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Help if possible please

Reds

Registered User
Sep 5, 2011
541
Hertfordshire
Hi!

Has anyone had any experience of just giving a prescribed medication to the one they care for before they go out so that they are calmer. My husband has Alzheimer's, much better at home but extremely hyper when out. The behaviour is like a very excited toddler, too much!

Reds
 

LadyA

Registered User
Oct 19, 2009
13,590
Ireland
No experience of giving medication for this - but my husband went through a phase of what you describe. Like a toddler on speed, he was for a while! Especially when we went shopping! Taking him to Aldi or Tesco was crazy. He would start a running commentary on everything, and be zinging around the shop as if he was on rollerskates! I'll never forget it. It was like "What's that? Is it good? Do you think I'd like it? Can we get some:? What's this? Are you getting some - hey what about this? Are we getting some of this - HEY LOOK!! That sign says HALF PRICE SALE! Let's get some!!" - (the sign was about half way across the shop - he couldn't even see what it was that was on sale!:rolleyes: I ended up with three jars of coffee one day (he didn't like coffee - but we had to try them!). For a while, I at least managed to keep him with me by giving him the basket to carry, so he could explore what went into it. The final straw was as we left the supermarket one day, two very large women were leaning over a shopping trolley sorting their shopping. William leaned toward me as we passed them, and said in a very loud stage whisper "I really don't like ladies with fat a***s!" :eek::eek: After that, I started getting the groceries delivered. Then we still went to the shops and library every day - but just for a stroll around, or a trip to a cafe for tea & cake, so he could "meet and greet" people. He enjoyed it, and it took the pressure off me, as I could concentrate on him and not be trying to get shopping and keep control of what he was doing.

Best wishes - it's a truly trying phase. It didn't last very long with William though.
 

Reds

Registered User
Sep 5, 2011
541
Hertfordshire
No experience of giving medication for this - but my husband went through a phase of what you describe. Like a toddler on speed, he was for a while! Especially when we went shopping! Taking him to Aldi or Tesco was crazy. He would start a running commentary on everything, and be zinging around the shop as if he was on rollerskates! I'll never forget it. It was like "What's that? Is it good? Do you think I'd like it? Can we get some:? What's this? Are you getting some - hey what about this? Are we getting some of this - HEY LOOK!! That sign says HALF PRICE SALE! Let's get some!!" - (the sign was about half way across the shop - he couldn't even see what it was that was on sale!:rolleyes: I ended up with three jars of coffee one day (he didn't like coffee - but we had to try them!). For a while, I at least managed to keep him with me by giving him the basket to carry, so he could explore what went into it. The final straw was as we left the supermarket one day, two very large women were leaning over a shopping trolley sorting their shopping. William leaned toward me as we passed them, and said in a very loud stage whisper "I really don't like ladies with fat a***s!" :eek::eek: After that, I started getting the groceries delivered. Then we still went to the shops and library every day - but just for a stroll around, or a trip to a cafe for tea & cake, so he could "meet and greet" people. He enjoyed it, and it took the pressure off me, as I could concentrate on him and not be trying to get shopping and keep control of what he was doing.

Best wishes - it's a truly trying phase. It didn't last very long with William though.

Thank you LadyA. Sorry you have had a difficult time. I can't take my husband to supermarkets or any shops anymore. The problem I have is waiting in reception rooms for appointments at a hospital or GP surgery. He run's around and does anything to get attention, its very disruptive.

Reds
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
9,132
Yorkshire
Hi Reds
is this something you are considering yourself, or something that has been recommended to you?
maybe have a word with his GP?
it may be a way for him to be in a more settled state for appointments and visits, which might be beneficial for him - but would also stop others seeing one of the concerns you have for him
 

LadyA

Registered User
Oct 19, 2009
13,590
Ireland
Thank you LadyA. Sorry you have had a difficult time. I can't take my husband to supermarkets or any shops anymore. The problem I have is waiting in reception rooms for appointments at a hospital or GP surgery. He run's around and does anything to get attention, its very disruptive.

Reds
Ah - Understand now. While waiting at the Psych of Old Age clinic with William, there used to be a couple there and the husband was a bit like your's. His wife used to check in with the receptionist, and then just go walking around the corridor with him until they were called. The receptionist (and the consultant) knew the situation and would just go looking for them when it was their turn - I think, from talking to the wife, that the consultant was working on trying to find the right medication in the lowest dose possible that would have an affect on calming her husband down without having too much of an affect. So maybe talk to the doctors about the problem - and don't hold back about how much of a problem it is!
 

Reds

Registered User
Sep 5, 2011
541
Hertfordshire
Ah - Understand now. While waiting at the Psych of Old Age clinic with William, there used to be a couple there and the husband was a bit like your's. His wife used to check in with the receptionist, and then just go walking around the corridor with him until they were called. The receptionist (and the consultant) knew the situation and would just go looking for them when it was their turn - I think, from talking to the wife, that the consultant was working on trying to find the right medication in the lowest dose possible that would have an affect on calming her husband down without having too much of an affect. So maybe talk to the doctors about the problem - and don't hold back about how much of a problem it is!

Thanks LadyA Yes just calmer would be nice, not expecting miracles and don't want him to change altogether. The behaviour is OTT. Its hard for me to leave him at home as soon as I go out he will be out the front to see what performing he can do. Very stressful and worrying.
Reds x
 

Reds

Registered User
Sep 5, 2011
541
Hertfordshire
Hi Reds
is this something you are considering yourself, or something that has been recommended to you?
maybe have a word with his GP?
it may be a way for him to be in a more settled state for appointments and visits, which might be beneficial for him - but would also stop others seeing one of the concerns you have for him
Thanks. We are seeing the specialist shortly. Its me that is hoping there is something that could keep him calmer.
 

Shedrech

Volunteer Moderator
Dec 15, 2012
9,132
Yorkshire
From what you describe, going out must be so stressful for you - I really hope the consultant can help.
I wasn't sure from your first post whether it had been suggested and you weren't happy about it.
In the circumstances, if there are some meds that will help settle him without doing any harm, well then both of you gain as you get to go out together without so much worry which is well worth achieving