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how to get help for my sister, GP won't visit

Tambomabel

New member
Oct 22, 2021
2
0
Hiya
I've been trying to get help for my sister. I've tried lots of different ways but still am no further forward.
Because she is coping at the moment and she is not that bad. She has good days and bad days. More bad days. The doctor won't come out to see her. She's now putting all of her belongings outside of the house and people are taking them. She leaves her front door open all night. She has mood swings and makes no sense. She thinks she is moving so she is putting her things outside.
 

ClaireeW

Registered User
Sep 22, 2021
31
0
Hi @Tambomabel Where is your sister living? Have you asked your local Adult Social Service for an assessment? She is very vulnerable isn't she, losing her possessions and leaving her door open at night? She is termed "an adult at risk"

Who may be at risk of abuse or neglect?​

Under the Care Act 2014, specific adult safeguarding duties apply to any adult (18 years or over) who:

  • has care and support needs and,
  • is experiencing, or is at risk of, abuse or neglect and,
  • is unable to protect themselves because of their care and support needs.
Local authorities also have safeguarding responsibilities for carers and a general duty to promote the wellbeing of the wider population in the communities they serve.

Safeguarding duties apply regardless of whether a person’s care and support needs are being met, whether by the local authority or anyone else. They also apply to people who pay for their own care and support services.

An adult with care and support needs may be:

  • a person with a physical disability, a learning difficulty or a sensory impairment,
  • someone with mental health needs, including dementia or a personality disorder,
  • a person with a long-term health condition,
  • someone who misuses substances or alcohol to the extent that it affects their ability to manage day-to-day living.
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
10,963
0
Yorkshire
hello @Tambomabel
a warm welcome to DTP

leaving belongings outside and the door open all night ... that's a worry

contact your sister's Local Authority Adult Services and tell them what's happening ... say your sister is a 'vulnerable adult' who is putting herself 'at risk of harm' because of her behaviour, indeed, you believe leaving the door open at night is a 'safeguarding issue' ... the phrases in '' should get their attention

sadly, it seems many GPs are reluctant or unable to make house visits ... contact them in writing, listing out each concern you have and how long each has been going on and how often, then send regular updates... suggest the GP invite your sister in for a flu jab or well woman check up ... some do act, others wait until their patient contacts them, but at least you will be flagging up your concerns, and GPs have to note information given by a family member, though they may not discuss the situation with you due to patient confidentiality

if possible, help your sister organise LPAs ... having these in place will give her Attorneys the legal authority to help her
 

Tambomabel

New member
Oct 22, 2021
2
0
Hi @Tambomabel Where is your sister living? Have you asked your local Adult Social Service for an assessment? She is very vulnerable isn't she, losing her possessions and leaving her door open at night? She is termed "an adult at risk"

Who may be at risk of abuse or neglect?​

Under the Care Act 2014, specific adult safeguarding duties apply to any adult (18 years or over) who:

  • has care and support needs and,
  • is experiencing, or is at risk of, abuse or neglect and,
  • is unable to protect themselves because of their care and support needs.
Local authorities also have safeguarding responsibilities for carers and a general duty to promote the wellbeing of the wider population in the communities they serve.

Safeguarding duties apply regardless of whether a person’s care and support needs are being met, whether by the local authority or anyone else. They also apply to people who pay for their own care and support services.

An adult with care and support needs may be:

  • a person with a physical disability, a learning difficulty or a sensory impairment,
  • someone with mental health needs, including dementia or a personality disorder,
  • a person with a long-term health condition,
  • someone who misuses substances or alcohol to the extent that it affects their ability to manage day-to-day living.
Good morning
We have tried everything to get her help. She's been assessed and because she has mental capacity she's been assessed as capable of managing herself. We as a family know that she is very vulnerable and poorly but it's as if they never see her at her worst and decide that she is OK. Her doctor hasn't assessed her or been out to see her. The local medical centres do nothing. I've tried everything.
She's getting worse but makes out its everyone else who's picking on her. I'm lost at what to do next. She's convinced that she is moving soon so is giving away all her belongings. My poor mom is very poorly and is trying to manage on her own.
Are there any other helpful organisations I can get in touch with.
Kind regards
 

imthedaughter

Registered User
Apr 3, 2019
693
0
Good morning
We have tried everything to get her help. She's been assessed and because she has mental capacity she's been assessed as capable of managing herself. We as a family know that she is very vulnerable and poorly but it's as if they never see her at her worst and decide that she is OK. Her doctor hasn't assessed her or been out to see her. The local medical centres do nothing. I've tried everything.
She's getting worse but makes out its everyone else who's picking on her. I'm lost at what to do next. She's convinced that she is moving soon so is giving away all her belongings. My poor mom is very poorly and is trying to manage on her own.
Are there any other helpful organisations I can get in touch with.
Kind regards
She may have had capacity when assessed then but seems different now - capacity flucuates. She could have an infection or she could be getting worse (not sure what if any diagnosis has been made).
Call social services and tell them you can't help her and that she is leaving the door open etc - she is their responsibility. No one with full capacity would think they were moving when they were not or leave their door open/belongings outside.