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Hoping to create a game/app which helps people with dementia

Gergana Draganova

New member
Oct 1, 2020
4
Hello, I am a UK student who is hoping to create a game or app which will help people with dementia with their everyday life and tasks. My grandma has dementia, seeing her struggle with simple tasks inspired me to try and create something useful for people with similar condition.
I was hoping to get more information about the everyday challenges that someone with dementia is facing, as well as any ideas which you may have and would love to be implemented into the final product! 😄
 

Baker17

Registered User
Mar 9, 2016
759
Hello, I am a UK student who is hoping to create a game or app which will help people with dementia with their everyday life and tasks. My grandma has dementia, seeing her struggle with simple tasks inspired me to try and create something useful for people with similar condition.
I was hoping to get more information about the everyday challenges that someone with dementia is facing, as well as any ideas which you may have and would love to be implemented into the final product! 😄
I admire you for trying to create something, but very early on in my husband’s illness he lost the capacity to even work the things he had used all of his life. Sadly this is an experience I have found with other Carers. It would be good if such things could help but even the simplest of gadgets become a mystery to sufferers.
 

Gergana Draganova

New member
Oct 1, 2020
4
I admire you for trying to create something, but very early on in my husband’s illness he lost the capacity to even work the things he had used all of his life. Sadly this is an experience I have found with other Carers. It would be good if such things could help but even the simplest of gadgets become a mystery to sufferers.
That is unfortunate to hear, I will try and come up with something very simple and easy to understand. Thanks a lot for the reply, I really appreciate it!
 

Rosettastone57

Registered User
Oct 27, 2016
1,374
My mother in law lost the capacity very quickly to use normal everyday things such as the phone. The problem is that persons with dementia aren't able to learn anything new either . My husband gave his mother a simple radio with one on off button and unless someone was present to prompt her all the time to show her how to use it, the radio never got used. She was incapable of following any instructions
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
13,672
South coast
A friend of mine had a mum with dementia and he found a very simple program on his adroid that showed a cartoon picture and when you touched various parts something happened eg - you touched a flower bud and it opened, or you touched a flower pot and it fell over revealing a small creature. Some of the things that happened were quite amusing. It reminded me of the books intended for small children that you lift a flap to reveal something underneath. She had quite advanced dementia and was unable to remember that this existed, but if he gave it to her it kept her occupied for quite a while.
 

Gergana Draganova

New member
Oct 1, 2020
4
A friend of mine had a mum with dementia and he found a very simple program on his adroid that showed a cartoon picture and when you touched various parts something happened eg - you touched a flower bud and it opened, or you touched a flower pot and it fell over revealing a small creature. Some of the things that happened were quite amusing. It reminded me of the books intended for small children that you lift a flap to reveal something underneath. She had quite advanced dementia and was unable to remember that this existed, but if he gave it to her it kept her occupied for quite a while.
That sounds promising! I have read a lot and have done a lot of research on this topic. There has been several experiments which prove that engaging daily in intellectual activities such as playing games, reading etc. slowly but gradually contribute to improving the cognitive skills. That is what I am aiming for and even though it may not have instant effect I believe that when it becomes part of someone's routine and it keeps repeating there is a great chance for improvement as time passes! Thanks for the reply :)
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
13,672
South coast
There has been several experiments which prove that engaging daily in intellectual activities such as playing games, reading etc. slowly but gradually contribute to improving the cognitive skills. That is what I am aiming for and even though it may not have instant effect I believe that when it becomes part of someone's routine and it keeps repeating there is a great chance for improvement as time passes!
Id just like to mention that when you are talking about dementia, there is no possibility of improvement. Their brain cells are dying and cannot be replaced. Decline is inevitable and what you have to do is help the person with dementia to make the most of what they have got left. You have to look at improving their quality of life and finding things that they can still do can be a challenge.
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
947
High Peak
No, sadly nothing will bring about improvement, as @canary says.

My kids used to love the interactive Talking Books on the PC when they were young - you could click on bits of each picture (page of a story) to get little sounds or animations. I've also seen simlar things for children with special needs, e.g. large pictures or patterns that move or change when touched.

I'm sure such things could be created/adapted for use on a tablet but it would - in my opinion - have very limited use. (For example, if I'd shown such a thing to my mum she would have loved it for 2 minutes but once I'd gone it would be discarded and forgotten.)

Keeping people with dementia occupied/distracted/entertained for a bit is possibly the most we can hope for. Unfortunately - in my experience - technology does not have the answers.