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How do I get a new needs assessment done?

Chrissie B

Registered User
Jan 15, 2019
97
North Yorkshire
Still no news from NYCC, and they are now ignoring all emails. I suppose they have run out of stupid questions in order to try and confuse me. Perhaps they are beginning to realise that they just make themselves look incompetent, I've made it clear that I keep all my emails from them. I wonder if the manager feels it might not look good that she asked crazy questions like why money was taken out of an account, when the date she was talking about, was when money went into the account. Must be tricky running a benefits office if you can't tell the difference. If she paid for any courses to do her job, I will personally vouch for her that she should get a refund.

I guess I should be grateful that social Services have every confidence that I will be able to cope even if my mother's money runs out altogether. Least I work full time, even if it is on minimum wages, and I haven't committed her to some expensive care-home they suggested she should go to when she was above the capital threshold.

Luckily, with my mother having had the gash on her leg caused by the ambulance men, the nurse goes round to my mother's every week to put fresh dressing on. She saw how hard it is to get my mother to stand up, and she is arranging for some kind of equipment which should help her to stand up with help.
First time for my mother to refuse to have her blood pressure taken. The nurse and doctors have known us for years, so they can see how very different my mother is now. It's good that there are people who actually understand the situation. Anyway, since Social Services won't help, the nurse has pushed forward for someone from physio to go and assess the problem of not being able to get mum to stand up, which should help my mother to get any necessary equipment to keep her mobile enough to prevent her getting into too much pain.
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,376
cornwall
Still no news from NYCC, and they are now ignoring all emails. I suppose they have run out of stupid questions in order to try and confuse me. Perhaps they are beginning to realise that they just make themselves look incompetent, I've made it clear that I keep all my emails from them. I wonder if the manager feels it might not look good that she asked crazy questions like why money was taken out of an account, when the date she was talking about, was when money went into the account. Must be tricky running a benefits office if you can't tell the difference. If she paid for any courses to do her job, I will personally vouch for her that she should get a refund.

I guess I should be grateful that social Services have every confidence that I will be able to cope even if my mother's money runs out altogether. Least I work full time, even if it is on minimum wages, and I haven't committed her to some expensive care-home they suggested she should go to when she was above the capital threshold.

Luckily, with my mother having had the gash on her leg caused by the ambulance men, the nurse goes round to my mother's every week to put fresh dressing on. She saw how hard it is to get my mother to stand up, and she is arranging for some kind of equipment which should help her to stand up with help.
First time for my mother to refuse to have her blood pressure taken. The nurse and doctors have known us for years, so they can see how very different my mother is now. It's good that there are people who actually understand the situation. Anyway, since Social Services won't help, the nurse has pushed forward for someone from physio to go and assess the problem of not being able to get mum to stand up, which should help my mother to get any necessary equipment to keep her mobile enough to prevent her getting into too much pain.
My dad has a Sara Steady which helps him up from the recliner.He just needs to grab hold the handle and pull himself up.It has a seat which he can sit on when up.It is on wheels.
 

annielou

Registered User
Sep 27, 2019
1,010
Yorkshire
Thats good news you might finally get something to help mum stand because of nurse. I hope you get something soon. X fingers crossed
But its rubbish news on not getting any reply from SS. What a rubbish system. I do hope somebody somewhere in SS perks up and gets back to you and gets your assessment for your mum done soon. X
 

Chrissie B

Registered User
Jan 15, 2019
97
North Yorkshire
Thanks Annielou,

In a way the Social Services have done me a favour. Getting a needs assessment via the nurse has been amazing. My mother now has a great new hospital bed which arrived yesterday,was advised to be put downstairs, she hasn't used it yet, but at least if she struggles to go upstairs it is there. The assessor put this down as an emergency
They also sent a Sara Steady TNJJ. Assessors came today to see her use it, but she couldn't manage to follow the basic instructions. The relief carer who is on this week, did manage to get her to use it later on after they had left, but it took a long time. The assessors are coming back tomorrow again, hopefully to see progress made if my will comply again. I was a little concerned that my mother would be wheeled everywhere because it's quicker and easier than getting her to walk, but relief carer has assured me she won't do that, so that's cool.
The doctor asked me to go for a visit, and we have started a care plan. The doctor is going to try and arrange it so that the carer can call out for an emergency call out next time she is concerned with my mother being unable to stand up. They will be informed that taking my mother to hospital should only be done as an emergency if she had a bad fall for instance, which is much better.

I have to work tomorrow, but I have asked the relief carer to talk to the assessors when they come back about who I can contact about getting someone to help with giving my mother a really good wash hopefully 2 times a day, or even if it's just a few evenings a week. It is now impossible to get her into the shower, and I haven't been able to get her to go into a bath for about 3 years now.
My mother is aggressive and screams a lot when anyone tries to even change her, so giving her a really good wash is very difficult, Although the carer can manage it over a couple of hours sometimes, it can cause a lot of stress for both my mother and the carer during that time. Hopefully 2 people can get it over quicker, if that's the way to go.

They haven't once asked about my mother's finances, they just got on and helped, so I am very happy.

I'm a little worried that when my mother is downstairs sleeping and the carer is in bed upstairs that the carer won't hear my mother if she wakes up, and wondered if a baby monitor would be the answer. I'm thinking along the lines of a video camera, but I don't want one that attaches to the carer's phone for obvious reasons, it would be better if it was just from upstairs to downstairs.
 

annielou

Registered User
Sep 27, 2019
1,010
Yorkshire
Thanks Annielou,

In a way the Social Services have done me a favour. Getting a needs assessment via the nurse has been amazing. My mother now has a great new hospital bed which arrived yesterday,was advised to be put downstairs, she hasn't used it yet, but at least if she struggles to go upstairs it is there. The assessor put this down as an emergency
They also sent a Sara Steady TNJJ. Assessors came today to see her use it, but she couldn't manage to follow the basic instructions. The relief carer who is on this week, did manage to get her to use it later on after they had left, but it took a long time. The assessors are coming back tomorrow again, hopefully to see progress made if my will comply again. I was a little concerned that my mother would be wheeled everywhere because it's quicker and easier than getting her to walk, but relief carer has assured me she won't do that, so that's cool.
The doctor asked me to go for a visit, and we have started a care plan. The doctor is going to try and arrange it so that the carer can call out for an emergency call out next time she is concerned with my mother being unable to stand up. They will be informed that taking my mother to hospital should only be done as an emergency if she had a bad fall for instance, which is much better.

I have to work tomorrow, but I have asked the relief carer to talk to the assessors when they come back about who I can contact about getting someone to help with giving my mother a really good wash hopefully 2 times a day, or even if it's just a few evenings a week. It is now impossible to get her into the shower, and I haven't been able to get her to go into a bath for about 3 years now.
My mother is aggressive and screams a lot when anyone tries to even change her, so giving her a really good wash is very difficult, Although the carer can manage it over a couple of hours sometimes, it can cause a lot of stress for both my mother and the carer during that time. Hopefully 2 people can get it over quicker, if that's the way to go.

They haven't once asked about my mother's finances, they just got on and helped, so I am very happy.

I'm a little worried that when my mother is downstairs sleeping and the carer is in bed upstairs that the carer won't hear my mother if she wakes up, and wondered if a baby monitor would be the answer. I'm thinking along the lines of a video camera, but I don't want one that attaches to the carer's phone for obvious reasons, it would be better if it was just from upstairs to downstairs.
The nurse seems to have got straight to it, thats really good news x thankfully someone came through eventually, just a shame SS couldn't do same
Sounds like carers will try not to just wheel mum around which is good too and hopefully you'll get help with her washing too.
I know you can get pressure sensors that can go on bed or floor for if someone gets up that could sound an alarm in carers room but that might not help if ur mum awake but in bed.
What about a video baby monitor. (My niece has one for her baby boy so can see him in cot as well as hear him) not sure if would be good for your mums situation but maybe that way if mum woke and made noise carer could look at monitor and see if was distressed or needed help from carer or just stirring and going back to sleep.
 
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TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,376
cornwall
Thanks Annielou,

In a way the Social Services have done me a favour. Getting a needs assessment via the nurse has been amazing. My mother now has a great new hospital bed which arrived yesterday,was advised to be put downstairs, she hasn't used it yet, but at least if she struggles to go upstairs it is there. The assessor put this down as an emergency
They also sent a Sara Steady TNJJ. Assessors came today to see her use it, but she couldn't manage to follow the basic instructions. The relief carer who is on this week, did manage to get her to use it later on after they had left, but it took a long time. The assessors are coming back tomorrow again, hopefully to see progress made if my will comply again. I was a little concerned that my mother would be wheeled everywhere because it's quicker and easier than getting her to walk, but relief carer has assured me she won't do that, so that's cool.
The doctor asked me to go for a visit, and we have started a care plan. The doctor is going to try and arrange it so that the carer can call out for an emergency call out next time she is concerned with my mother being unable to stand up. They will be informed that taking my mother to hospital should only be done as an emergency if she had a bad fall for instance, which is much better.

I have to work tomorrow, but I have asked the relief carer to talk to the assessors when they come back about who I can contact about getting someone to help with giving my mother a really good wash hopefully 2 times a day, or even if it's just a few evenings a week. It is now impossible to get her into the shower, and I haven't been able to get her to go into a bath for about 3 years now.
My mother is aggressive and screams a lot when anyone tries to even change her, so giving her a really good wash is very difficult, Although the carer can manage it over a couple of hours sometimes, it can cause a lot of stress for both my mother and the carer during that time. Hopefully 2 people can get it over quicker, if that's the way to go.

They haven't once asked about my mother's finances, they just got on and helped, so I am very happy.

I'm a little worried that when my mother is downstairs sleeping and the carer is in bed upstairs that the carer won't hear my mother if she wakes up, and wondered if a baby monitor would be the answer. I'm thinking along the lines of a video camera, but I don't want one that attaches to the carer's phone for obvious reasons, it would be better if it was just from upstairs to downstairs.
Sara Steady is amazing and that probably is the way to go. It is lovely that you finally have some help.
 

Chrissie B

Registered User
Jan 15, 2019
97
North Yorkshire
The nurse seems to have got straight to it, thats really good news x thankfully someone came through eventually, just a shame SS couldn't do same
Sounds like carers will try not to just wheel mum around which is good too and hopefully you'll get help with her washing too.
I know you can get pressure sensors that can go on bed or floor for if someone gets up that could sound an alarm in carers room but that might not help if ur mum awake but in bed.
What about a video baby monitor. (My niece has one for her baby boy so can see him in cot as well as hear him) not sure if would be good for your mums situation but maybe that way if mum woke and made noise carer could look at monitor and see if was distressed or needed help from carer or just stirring and going back to sleep.
The video baby alarm sounds perfect actually. Could you ask your niece if she can recommend the one she uses and send a link if so, to where I can buy one?
 

Chrissie B

Registered User
Jan 15, 2019
97
North Yorkshire
Sara Steady is amazing and that probably is the way to go. It is lovely that you finally have some help.
Still a big struggle with the Steady. Rjef carer couldn't get my mother out of the armchair using it and had to call the ambulance out to help.
I wonder if she needs further training in using it or if a second carer forher it will 2 times a day needs sorting out sooner than I imagined. Apparently this should be done via the Social Services....oops
 

annielou

Registered User
Sep 27, 2019
1,010
Yorkshire
She said its a Motorola one and she got it from Argos but thinks you can get them more places. She says it is good and thinks its cheaper now than when she bought it a couple of year ago.
 

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TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,376
cornwall
Still a big struggle with the Steady. Rjef carer couldn't get my mother out of the armchair using it and had to call the ambulance out to help.
I wonder if she needs further training in using it or if a second carer forher it will 2 times a day needs sorting out sooner than I imagined. Apparently this should be done via the Social Services....oops
Do you not have a recliner?? Dad has an electric recliner which tilts up and helps.
 

Chrissie B

Registered User
Jan 15, 2019
97
North Yorkshire
She said its a Motorola one and she got it from Argos but thinks you can get them more places. She says it is good and thinks its cheaper now than when she bought it a couple of year ago.
Nice one on the Motorola. I ordered it today. Ironically when I went up today to see my mother, she was sat in a chair near to the bed, still upstairs, but that's probably best until her regular comes back, to work out when a good move to downstairs day is. I didn't think her bedroom was very warm, and her legs felt really cold because she wouldn't have any trousers or stockings on. The relief carer didn't realise how cold it was for my mother, so the added thermometer which is part of the baby alarm is a perfect addition. I think it is important for the room to be warmer for her than the recommended temperature because she is sat still all the time, sometimes wet without people realising straight away, and her skin just gets cold so very easily because of circulation problems. Any recommendations for ideal temperatures anyone?
I know in theory, if she is in bed the room can be a little cooler, but I wonder if it would be better to use a thinner duvet if she were to get too warm, so that she feels comfortable when she can be persuaded to go out of bed for a little walk around.
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,376
cornwall
I do think the steady would work if we can persuade my mother to pull herself up, her arms are strong enough, but I just don't know how to get her to pull herself up instead of trying to push the Steady away, (no pun intended)
To get somebody to stand like your mum, it sounds like you need 2.
 

Chrissie B

Registered User
Jan 15, 2019
97
North Yorkshire
I think you are correct TNJJ. Swap over carers day on Tuesday. I will ask them to see if they can get my mother to use the Steady whilst they are both there, they can brainstorm ideas that way too.
The two assessors that came to show the relief carer how to use the Steady, couldn't get my mother to use it all, but their suggestion was to persevere.
The relief carer told me she felt that moving my mother on and off the new hospital bed works pretty well, but she can't get my mother to use it from a sitting position on her armchair.
I truly don't believe my mother is being deliberately difficult over this, I just think she doesn't understand what she has to do because the brain gets tangled up, and her hearing is very very bad now that she can't wear a hearing aid anymore, so that doesn't help either.
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,376
cornwall
I think you are correct TNJJ. Swap over carers day on Tuesday. I will ask them to see if they can get my mother to use the Steady whilst they are both there, they can brainstorm ideas that way too.
The two assessors that came to show the relief carer how to use the Steady, couldn't get my mother to use it all, but their suggestion was to persevere.
The relief carer told me she felt that moving my mother on and off the new hospital bed works pretty well, but she can't get my mother to use it from a sitting position on her armchair.
I truly don't believe my mother is being deliberately difficult over this, I just think she doesn't understand what she has to do because the brain gets tangled up, and her hearing is very very bad now that she can't wear a hearing aid anymore, so that doesn't help either.
Yes that’s true.The brain does get tangled up. It most likely will be perseverance and repetition that will help. It will be come automatic (hopefully) to your mum eventually.
 

Chrissie B

Registered User
Jan 15, 2019
97
North Yorkshire
Had the needs assessment done since they finally accepted that my mother is below the Capital Threshold. To be the fair the Social Services lady was very nice. She assured me that the best thing for my mum would be to move her into a full-time care home. My mother's carer suggested that my mother would really love to at least have Christmas at the Carehome, because she could sit round with all the others having Christmas dinner, now we have the Sara Steady, the hospital bed wheelchair and zimmer frame downstairs, space is becoming very limited. My mother is still unable to stand half the time, and the carer is finding increasingly hard to wash my mother, and wishes to have a hoist plus someone to help with cleaning her. Social Services lady told me that if my mother needs to have 2 visits a day, it's not something they provide, and it was up to me to find someone.
I felt I was on my own in this and I agreed that my mother should have 2 weeks in the local carehome, which seems very nice, has a smaller department for dementia unit, and activities which coincides with Sundowner problems.
Social Services suddenly move with the speed of lightning. The assessment was done on the Tuesday, mum moved into the care home on Thursday.
The carehome manager sounded very positive that my mother's challenging behaviour would not cause any undue stress, they know exactly what they are doing. The carer gets my mother ready and I call a taxi that can take a wheelchair to take my mother down. I had to work on the Thursday, as this is not enough notice to swap days off, but I figured my mother would be better going with the carer than with me, since she knows her better by now.
The carer and I went to visit my mother after I finished work at 6:30pm.
I walk into the living area expecting to see my mother with all the others, but it is then explained that my mother was in her room already. We walked into my mother's bedroom, she is sat in an armchair in front of the TV. She isn't watching the TV, her hearing isn't good enough to hear it is on, and there's not even a subtitle she can try and read sometimes. I was told on the way there by one of the carers that they had to use their own pads for her, the carer didn't realise that my mother was to bring her own. It was also explained to me on the way, that my mother would not co-operate when she had to be weighed, and they had to use a hoist. They had found a small tear in her bottom when cleaning her up.
 

Chrissie B

Registered User
Jan 15, 2019
97
North Yorkshire
The carer was a little upset, she is always so very careful with how well she cleans my mother. She was assured that is looked quite new, and it was impossible to tell how this might have happened. I asked if it was possible that the hoist used to weigh her might have caused it. I think they felt that this was a personal attack rather than a simple question because things from there went from bad to worse.
I did ask why mother was already put into her bedroom, I was told that the noise from the main room scared her so much it was for her own good. I found this strange since for one thing, my mother's hearing in incredibly bad, and for another thing, she is quite used a room full of other people from going to daycare 3 days a week. It was then explained to me that my mother was very aggressive, and that she had attacked everyone who tried to wash her down. Things are now becoming a little clearer, so far my mother has been prodded poked had her underwear taken off, I now see why she was afraid anytime someone approached her.
So here we go again, I know my mother can be aggressive when she is scared, but usually if things are being done slowly, like you would with a feral dog, she will eventually calm down enough to take step 2, To be fair it can take a long time. The carer knows already, if my mother starts to make aggressive moves, she stays out of the way for long enough for my mother to calm down. Unfortunately, the poor staff there, don't have enough time for that. Looking at the other patients there, they are more on the early middle stages of dementia where as my mother is in her later stages, and is unable to stand on her own anymore as well.
 

Chrissie B

Registered User
Jan 15, 2019
97
North Yorkshire
The carer went back to my mother's house, picked up her pullup pants, and bought them down. There wasn't a commode in the room, so I thought since there is an attached toilet, perhaps they take them onto that. However, they can't do that with my mother because she afraid of all of them, and having been sat down on the armchair for too long, which is quite low down, we are back to the same problem as at home, we can't make her stand up. It's pointless trying to take my mother to the toilet even because standing up is too difficult.
We bought some fruit for my mother, and after we were with her for half an hour and she started to recognise us, we fed her grapes and apples. She was clearly very hungry, so the carer went back to the house to at least get my mother some savoury crisps. Whilst she was out, I carried on feeding my mother with apples and grapes. I am joking with her and said to her "Bless, did they starve you here, have you been sent here after lunch because you were being naughty."
Completely above my mother's head, she is munching apples, and having a drink in between of juice, which I also had to hold for her to accept. This is becoming more common lately. She won't help herself. Next thing I know, a young man, I guess must be the cook came in looking very angry. "Your mother was given dinner, but she would only eat a little of her potato, and wouldn't eat any of the chicken."
It makes sense to me afterwards that the room has a hidden microphone in, but it completely took me aback to find out like this.