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How to shop after Power of Attorney invoked on bank account??? Ideas anyone?

Clemmy

Registered User
Aug 14, 2015
15
Surrey
Hello - this is my first post here, so thanks in advance for your input.

Does anyone have any experience/bright ideas about financially facilitating food shops for my aunt who has dementia but has full-time live in care. I am at the stage that I need to move from 3rd party authority on my aunt's bank accounts to take over Power of Attorney and full control. My aunt insists on going to Sainsburys once a week (practically her only outing some weeks so I want her to continue to do this as long as she is physically capable, but once the bank insist on taking away her Debit Card I need a good method to allow her and her carers to pay for the shopping - ideally that is secure and doesn't have pin codes!! At the moment I already write all the cheques and take care of large cost items/repairs - or my aunt's carers have recourse to a locked Kitty that they have the key to. I want a way to fund the shopping when I am working remotely from my aunt and her carers. I use online shopping occassionally to send bulky items or things my aunt won't buy but are needed by the carers for the household.

One of the lovely ladies on the Alzheimers Society's helpline suggested a Sainsbury's Shopping Card which looks, after some research and a call to Sainsburys, practically perfect. Has anyone used it? You can top up online up to £75 a time, but can top up in store up to £750. Looks very good as it doesn't require a PIN number, there are 2 cards and if cards get lost they can be replaced. Can be used by both my aunt and her carers, or by one of the carers without my aunt. Any thoughts or experience with these anyone.

Also does anyone have any experience on taking over someone's bank account as Power of Attorney but wanting to facilitate some financial independence for someone who is cared for at home. The bank in question seems to have a default position of removing someone's debit cards straight away once Power of Attorney is invoked. They don't seem to realise that there are degrees of mental capacity and that not everyone wants to move in to a home when they have dementia, yet need increasing support to retain some semblance of independence.

Thanks.
 

Pegsdaughter

Registered User
Oct 7, 2014
128
London
I have bought these cards for clients and they are very easy to use they just swipe them and deduct the amount at the till. I would recommend it.


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Clemmy

Registered User
Aug 14, 2015
15
Surrey
Thanks - Sainsbury Shopping Cards

Hi Pegs daughter - sorry I didn't notice your reply back then in August.

I have just started using the Sainsbury Shopping Card with my aunt and her carers - they have done a shop and I must say it looks like a Gift From the God's in relation to relatives and friends helping people with dementia and their carers in having a payment mechanism that doesn't involve cash or debit cards!!

I noticed when I got the card that Sainsbury's seems to be changing the designs on the front of the cards - they seems to think that these cards are for families for maintainance payments or students at uni/college having food payments from parents - yet I think they are really missing a marketing trick and should retain an older person friendly design as this this payment mechanism is wonderful for older people as it involves no pin number and relatives/POA can top up the card regularly - they can't use the card anywhere else so although they could buy anything on sale in Sainsburys including booze and cigarettes this is a fabulously helpful offering!! I hasten to add I have nothing to do with Sainsbury's but this card is great for live in carers and other supporters.

A big hurrah! It is the small logistic items that can be hugely difficult to sort out but when they do it goes like clockwork.

I have bought these cards for clients and they are very easy to use they just swipe them and deduct the amount at the till. I would recommend it.


Sent from my iPad using Talking Point
 

Bod

Registered User
Aug 30, 2013
1,236
Hello - this is my first post here, so thanks in advance for your input.

Does anyone have any experience/bright ideas about financially facilitating food shops for my aunt who has dementia but has full-time live in care. I am at the stage that I need to move from 3rd party authority on my aunt's bank accounts to take over Power of Attorney and full control. My aunt insists on going to Sainsburys once a week (practically her only outing some weeks so I want her to continue to do this as long as she is physically capable, but once the bank insist on taking away her Debit Card I need a good method to allow her and her carers to pay for the shopping - ideally that is secure and doesn't have pin codes!! At the moment I already write all the cheques and take care of large cost items/repairs - or my aunt's carers have recourse to a locked Kitty that they have the key to. I want a way to fund the shopping when I am working remotely from my aunt and her carers. I use online shopping occassionally to send bulky items or things my aunt won't buy but are needed by the carers for the household.

One of the lovely ladies on the Alzheimers Society's helpline suggested a Sainsbury's Shopping Card which looks, after some research and a call to Sainsburys, practically perfect. Has anyone used it? You can top up online up to £75 a time, but can top up in store up to £750. Looks very good as it doesn't require a PIN number, there are 2 cards and if cards get lost they can be replaced. Can be used by both my aunt and her carers, or by one of the carers without my aunt. Any thoughts or experience with these anyone.

Also does anyone have any experience on taking over someone's bank account as Power of Attorney but wanting to facilitate some financial independence for someone who is cared for at home. The bank in question seems to have a default position of removing someone's debit cards straight away once Power of Attorney is invoked. They don't seem to realise that there are degrees of mental capacity and that not everyone wants to move in to a home when they have dementia, yet need increasing support to retain some semblance of independence.

Thanks.
Contact the bank, ask what their policy is.
You may have the choice as to how many cards to have, all will have both names on.
Beware though, if she has full access then she can spend ALL of it, you may not know, till too late.

Bod
 

Pickles53

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
2,474
Radcliffe on Trent
Contact the bank, ask what their policy is.
You may have the choice as to how many cards to have, all will have both names on.
Beware though, if she has full access then she can spend ALL of it, you may not know, till too late.

Bod
If you are at the stage where you are invoking the LPA, you have the legal responsibility to protect the donor's finances even if that means preventing or limiting their access to their own money. The bank may allow you to place some limits on amounts which can be withdrawn in cash, but if a person still has and can use a debit card it's to see how there could be any limits in place on what they spend.