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High rate attendance allowance

Vic10

Registered User
Feb 18, 2017
101
Can anyone tell me, is this just based on assistance required at night?
My OH currently gets the lower rate but other people I have spoken to are on the higher rate, just wondering given the challenges of looking after PWD at quite an advanced level?
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
6,574
Bristol
https://www.gov.uk/attendance-allowance/what-youll-get is not 100% clear on the difference between the two, but my partner got the higher rate after a seizure which meant she needed more help at night as well as during the day.
https://www.carersuk.org/help-and-advice/financial-support/help-with-benefits/attendance-allowance states

To satisfy the night-time test you need to show that you reasonably need either one of the following:

  • help with personal care at least twice a night, or once a night for at least 20 minutes
  • someone to check on you at least twice a night, or once a night for at least 20 minutes, to make sure that you are safe
I certainly have to be there overnight to help her back into bed and frequently find myself helping with clean nighties early in the morning. We had help filling in the forms from a local welfare advice agency who knew how to phrase it, though I believe AgeUK also provide advice and assistance. I hope that helps Vic.
 

Nandi

Registered User
Mar 20, 2018
28
Grimsby
Can anyone tell me, is this just based on assistance required at night?
My OH currently gets the lower rate but other people I have spoken to are on the higher rate, just wondering given the challenges of looking after PWD at quite an advanced level?
 

Nandi

Registered User
Mar 20, 2018
28
Grimsby
Yes I only got low rate because my husband went to bed at night and slept the fact that I didn't sleep properly listen in case didn't count. Was told until he was wandering at night in Street could not get higher rate. He is now in care home as I ended up in hospital as carers do hey now have to pay £600 per week I would have been cheaper
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,034
Scotland
Mine was completed by a charity worker who offered to do it and knew her stuff. I mentioned that John had gotten up a couple of nights and had a shower at 3 am etc. This was in his first year after diagnosis and she wrote copiously on the form but I think the night time details did the trick. We got the higher rate straight away.
 

Rosettastone57

Registered User
Oct 27, 2016
1,169
Can anyone tell me, is this just based on assistance required at night?
My OH currently gets the lower rate but other people I have spoken to are on the higher rate, just wondering given the challenges of looking after PWD at quite an advanced level?
My mother-in-law was on the lower rate initially, but once she started to hallucinate at night and kept pressing her carelink pendant , her need for supervision at night became relevant.
 

northumbrian_k

Registered User
Mar 2, 2017
969
Newcastle
The form for applying for higher rate allowance asks about medication, any professionals other than a GP who have seen the person within the last few months, a series of questions about care required at nighttime, and details of hospital stays or stays in a care home.

If applying it is important to focus on nighttime as the higher rate is only payable where needs at night have been identified. This ought to be the case if 24/7 care is required. Night is defined as after the house has been closed up (ie bedtime) so would include preparing for going to bed. If a person needs help to: get undressed/dressed for bed, get into bed or be propped up, recover bedclothes that have come off the bed, go to the toilet during the night, take medication at night; or needs supervision for safety or to prevent wandering or getting up at unearthly hours these would all count.
 

reedysue

Registered User
Nov 4, 2014
4,760
Scotland
Someone from the DWP came out and filled in the form for me, mum was awarded the higher rate based on the fact that she might wander not because she needed attendance at night.
 

Banabarama

Registered User
Dec 28, 2018
52
Sussex
On the subject of attendance allowance, I have been told that we cannot apply as my husband cannot sign the form ( he is too advanced in his dementia journey). Someone else may not sign for him. Would anyone have any experience which contradicts this as it does seem very unfair.
 

Olliebeak

Registered User
Sep 13, 2014
125
Buckinghamshire
On the subject of attendance allowance, I have been told that we cannot apply as my husband cannot sign the form ( he is too advanced in his dementia journey).

Someone else may not sign for him. Would anyone have any experience which contradicts this as it does seem very unfair.
There is a box on the form that asks if you are signing for someone else but you need to gave power of attorney or be an appointee. If you ring and apply for the form your application dates from that day. See this section from Citizens Advice....
https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/benefits/sick-or-disabled-people-and-carers/attendance-allowance/claiming-attendance-allowance/how-to-claim-attendance-allowance/
 

Vitesse

Registered User
Oct 26, 2016
169
On the subject of attendance allowance, I have been told that we cannot apply as my husband cannot sign the form ( he is too advanced in his dementia journey). Someone else may not sign for him. Would anyone have any experience which contradicts this as it does seem very unfair.
When my husband was first diagnosed we had a lady from the DWP come to see us and filled in the form for us (arranged by the Alzheimers Society). My husband is rather deaf and without hearing aids would not hear the phone or a smoke alarm. He already depended on me for a lot of the daily tasks. I don’t remember the exact words, but the DWP immediately offered me to be his representative and all correspondence comes addressed to me and I was able to sign the forms on his behalf. This had nothing to do with the POA, it was something separate organised by the DWP
 

Vic10

Registered User
Feb 18, 2017
101
Thanks everyone for your replies and advice.
It’s hard to know if applying for the higher rate is the right thing to do.
Because I’m here all the time it’s impossible to imagine how my OH would get by if he was alone. I don’t think he would even go to bed let alone undress, dress, etc, etc!
 

Izzy

Volunteer Moderator
Aug 31, 2003
61,105
68
Dundee
Thanks everyone for your replies and advice.
It’s hard to know if applying for the higher rate is the right thing to do.
Because I’m here all the time it’s impossible to imagine how my OH would get by if he was alone. I don’t think he would even go to bed let alone undress, dress, etc, etc!
I had the higher rate of attendance allowance for my husband. I had to ensure that he was properly ready for bed, didn’t fall out of bed overnight, find the toilet through the night )in the early days) etc etc. He would not have been able to any of these things if he had been on his own. I did the same for my mum as she lived with us and also had dementia.
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,034
Scotland
Mine was completed by a charity worker who offered to do it and knew her stuff. I mentioned that John had gotten up a couple of nights and had a shower at 3 am etc. This was in his first year after diagnosis and she wrote copiously on the form but I think the night time details did the trick. We got the higher rate straight away.
If
Thanks everyone for your replies and advice.
It’s hard to know if applying for the higher rate is the right thing to do.
Because I’m here all the time it’s impossible to imagine how my OH would get by if he was alone. I don’t think he would even go to bed let alone undress, dress, etc, etc!
I said to the lady who filled in our form that we were managing fine financially and didn’t need it. She very firmly told me that the journey had only just begun and I would find Alzheimer’s a costly illness.
 

TracyS

New member
Sep 30, 2019
9
My mum gets the higher rate, even though she doesn't need personal care yet. The reason for the higher rate is that she is restless and keeps getting up in the night and is a danger to herself, so it's worth you reapplying for the higher rate and mentioning night-time restlessness.
 

AbbyGee

Registered User
Nov 26, 2018
40
Portsmouth, South Coast
My OH received the higher rate of AA due to needing assistance both day and night. At night he will try and visit the bathroom without turning on any lights or try and visit 'the other bathroom' .... which we don't have. I normally accompany him, albeit at a discreet distance as he's not always aware of where he is or what he's doing and so needs gentle shepherding back to bed after the bathroom visit. There's also a couple of steps in the hall that are illuminated by a plug in night light but I can't be sure he's even awake during the nocturnal wanderings. I'm trying to decide whether a stair gate could be a good idea. A high one, naturally, so he won't keep walking and topple over it!
His sleep can be very restless (always has been - possibly PTSD) and he's had falls from bed which mean quite a resettling period as finding himself suddenly on the floor in a tangle of quilt leaves him in very distressed state.
Can't remember the last time I had a full night's sleep. Oh yes I can! It was 2008 when I was in hospital having hip replacements!
 

BIWO

Registered User
Sep 1, 2016
81
Bedfordshire
I am not entirely sure what triggers the higher payment. Best advice I got when filling the form is to put the worst case day you have to deal with. In my late Mum's case - in the early days she would get up in the night occasionally in the night as the disease progressed it became very regular. I got the higher rate first off +I think the Donzepil meds I suspect may have helped
 

marionq

Registered User
Apr 24, 2013
6,034
Scotland
My OH received the higher rate of AA due to needing assistance both day and night. At night he will try and visit the bathroom without turning on any lights or try and visit 'the other bathroom' .... which we don't have. I normally accompany him, albeit at a discreet distance as he's not always aware of where he is or what he's doing and so needs gentle shepherding back to bed after the bathroom visit. There's also a couple of steps in the hall that are illuminated by a plug in night light but I can't be sure he's even awake during the nocturnal wanderings. I'm trying to decide whether a stair gate could be a good idea. A high one, naturally, so he won't keep walking and topple over it!
His sleep can be very restless (always has been - possibly PTSD) and he's had falls from bed which mean quite a resettling period as finding himself suddenly on the floor in a tangle of quilt leaves him in very distressed state.
Can't remember the last time I had a full night's sleep. Oh yes I can! It was 2008 when I was in hospital having hip replacements!
Would you consider a frame at his side of the bed to stop him falling out? The OT gave my husband one after a fall and it really was very useful and very easy to fit. It just slid between the mattress and bed frame. I handed it back after John died or I would take a photo. Get your GP to make a referral for him to have the OT visit and see how they can help.
 

jenniferjean

Registered User
Apr 2, 2016
704
Basingstoke, Hampshire
Thanks everyone for your replies and advice.
It’s hard to know if applying for the higher rate is the right thing to do.
Because I’m here all the time it’s impossible to imagine how my OH would get by if he was alone. I don’t think he would even go to bed let alone undress, dress, etc, etc!
I suggest you get some help, maybe from AgeUK, to fill in the form. They will know exactly how to answer the questions to properly put across your position and what help your PWD needs from you. I've done that and am presently waiting to hear.
 

AbbyGee

Registered User
Nov 26, 2018
40
Portsmouth, South Coast
Would you consider a frame at his side of the bed to stop him falling out? The OT gave my husband one after a fall and it really was very useful and very easy to fit. It just slid between the mattress and bed frame. I handed it back after John died or I would take a photo. Get your GP to make a referral for him to have the OT visit and see how they can help.
I did discuss this with an OT but somehow came to the conclusion it wouldn't be of use at present. The falls aren't nightly and he can generally get in and out of bed without aid so it could be more of a hindrance. The OT did suggest laying pillows on the floor though! Yeah, right. A nice trip hazard, eh?
If I could find a rail that could be let down and put back simply by the PWD I'd probably try it. What we don't want is something that requires assistance to use - just something to act as a gentle roll-stopper.
Pillows under the bedclothes at the edge of the bed work to a degree but that's far from ideal. Never mind .... I don't need sleep. :(