Home Visits by Doctor

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by jks, Oct 3, 2005.

  1. jks

    jks Registered User

    Jul 2, 2005
    67
    West Yorkshire
    Hi There
    Can anyone tell me, please, whether my elderly parents have the right to ask for a home visit from their GP ?

    Dad (75) has AD, Mum (80) is in a wheelchair following a stroke earlier this year, and just a trip to the surgery is such a performance and leaves them both stressed and upset. They only want a flu-jab.

    The receptionist at their surgery is most unhelpful and usually reduces Mum to tears with her barrage of questions. I'd like to know where I stand before I ring!

    Thank you
    Joanne
     
  2. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    I don't know for sure... it probably depends on the surgery.

    When Jan was at home and I was caring for her, I would e-mail our GP directly and he would come out.

    He would also call in unannounced if he was passing, just to check things were ok.

    Yes, he IS a good GP!

    PS at this time Jan was 59.
     
  3. Sandy

    Sandy Registered User

    Mar 23, 2005
    6,847
    Hi Joanne,

    According to this NHS document:

    http://www.nhsplus.nhs.uk/hot_topics/hot_topic_nov03.asp

    Most flu jabs are administered by nurses at GP surgeries. However, district nurses and health visitors can also arrange for patients to have the jab at home.

    So it sounds as if it should be possible for your parents to be seen at home.

    The NHS Direct web site says:

    If you think you need a flu vaccination, check with your local pharmacist, GP or the practice nurse, or if a nurse visits you regularly, you can ask them.

    This also seems to imply that district nurses can look after this.

    Take care,

    Sandy
     
  4. Finnian

    Finnian Registered User

    Sep 26, 2005
    60
    U.K.
    We have an excellent GP who comes out regularly, invited or not, just like Brucie and Jan. He (and his partners) are worth their weight in gold. Some of the issues about home visits hinge on whether or not there are enough staff in the practice. If the GP is working alone he obviously can't be everywhere and might limit home calls to be able to cope with the need at the surgery. The bottom line might be to change surgeries. However that is a drastic move.
    It would be worth asking if there is a District Nurse attached to the surgery as a flu jab would probably be their role. If you manage to capture such a person, ask about the local system. I can't believe your parents would be the only patients who have trouble physically getting into the surgery so they must have some way of responding to this need. Hopefully the nurse will be more approachable than this ogre on reception and if necessary could feed back direct to the GP how mum feels about the receptionist. In bigger surgeries nurses will often do housecalls to people who need contact for long term problems, A GP will usually then take crisis problems.
    Its also worth finding out if there is a Practice Manager. The bigger the surgery the more likely there will be someone in this role. They are responsible for the "housekeeping" issues and staffing problems. They could tell you about home visits and/ or have a word with the receptionist about her manner.
    Hope this helps a bit.
     
  5. jks

    jks Registered User

    Jul 2, 2005
    67
    West Yorkshire
    Hello Guys, thanks for your replies.

    I rang my parents surgery, and told the receptionist that they would be requiring a home visit. Not that 'they would like.'...or... 'they wondered if they could have.... ' quite simply, that they required a home visit for their flu jabs.

    No problem, she said, she'll arrange it for the end of the month!

    I'm still in shock.

    Regards
    Joanne
     
  6. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    Classic case of "if you don't ask, you don't get".

    We tend to hold these people too much in awe. They deserve respect because they are in a caring profession and most of them actually do care. Too often they would be very happy to help if we would only ask. With so many patients they can't be expected to volunteer these things to everyone.

    But we should never forget that they are working for US, providing a service which WE have paid for!

    Well done and good luck!
     
  7. Glad you got it sorted Joanne... it's a pity that unless you 'put your foot down with a firm hand' (so to speak) nothing seems to get done in this world.

    Here's to more people like you being assertive and getting the job sorted!

    Best wishes.

    :)

    N.
     
  8. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    JKS
    often it isn't the Dr its the receptionist who says no,and some seem to enjoy the power and status that they think they have.
    What a shame it is the ones who shout the loudest who get results.
    I worry about the poor souls who cannot stand up for themselves.
    Norman
     

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