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Hi I'm here because of my 92 year old mother

Discussion in 'Welcome and how to use Dementia Talking Point' started by Debs7, Feb 9, 2016.

  1. Debs7

    Debs7 Registered User

    Feb 9, 2016
    1
    My mother had 2 small strokes and then a big one 15 years ago. She is 92 and for the last 7 months has got progressively worse in her behaviour. She now chants "come on" all day, which is difficult for my dad as he, at the age of 95 looks after her, with carers 4 times a day. My mother is still at home but she now has new carers and has started lashing out at them and shouting. I noticed this when she was in hospital recently and a male nurse tried to get her out of bed and into a chair....she kept shouting at him as if she was in pain and he asked me if this was "normal". I told him that maybe he had hurt her and that she likes to do things herself and doesn't like to be rushed! When I am at home we do things very slowly and haven't had a problem, but I do understand that carers have a time limit, sadly. What I'm more concerned with is the constant chanting "come on" ? Does anyone have any ideas what this is about please? My mother loves listening to music and she sings along with most of the words even though she hasn't been able to utter a full sentence for 15 years, but she is still there on the inside as I have long chats with her. My father doesn't like noise, so apart from the television and songs of praise there is no music in the house and we have to respect the fact that it is still their house, (we have tried so many times to get him to turn the radio on). Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     

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