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Hoist panic

Suzy C

Registered User
Sep 16, 2019
46
Has anyone else faced this problem? My 91 year old mother has vascular dementia and is now unable to walk or move from her bed. She won't co-operate even to roll on to her side sometimes and protests angrily at being moved in any way. She just wants to be left alone. We have had a hoist delivered but she screams with panic every time we try to move her with it and panics so much she hyperventilates. We, her daughters, persevere slowly but it is extremely distressing for all of us, the carers are now too scared to try and use it because they don't want to upset her particularly if she is shouting no, no, no. Any advice? Any one been here?
 

lemonbalm

Registered User
May 21, 2018
664
Hello @Suzy C . Do you think your mother is in pain when she is being moved? Regular paracetamol or a pain patch may be beneficial if her doctor feels that would be appropriate to try and she's not already prescribed them.

Being lifted in a hoist must be very alarming. I wonder if there is anything that would soothe your mum - a favourite piece of music, for example, or a treat of some sort, like a chocolate if she is able to eat those, just to distract her a bit. You could even try singing softly to her. I think anything is worth a try.

Just to add, one of the residents at my mum's care home is lifted using a hoist and she always becomes agitated, even though the carers are very gentle and she has been lifted this way for years. As I say, it must be very alarming. I hope the suggestions I've made can help.
 
Last edited:

nita

Registered User
Dec 30, 2011
1,930
Essex
My mother was like this at first when being hoisted but did get used to it, though she never liked it. It may be difficult for her to roll on her side - the ability to move independently seems to be lost as dementia advances. Can the carers use a slide sheet to roll her? They have to do it gently so as not to alarm her.

Another thought - initially would it be an idea to take something like diazepam (Valium) say half an hour before she is moved? The doctor would have to prescribe this and it may only be necessary at the beginning. My Mum was given this when she had to have a scan.
 

Suzy C

Registered User
Sep 16, 2019
46
Hello @Suzy C . Do you think your mother is in pain when she is being moved? Regular paracetamol or a pain patch may be beneficial if her doctor feels that would be appropriate to try and she's not already prescribed them.

Being lifted in a hoist must be very alarming. I wonder if there is anything that would soothe your mum - a favourite piece of music, for example, or a treat of some sort, like a chocolate if she is able to eat those, just to distract her a bit. You could even try singing softly to her. I think anything is worth a try.

Just to add, one of the residents at my mum's care home is lifted using a hoist and she always becomes agitated, even though the carers are very gentle and she has been lifted this way for years. As I say, it must be very alarming. I hope the suggestions I've made can help.
 

Suzy C

Registered User
Sep 16, 2019
46
Thank you for your response. I don't think she is in pain just scared of being dropped and not understanding what is happening. I do play music and sing which helps a bit.
 

Suzy C

Registered User
Sep 16, 2019
46
My mother was like this at first when being hoisted but did get used to it, though she never liked it. It may be difficult for her to roll on her side - the ability to move independently seems to be lost as dementia advances. Can the carers use a slide sheet to roll her? They have to do it gently so as not to alarm her.

Another thought - initially would it be an idea to take something like diazepam (Valium) say half an hour before she is moved? The doctor would have to prescribe this and it may only be necessary at the beginning. My Mum was given this when she had to have a scan.
Thank you for your response. I am glad to hear she got used to it. I have to say one week in and she is still screaming but i think maybe not quite so much as before.
 

Jale

Registered User
Jul 9, 2018
496
No advice/help but just wanted to say that Mum has to be hoisted (she is in a nursing home) and has been for 2 years as she cannot walk/stand. From watching her face and listening to her (what she comes out with makes my hair curl :eek:) and it is like every time she is hoisted is the first time because she cannot remember that she has been hoisted before, therefore she is frightened and scared. The carers just get on with it talking to her and trying to distract her, sometimes it works, sometimes not, once she is in the wheelchair she is "back to normal"
Good Luck
 

Spamar

Registered User
Oct 5, 2013
7,490
Suffolk
OK, I don’t have dementia, but I have experienced all ways of being moved, hoist, slide sheet and one of those things that inflate and lift you up and to me , surprisingly the hoist was the best and easiest to tolerate. (I did a lot of falling around last year!)
i can understand why someone with dementia wouldn’t like it though but I felt safe on a hoist and not so safe on the others.