1. Expert Q&A: Protecting a person with dementia from financial abuse - Weds 26 June, 3:30-4:30 pm

    Financial abuse can have serious consequences for a person with dementia. Find out how to protect a person with dementia from financial abuse.

    Sam, our Knowledge Officer (Legal and Welfare Rights) is our expert on this topic. She will be here to answer your questions on Wednesday 26 June between 3:30 - 4:30 pm.

    You can either post questions >here< or email them to us at talkingpoint@alzheimers.org.uk and we'll answer as many as we can on the day.

  1. scousergirl

    scousergirl Registered User

    Sep 13, 2015
    3
    #1 scousergirl, Sep 13, 2015
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2015
    My mom 93 had a stroke (they think)nearly 2 years ago leaving her with asphasia, and some memory loss.we placed her in residential care where she was settling...communication was difficult but she could walk with cane, dress and use bathroom, eat well and she is vision impaired. 6 months ago she fell, went into hospital, no damages but perhaps a TIA. She was there 6 weeks as she would not eat or try to walk, very agitated and needed one on one care due to falls out of bed. She was discharged with some dementia signs into a nursing home. We felt she would pass soon as she was not eating and drinking a little. She has had UTI's and chest infections, drinks little and brings up mucus. She has lost half her body weight and gets bruises.
    She calls out to her mother, sisters (deceased) and once said she was terrified.
    The NH and GP will not confirm end of life, but how long must she suffer like this?
    I live overseas, have been over twice this year and worry about when to leave my family and come back for her last days. She seems to know my sister but not any grandkids who have visited or any photos.
     
  2. Cat27

    Cat27 Volunteer Moderator

    Feb 27, 2015
    9,768
    Merseyside
    Welcome to TP. :)

    Nobody can answer your question unfortunately.
    It's horrible to watch loved ones suffer.
     
  3. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    7,465
    Yorkshire
    You are very welcome to TP scousergirl - sorry you had to find us under such sad circumstances.

    I can't offer any answers, I'm afraid, just wanted to let you know your post is being read.

    When you have some time have a general mooch round the threads, you will find some that will help you, I'm sure.
     
  4. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,390
    Female
    South coast
    Im afraid that there are no answers scousergirl.
    My MIL reached that stage and we were told to expect the worst on three separate occasions, only for her to bounce back. Ive had a couple of times with mum when the doctors started muttering darkly about end of life care, but she is still in her CH, chattering and shuffling around.
    On the other hand she could pass within a week or two.

    Ive always said that the diagnosis of dementia should come with a crystal ball......
     
  5. scousergirl

    scousergirl Registered User

    Sep 13, 2015
    3
    Thanks for replying...I know nobody can help answer the question when she will pass but its good to know people are out there...actually I was looking for frontal lobal dementia...my BIL was diagnosed 4 years ago at 57, and is now in a secure hospital.They think he cannot last much longer but I have started to worry about the inherited gene aspect. My hubby is 66 and no signs of dementia
     
  6. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,390
    Female
    South coast
    FTD is no different in that no-one knows how long they can last. There is one member on here who is still posting and he has had FTD for 16 years (or thereabouts)

    My OH is being investigated for FTD and I have been told that only a small percentage of people with FTD have the genetic type.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.