1. sheelz

    sheelz Registered User

    Sep 1, 2014
    35
    My mum (83)has been told she needs a hip replacement, we had an appointment in December last year for an assessment with the trauma & orthopedic nurse because mum has vascular dementia, the out come was, keep taking painkillers as she thought my mum wasn't up to having the operation and to be reassessed. Her next appointment was last Tuesday, the trauma nurse wasn't there and so we saw the consultant who straight away said she needs the op (which we know she does as she is in a lot of pain and forgets to take tablets) we(my sister & me) tried to explain to the consultant about mums dementia, still lives on her own, can't take or remember advice given etc etc he dismissed all we tried to say and it ended with another appointment in 3 months for another assessment. I'm hoping someone can give some/any advice on what to do next, we know mum is in pain with her hip(we've seen the X-rays)but when the consultant examind her he asked her if her foot hurt (it didn't)but now she says it does !!! Mum has always liked attention, even before the dementia, so she knows she will get more attention if she says something is more painful than it is. Sorry this is so long.
     
  2. marionq

    marionq Registered User

    Apr 24, 2013
    5,901
    Female
    Scotland
    When we saw the consultant about getting a knee replacement husband said the pain was 4 out of 10, he hoped to be able to run after the op, he would have no trouble dealing with the after care exercises. They were very kind and talked for some time to him but the upshot was no op because his Alz would probably worsen after the anaesthetic and he would not be able to deal with the exercises. They were right. I tried to get him to do these from a book they gave us last August. He believes he does them but has not yet managed even once.
     
  3. Grey Lad

    Grey Lad Registered User

    Sep 12, 2014
    5,736
    North East Lincs
    I hope this helps. I have had both hips done and they are almost right now three years on. As you know this is serious surgery and G L woke up crying for his wife after first operation. From my experience if you are not able to follow a strict exercise regime after the operation you may be almost worse off. The pain will have gone but your mobility may be worse than before.

    Just one simple question will your loved one be able to lie on their back for 6 weeks after the operation? If not they risk dislocating the implant then they will be in real trouble. I'm glad I had mine done but even without dementia I neglected to follow instructions and have paid the price. I hope to be at the Leisure Centre this morning to continue to address muscle waste that is a consequence of not following advice following the operations.
     
  4. susy

    susy Registered User

    Jul 29, 2013
    801
    North East
    A hip replacement can be done with a spinal anaesthetic and possible sedation rather than a general anaesthetic. That would be what I would opt for if possible and I think you need to explore that. As for the hospital I'm guessing that your mum would be ok with the change of environment and would work with the physios while she was in?
    The biggest issue with a hip replacement is NOT putting yourself into certain positions that could cause the hip to dislocate. Things like bending down to put socks and shoes on. The next thing to think of is the exercises. Will she keep doing them when at home.
    If you go ahead with this it is an excellent operation with a fabulous outcome as the pain relief from getting rid of the arthritis is apparently wonderful. It's just a case of weighing up the risks and deciding which way to go.
    Good luck x
     
  5. Grey Lad

    Grey Lad Registered User

    Sep 12, 2014
    5,736
    North East Lincs
    #5 Grey Lad, Feb 7, 2015
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2015
    I forgot to mention the socks and shoes issue. Have to sit on the stairs to put mine on. But for me trying to sleep on my back for 6 weeks was the biggest issue as i lay awake for hours begging for sleep to come.
     
  6. henfenywfach

    henfenywfach Registered User

    May 23, 2013
    332
    rct
    Hi!
    My dad had appointment weds with an orthapedic consult..hes waiting for hip and knees.

    After months of injections and come back and scans..he says that due to the dementia he would have to weigh up whether the need for it was greater than the risk to affecting the dementia as anesthetics etc can affect it!.. at last a consultant that says what he thinks..tells it straight!
    If injections etc dont help then there be no other option than op.

    As expected the pain he gets doesnt always appear when expected and the oos and ahs sometimes dont match the rubbing or limping...i suggest pain killers etc and theyre refused. There is no doubt hes in pain..but we including him..eventhough he wont understand the bigger picture..will address it when the options on the table!
    Keep a diary maybe and if like my dad the pains dont match the facial expressions..or the need for meds..or not regularly when walking or sitting standing then clearly the conception of pain is affected or decreased or increased..and you knowing your loved one from the time you spend with them will have learnt when they are in pain..or have an idea...it could be communicated in all sorts of ways..its something we notice as family carers..not easy but seeing things through their eyes helps..
    Best wishes

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using Talking Point mobile app
     
  7. Spamar

    Spamar Registered User

    Oct 5, 2013
    6,988
    Suffolk
    I'm surprised you had to lie on your back, GL, I was told to lie on back or operated side. I did check I had heard right, I had, thank goodness. I had epidural for my op, BTW.
    I found the most important things for both hip and knee was to follow the instruction, and do the exercises. My hip is fine over nine years on, thank goodness. And mine gets tested these days, as I am a lot overweight! It did before, as I used to walk a lot of loose deep shingle. Not easy.
    Can't remember which it was where you have to lie with a pillow between your knees. I was very glad when time was up!
    Personally I would think several times before I let anyone with dementia, especially middle or late stages, have the op.
     
  8. sheelz

    sheelz Registered User

    Sep 1, 2014
    35
    thank you

    Thank you for all your reply's, I really appreciate them. I now have more information re operations, effects etc on people with Dementia(my mom in this instance) I am wondering if an injection would calm her pain down for a while as I'm defiantly thinking the op is out of the question. Thanks again all.
     
  9. susy

    susy Registered User

    Jul 29, 2013
    801
    North East
    She might, if she is lucky, get a few weeks out of the injections but they don't last longer than that is arthritis is causing the pain. Is she taking regular pain killers? As in actually taking them?
     
  10. J K N

    J K N Registered User

    Jan 21, 2015
    5
    chester
    My wife had a hip replacement 3 years ago (aged 78) just when she started to have mild memory loss. She did have the lumber injection and the opp. was not a problem. The pain killers were a huge problem morphine sent her seing "things this was then changed to pethadine this sent her completely insane, these were stopped very quickly with the only pain killers given were paracetamol which did not stop much pain. It was impossible for her to do any excersise so recovery has never been complete. So I would think very hard and long what would be best for your mother.
    I do believe that the attempted pain relief tablets did not do her any good at all because her memory and speach problems very suddenly became much worse.
    Now things have now moved on into a horrible place with her seeing people in the house, thinking I am another man, trying to get me to take her home,(but this is home). Trying to get out of the house at 10.00 pm. and 5.00 am with bags packed to go home. Then gets very violent when I try to stop her.
    I do have a worry that she has been on Risperidone for 10 days and I worry that something is making the illusions much worse. Certainly I am at a loss just what to do with her without bringing on more violence today.
    Sorry to go on but the bits about the hip needs very carefully consideration
    John
     
  11. sheelz

    sheelz Registered User

    Sep 1, 2014
    35
    Hi there, yes its arthritis and we've also seen the x-rays which were taken about 2 years ago(just after she was diagnosed with dementia) I must admit at the time we decided for her not have the operation as she is has never tolerated pain but now im thinking she should have had the hip replacement then :confused:. If only we could see into the future !? Yes she is on painkillers , but that's another issue, when asked if she taken them, she says she has, then we check the box and find out she hasn't or shes put the tablets somewhere else in the house..............isn't it frustrating !!??
     
  12. sheelz

    sheelz Registered User

    Sep 1, 2014
    35
    Hi John, So sorry about what has happened to your wife, thank you for sharing your situation. I agree fully, my moms operation needs careful consideration , she lives on her own and doesn't remember what she has been told, sometimes on an hourly basis, its a very difficult time for all of us. Take care.
     

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