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how long a person with MCI or early Alzhemeher can stay in early stage?

human4

Registered User
Jun 15, 2021
25
0
i know there is no rule but really want to get some hope.

how to ensure my 74 year old father who has recently been diagnosed with MCI and early stage of Alzhemeher - can stay in this early stage for as long as possible? what type of years can he remain stable like today?

please let me know your experiences...

thanks all...
 

Linbrusco

Registered User
Mar 4, 2013
1,684
0
Auckland...... New Zealand
My Dad at age 77 was diagnosed with MCI in 2014. His ACE memory/language/cogition test was 84/100.
His memory deteriorated by 2017, and this was upgraded to Mild Mixed dementia with ACE score of 73/100 and he was started on 10mg Donepezil daily.
Dad went into care Oct 2020 mainly due to safety reasons, but he was also diagnosed with 3 life threatening health conditions. .
His ACE score was 64/100 and upgraded to mild/ moderate mixed dementia.
 

human4

Registered User
Jun 15, 2021
25
0
really very heart breaking journey to read and thanks for sharing it. plus my dad cannot be diagnosed in india effectively as to what is his score and what type of dementia he has. i am not clear how without any tests - purely based on symptoms and MRI and CT scan dad was told he has alzhemeher.
 

CardiffGirlInEssex

Registered User
Oct 6, 2018
321
0
The scans are probably the most definitive part of the diagnosis as they clearly show the damage to the brain. My mothers diagnosis was only made definite once she she had had a CT scan of her brain.
 

Duggies-girl

Registered User
Sep 6, 2017
2,725
0
My mum told me about dads memory some time before she died, she said he would not cope on his own. After she died it became obvious that there was a problem, most likely MCI but within a couple of years it was obvious that it was dementia. We muddled through until 2017 when we finally got dad diagnosed with early stage alzhiemers after a worrying incident and he scored 75/100 Dad muddled along for another couple of years with a lot of support from me (I had to stop working then) until 2019 when he had a bout of pneumonia and ended up in hospital for three weeks.

Up until then he was in a very slow decline but the hospital stay really caused a big decline mentally and physically and I had to move in with dad. He had another year at home before he died in 2020 If he had not had the pneumonia and also a cancer diagnosis in 2018 I believe his decline would have been a lot slower and he would probably still be muddling along with me right behind him.

It is different for everyone but I think routine is very important, my dad did the same things everyday like clockwork. It was only when his driving became severely bad that I had to step in. Upsets of any kind can cause problems, like my dad losing his very battered car, I think that set him into a bit of a decline. Holidays can eventually cause upset as can changing things in the house, it can be disorientating for somebody with dementia. Keep him healthy as hospitals are not good places for people with dementia. I took dad out regularly but always to the same places for lunch and if we went for a walk it would always be the same walk.

Keep posting on here because there will usually be someone with some good advice and it is just a good place to come.
 

Countryboy

Registered User
Mar 17, 2005
1,656
0
South West
i know there is no rule but really want to get some hope.

how to ensure my 74 year old father who has recently been diagnosed with MCI and early stage of Alzhemeher - can stay in this early stage for as long as possible? what type of years can he remain stable like today?

please let me know your experiences...

thanks all...
it’s a difficult question because no two people diagnosed with dementia are the same in their own personal acceptance of the condition any for many other reasons, however I was diagnosed with MCI or mild Alzheimer’s 22 years ago o_O next month July 1999 ok I was also diagnosed with FTD in 2003 I’m not sure and not bothered how others seem me Personally I feel great I live my life the way I want to live my life ok I will take advise but any final decisions are mine I carry out my own risk assessment in relation to covid-19 and take preclusions as and when I see fit at the age of 78 :cool: I afford to waste my remaining years locking myself away or being scared of what might happen live every day as its my last because one day it will.:):)
 

human4

Registered User
Jun 15, 2021
25
0
it’s a difficult question because no two people diagnosed with dementia are the same in their own personal acceptance of the condition any for many other reasons, however I was diagnosed with MCI or mild Alzheimer’s 22 years ago o_O next month July 1999 ok I was also diagnosed with FTD in 2003 I’m not sure and not bothered how others seem me Personally I feel great I live my life the way I want to live my life ok I will take advise but any final decisions are mine I carry out my own risk assessment in relation to covid-19 and take preclusions as and when I see fit at the age of 78 :cool: I afford to waste my remaining years locking myself away or being scared of what might happen live every day as its my last because one day it will.:):)
wonderful approach to life. i am impressed with your carefree positive outlook in life. Best wishes to you... and thanks for sharing imp personal information.
 

human4

Registered User
Jun 15, 2021
25
0
My mum told me about dads memory some time before she died, she said he would not cope on his own. After she died it became obvious that there was a problem, most likely MCI but within a couple of years it was obvious that it was dementia. We muddled through until 2017 when we finally got dad diagnosed with early stage alzhiemers after a worrying incident and he scored 75/100 Dad muddled along for another couple of years with a lot of support from me (I had to stop working then) until 2019 when he had a bout of pneumonia and ended up in hospital for three weeks.

Up until then he was in a very slow decline but the hospital stay really caused a big decline mentally and physically and I had to move in with dad. He had another year at home before he died in 2020 If he had not had the pneumonia and also a cancer diagnosis in 2018 I believe his decline would have been a lot slower and he would probably still be muddling along with me right behind him.

It is different for everyone but I think routine is very important, my dad did the same things everyday like clockwork. It was only when his driving became severely bad that I had to step in. Upsets of any kind can cause problems, like my dad losing his very battered car, I think that set him into a bit of a decline. Holidays can eventually cause upset as can changing things in the house, it can be disorientating for somebody with dementia. Keep him healthy as hospitals are not good places for people with dementia. I took dad out regularly but always to the same places for lunch and if we went for a walk it would always be the same walk.

Keep posting on here because there will usually be someone with some good advice and it is just a good place to come.
Duggies girl, thanks for your advice. u mean to say that people with dementia must be taken to same place everytime? i had read that change of place, route, setting can be relaxing and creates new connections in brain which helps delay deterioration and calms them?? and any idea if alzhemeher patients can be taken on holiday abroad via air travel???
 

human4

Registered User
Jun 15, 2021
25
0
My mum told me about dads memory some time before she died, she said he would not cope on his own. After she died it became obvious that there was a problem, most likely MCI but within a couple of years it was obvious that it was dementia. We muddled through until 2017 when we finally got dad diagnosed with early stage alzhiemers after a worrying incident and he scored 75/100 Dad muddled along for another couple of years with a lot of support from me (I had to stop working then) until 2019 when he had a bout of pneumonia and ended up in hospital for three weeks.

Up until then he was in a very slow decline but the hospital stay really caused a big decline mentally and physically and I had to move in with dad. He had another year at home before he died in 2020 If he had not had the pneumonia and also a cancer diagnosis in 2018 I believe his decline would have been a lot slower and he would probably still be muddling along with me right behind him.

It is different for everyone but I think routine is very important, my dad did the same things everyday like clockwork. It was only when his driving became severely bad that I had to step in. Upsets of any kind can cause problems, like my dad losing his very battered car, I think that set him into a bit of a decline. Holidays can eventually cause upset as can changing things in the house, it can be disorientating for somebody with dementia. Keep him healthy as hospitals are not good places for people with dementia. I took dad out regularly but always to the same places for lunch and if we went for a walk it would always be the same walk.

Keep posting on here because there will usually be someone with some good advice and it is just a good place to come.
what age was your dad when he got diagnosed - if i may ask...
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
1,956
0
High Peak
Lots of people have dementia but only one of them is your dad. You know him better than anyone, what he's like from day to day, what he can and can't do. Everyone is different and with dementia, various factors can affect the progress of deterioration and behaviours. People can have more than one type of dementia, e.g. Alzheimers + vascular dementia and much depends on the person's other existing health conditions.

My mother lived with dementia for about 10 years and was managing OK for most of that time. (She was undiagnosed and hadn't seen a doctor in years.) I suppose it was MCI at first then early stage dementia. It was only in the last year that she began to really deteriorate. A fall resulted in hospital where she had a dramatic decline and she moved to a care home. She died 3 years later.

So sometimes things start very slowly, with other people the progress of the disease is fairly quick. With vascular dementia, progression is often in 'steps' - a period of stability followed by a steep downturn.

It's probably best to take things day by day and see what works for your father. Some people with dementia really struggle with change of any sort and tend to withdraw into their homes. Others really enjoy trips out and find it stimulating (but often exhausting!)

Good luck - it's a horrible disease but this forum offers lots of support and info.
 

Countryboy

Registered User
Mar 17, 2005
1,656
0
South West
and any idea if alzhemeher patients can be taken on holiday abroad via air travel???

Hi human4 I noted you just recently joined Talking Point for advise obviously you will need to decided what you do with that advise , personally I can only advise you on my own experiences of living with my dementia for 22 years I joined talking point / Alzheimer’s society in March 2005 so you can look me up if you do you will note I have always had a positive outlook in relation to my dementia

Re: your question on holidays I usually go on holiday abroad twice a year never had any issues with airlines there is no requirement to tell the airline you have dementia ;) , I always drive when I’m abroad unfortunately last year holidays were cancelled :mad: however I did book a holiday for September after I booked was told I may need to go on dialysis because I had a kidney removed because of cancer o_O but fortunately my surviving kidney is coping now so holiday for September is back on I also have a holiday booked for May 2022 :cool: so maybe I’m being optimistic but I rather think I’m being positive only thing with other medical issues no travel insurance will give me cover but once again that my decision to way up the risk let face it what’s the worst that could happen.:p at 78 years old life to short to worry about doom and gloom ;):)

human4 this is only my personal views I’m not suggesting anything or offering advise

ps I was 56 when first dignosed :):rolleyes:
 

Duggies-girl

Registered User
Sep 6, 2017
2,725
0
what age was your dad when he got diagnosed - if i may ask...
Dad was 87 when he was diagnosed and 89 when he died. It took a long time to get him diagnosed because he thought that there was nothing wrong with him but his doctor was aware of how he was and had my number.

It was a very slow decline overall, mum died in 2011 so dad was in early stages for probably 9 years. It was the hospital stay that caused the biggest decline but despite that dad did improve and could dress himself and take himself to the bathroom right up to the end.

As for travel and holidays it is possible and depends on how the person is affected. @Countryboy is quite remarkable and I wish everyone with dementia was able to continue to do things the way he has, he is an inspiration. Sadly most people do decline and often lose confidence although it can be a very slow decline. Dad had his last holiday in 2014 we went on a cruise which went very well but dad had been on the ship many times and knew where he was. Some people can get very anxious when they are out of their safe environment. At the beginning we went to lots of different places but dad would worry about where we was going and for how long and then he would want to go home early because he didn't really know where he was. He started to have difficulty choosing what to have for lunch, I would give him 2 or 3 choices but he would always end up having what I had so I would always have fish and chips because I knew that he would have chosen that if he could have made up his own mind.

I suppose that everyone is different but in my experience too much stimulation and too many choices can cause anxiety for some. Choosing between tea or coffee was really difficult for dad so I would just offer him coffee in the end because he preferred it.

You know your dad best and if you think he is still capable of these things then go for it while he can still enjoy it and I hope he does well.
 

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