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How do they stage Vascular Dementia ?

Lynne

Registered User
Jun 3, 2005
3,433
Suffolk,England
jenniferpa said:
... she becomes fixated on something .... this went on then suddenly, that was replaced by something else to worry about. Jennifer
My Mum too, although she doesn't have Vascular Dementia (so far as we know!).
She'll drive me to distraction by obsessing about one thing for weeks, then it will suddenly disappear off the radar completely, to be replaced in her mind by something else. I TRY (not always successfully) to tell myself it's real to her at the time. Not being a saint, I usually end up snapping at her sometime during the fixation stage.
 

jenniferpa

Registered User
Jun 27, 2006
39,448
Lynne - don't we all? Fortunately, that's where memory problems work to our advantage.

Jennifer
 

sunny

Registered User
Sep 1, 2006
598
Hallucinations - VD

mum, has had many hallucinations so must be a feature of VD, many bizarre ones. It is if she has had a dream, woken up and walked about with her eyes open but is still seeing the dream and thinking it is real and trying to tell me about it. Most odd. I guess its the brain not working properly. I noticed this more when she has been asleep and then woken up, it seems to take her a long time to come to properly even though her eyes are open. To her though it is if it is really happening and she can be quite frightened at times.

She has also seen in the room relatives that have long died, pets that have long died and children. She also has heard people talking in the room and tried to have a conversation with them while her and I having been sitting alone. Most peculiar? She was prescribed Promazine which did seem to help.
 

Dee

Registered User
Mar 23, 2005
41
Shropshire
Hi all

My mum doesnt have hallucinations but she does have the fixations that you describe - be it clothes not being hers (they are) or pieces of electrical equipment not being on/off/working. She will do this for a few days and then completely forget about it and move onto something else.

As you say must be a facet of this dreadful condition.

When she was still at home, it was keys and her handbag which were the things she obsessed about, but now she doesnt mention them as she has got used to living in the care home and so doesnt need either. I keep her handbag next to her chair and show it to her sometimes but shes not really interested.

She too has forgotten how to use things like the phone, remote control etc but they are still there as I think its important that she sees them and the phone is a link with her friends who we phone together.

Take care all

Dee
 

hellywelly

Registered User
Mar 10, 2007
2
London
Hi All,

I'm a new user and would just like to say that reading through this thread I've realised that my aunt's symptoms are more common than I realised. It has helped a lot to read all your comments, at last I feel that I and my family are not alone. My aunt's recent obsession/delusion is that she's not in her own home and she wished they (who ever 'they' may be!) would come and get her and take her home. Unfortunately neither myself, my brother or sister live near by, only my mum who is house bound through arthritis and emphysema lives in the same city. I don't know whether it is good or bad, but my aunt can still remember my mum's telephone number and calls her when she is confused and not sure what is happening. Mum tries her best to reassure her over the phone, but she worries that she can't get to her sister.

:eek: