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Her father was killed because he invented a cure for Covid that made her immune

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
7,058
Bristol
I am not saying much or helping much these days. Poor old C is just on a loop where every conversation comes back to this delusion about her father. I try not to mention the virus as that sets her off, but a picture of Trump in the paper got her talking about Kennedy and from there the story about her father.
It is so draining, and so sad to listen to her mourning him over and over again. Her father was a forester with knowledge of the medicinal benefits of plants, and tragically killed himself after the war. In her mind he was a doctor too who could have cured the world of every disease, made her immune to Covid 19, if he had not been shot by the Americans. However much I distract her or try to reassure her, it makes no difference.
 

Bunpoots

Volunteer Host
Apr 1, 2016
4,774
Nottinghamshire
I remember how wearing it was when my dad got into a loop of untruths - which were very real to him...I wish I could offer something useful!
 

MaNaAk

Registered User
Jun 19, 2016
2,602
Essex
Dear @nae sporran,

Dad did this as well. Pre-Alzheimers dad would keep talking about the time when mum was diagnosed with Hodgkins in the 70s. Exactly twelve years ago (mum's anniversary is today) she passed away from heart failure. Of course radiotherapy weakened her heart and dad blames Hodgkins disease for this eventhough she had scarlet fever as a child. He would keep going over and over but eventually he forgot that she had passed away and thought she was still alive alongwith his parents.

The only thing you can do is distract your dear wife.

Hugs

MaNaAk
 

MartinWL

Registered User
Jun 12, 2020
245
I suspect it is not unusual but my father has increasingly mourned his late brother, who died some 15 years ago, and his parents, who died long before that. I suppose when you realise that your own life is close to the end ( due to very old age) nostalgia is to be expected but the extent to which he misses deceased family looks like it might be dementia at work. Not sure if that's the case.
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
7,058
Bristol
Thanks everyone. I think she is just missing her mum and the security she brought, then gets muddled about her dad. Distraction no longer seems to work for very long before something else brings her back to the people she misses.
 

Grannie G

Volunteer Moderator
Apr 3, 2006
71,827
Kent
It just depends on which item in the news which triggers the delusion.

With my husband, it was India`s space mission.


He was convinced his family was responsible for it and wanted us all to go to India to share the glory. He even discussed what we would all wear and told me I had to wear a hat.

He talked about it constantly and was very excited. Because it was a marked difference to his usual paranoia and anxiety we were happy to go along with it and did so until the mission failed.

For us it was a welcome distraction.

I`m sorry you are finding C`s delusions so difficult to live with @nae sporran because hers has such sad connotations.
 

Batsue

Registered User
Nov 4, 2014
4,891
Scotland
@nae sporran
These loops are so difficult to deal with mums seems to be triggered by seeing mountains on TV, she then believes that if she could climb the hill behind our house she would be able to get home and this can go on for days.
I really feel for you as when she starts on this subject my anxiety level goes off the scale.
 

TNJJ

Registered User
May 7, 2019
1,740
cornwall
Dad’s loop is “I should be getting better and walking “. Also “ I can walk without the frame “. I try to ignore mostly and do the “um” noise but sometimes I cannot help it. I said to him “ Shall we do it now ?”. Apparently he is going to do it next week..””Mmm “
 

nae sporran

Volunteer Host
Oct 29, 2014
7,058
Bristol
Thanks again everyone. It's the fact that I never know what will trigger it that is the hardest part, but we had this two or three years ago with her mum and not being sure if she was dead or alive. That passed in a month or so, where this seems to have been going on since April.
Good luck @TNJJ and @Batsue, sorry you are going through similar anxieties.
 

Starbright

Registered User
Apr 8, 2018
529
Dad’s loop is “I should be getting better and walking “. Also “ I can walk without the frame “. I try to ignore mostly and do the “um” noise but sometimes I cannot help it. I said to him “ Shall we do it now ?”. Apparently he is going to do it next week..””Mmm “
Oh @TNJJ ....your post made me smile everything in our house is “In a minute” .. and can get very agitated if I can’t wait for a minute or 30 minutes even an hour who knows :rolleyes: