How do I get my wife to use a wheelchair

Discussion in 'I have a partner with dementia' started by Kenbob, Apr 18, 2019.

  1. Kenbob

    Kenbob Registered User

    Jan 11, 2019
    11
    Male
    hi,
    What is the best way of getting my wife with moderate Alzheimer’s and impaired vision to use a wheelchair so we can get out more as she has become more frightened and unsteady when walking
     
  2. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,896
    Kent
    How does your wife position herself to sit in an ordinary chair @Kenbob? Can you replicate the position of the wheelchair so it seems the same?

    There is quite a difference in appearance between a wheelchair and a normal chair and if your wife has impaired vision we don`t really know what she is seeing.

    Could you contact Occupational Therapy? They will often send a therapist to your home to guide you and your wife to help to introduce a wheelchair.
     
  3. Sirena

    Sirena Registered User

    Feb 27, 2018
    1,327
    Female
    Have you already tried to get her to use a wheelchair and found she struggles to accept it? She may find the sensation of moving around while seated a bit odd and frightening, and not be able to understand what's happening. Alternatively she may enjoy it - my mother loved being pushed around in a wheelchair before she started to mobilise after she breaking her hip.
     
  4. Jessbow

    Jessbow Registered User

    Have you tried yet? if/when you do, Please speak to her before you do any manoever , Its quite un-nerving when you can see, must be worse if you cant. Imagine, suddently being tipped back with no warning to get up a kerb

    talk talk talk and talk more
     
  5. Kenbob

    Kenbob Registered User

    Jan 11, 2019
    11
    Male
    Thanks for all your comments and advice,I haven’t attempted to introduce her to a wheelchair as yet because I am nervous in case the experience puts her off altogether, and just wondered how others in the same situation managed.
     
  6. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    68,896
    Kent
    I suppose it depends on how much language your wife has @Kenbob. If she can understand the benefit it will be half the battle.
     
  7. Jessbow

    Jessbow Registered User

    Try a supermarket one first, before you commit to buying- short predictable ride for something specific.
     
  8. Kenbob

    Kenbob Registered User

    Jan 11, 2019
    11
    Male
    Thanks for all your advice so pleased this forum is here
     
  9. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,628
    Female
    South coast
    When mum started needing a wheelchair I said I would take it when she needed to go out so that she would have somewhere to sit down and rest. Then, once she was sat down I would push her for a while until she wanted to get up again.

    BTW, I borrowed a wheelchair from Red Cross to find out how she (and I) would get on and find one that fit in the boot of my car, but you can also get an OT assessment and they might give you a wheelchair.
     
  10. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,650
    Female
    Scotland
    As suggested using the free wheelchairs at a shopping centre might be a good start. We have them at Tesco and our shopping mall has a Shopmobility centre on site which will lend wheelchairs etc.
     
  11. AliceA

    AliceA Registered User

    May 27, 2016
    2,136
    I can understand the anxiety, I have always hated using one when in a hospital setting when essential.
    The feeling being out of control and helpless. They are not always the most comfortable ride, facing front at car level. So the super market idea sounds a splendid idea. Smooth surface, no traffic or curbs. Gentle weaning is the answer. I wonder if anyone has thought of designing one facing the pusher, easier to talk and share.
     
  12. Spamar

    Spamar Registered User

    Oct 5, 2013
    6,876
    Suffolk
    I’ve got arthritis and although im not chair bound I will use a wheel chair if it means I can get around somewhere I couldn’t see otherwise. For instance, our local bird reserve, couple of places on holiday, some NT places.

    No, it’s not nice, but it’s a means to an end.
     
  13. Ohso

    Ohso Registered User

    Jan 4, 2018
    139
    I recently had this with my mum, she has always hated the thought but after a long walk down hospital corridors where she really struggled ( no hand rails and no seating ) l bought a relatively cheap one from Amazon and kept it in the car, the very next time we went out l sugfested we take it in case she wanted a seat but as soon as she stood out of the car she was too shaky to walk so sat in it 'just for a minute' and now happily sits in it, which it lucky as she has had several hospital appointment that would have been a nightmare.
    One thing l would suggest if using supermarket/hospital ones is maybe buy a cushion, l bought a memory foam one specific for the wheelchair and it makes the ride more comfortable.
     
  14. Duggies-girl

    Duggies-girl Registered User

    Sep 6, 2017
    1,452
    Dad has one now for hospital visits. He would deny it of course as he can walk miles unaided but he happily accepts it when we use it.

    I bought it online for occasional use and it serves its purpose.
     
  15. Quenelise

    Quenelise Registered User

    Oct 7, 2017
    152
    My husband doesn't like using any aids; it reinforces his disability issues. Hates his glasses, his hearing aids, his walking frame, his safety buzzer, the book I've created that answers his common questions, and his watch.
    I imagine you will have to introduce it in stages, and associate its use with something nice. For example out at a Cafe or going out for a walk.
    Does she hate the idea of others seeing her? Perhaps start with a private area.
     

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