said to me it’s getting a bit chilly isn’t it. I’ve told him not to light the fire, just hope he remembers whilst I walk the dog!
     
  13. Duggies-girl

    Duggies-girl Registered User

    Sep 6, 2017
    1,470
    I popped home for 20 minutes and yes when I came back dad had shut all the windows, I have since reopened them. It was the same last year in the heatwave. Baffles me.
     
  14. Jale

    Jale Registered User

    Jul 9, 2018
    233
    Female
    Mum always says she's cold, but she doesn't feel it, and if a window is open she always says there's a force 9 gale blowing in, but if she can't see the window open like the one at the back of her she says I don't know where it's coming from but there is a lovely breeze.

    Don't know what you could apart from try and make sure that your Dad stays hydrated.
     
  15. Rob_E

    Rob_E Registered User

    Feb 1, 2015
    162
    Male
    Liverpool
    Another favourite is feeling radiators and being amazed that they are cold. "what's wrong with this radiator?". This will be during a heatwave. Mum was always one to feel the cold but as with many things, she has become alot more sensitive since dementia.
     
  16. Palerider

    Palerider Registered User

    Aug 9, 2015
    444
    Male
    North West
    In the winter mum packs paper very methodically round the cracks in the doors to stop the draft, we often end up locked in the living room in fear of opening the door and all the packing falls out, she always talks about grandad being exactly the same -he hated a draft
     
  17. Rach1985

    Rach1985 Registered User

    Jun 9, 2019
    398
    When you say as with many things, does this mean more sensitive to sounds also?
    My dad is as deaf as a post, he had the tv volume on 82 the other day, but when the house was quiet later on and I dropped the cheese grater on the floor you would think I’d set a bomb off by his reaction to it. He genuinely jumped up in the air and made a really loud angry noise like what was that?!
     
  18. Palerider

    Palerider Registered User

    Aug 9, 2015
    444
    Male
    North West
    mums exactly the same....deaf on some things and fine with noise she wants...the moment there is another noise the world comes to an end
     
  19. Rob_E

    Rob_E Registered User

    Feb 1, 2015
    162
    Male
    Liverpool
    #19 Rob_E, Jun 30, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2019
    Yes, sounds is another, though not at the moment as she has ear wax and we are waiting for the drops to work so she have them treated at the clinic this week. Administering the drops is another story! Even things like when she is in the car with me, if I accelerate too hard she gets anxious, she is generally a lot less tolerant to any kind of sensation. I think some of it is anxiety based, one of the symptoms of anxiety is 'over sensitisation', as I know only too well from my own experience, the medication she is on for that seems to have taken the edge off it at least.
     
  20. Palerider

    Palerider Registered User

    Aug 9, 2015
    444
    Male
    North West
    I was wondering if there is a link between dementia and the hypothalamus (part of the brain that regulates temperature) -does anyone know? Might be worth a look to see if there is a link??
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.