Hello - Caring for dad with dementia type symptoms caused by brain tumour

Cladaw

New member
Jun 17, 2024
3
0
Cornwall
Hi, five months ago I moved to Cornwall to look after my dad. He has an inoperable brain tumour. The consultant suggested that dad would gradually lose the ability to swallow, however what’s actually happening are dementia type symptoms and the loss of use of his limbs. I’m finding the dementia part really difficult and looking forward to going through the threads and finding some help!
 

northumbrian_k

Volunteer Host
Mar 2, 2017
4,785
0
Newcastle
Hi @Cladaw and welcome to the Forum. I am sorry to hear about your Dad. I don't have any similar experience myself but others amongst our friendly and helpful members may have. We will in any case do our best to support you.
 

Kevinl

Registered User
Aug 24, 2013
7,379
0
Salford
One thing a dad and mum too always remember is that they love their children.
Never forget that, whatever you have to go through, you're talking to a condition be it dementia, brain tumor or whatever it's a medical condition not them you're talking to.
Suddenly one day in a "moment of clarity" you get a kiss or a cuddle, a thank you or whatever, makes it all worthwhile, I hope you do you deserve it. Thank you from me anyway. K
 

takingstock

Registered User
Jan 13, 2024
33
0
Lancashire
One thing a dad and mum too always remember is that they love their children.
Never forget that, whatever you have to go through, you're talking to a condition be it dementia, brain tumor or whatever it's a medical condition not them you're talking to.
Suddenly one day in a "moment of clarity" you get a kiss or a cuddle, a thank you or whatever, makes it all worthwhile, I hope you do you deserve it. Thank you from me anyway. K
That's so lovely and so true, I'm sure many of us will hold onto that thought, thanks Kevin
 

takingstock

Registered User
Jan 13, 2024
33
0
Lancashire
Hi, five months ago I moved to Cornwall to look after my dad. He has an inoperable brain tumour. The consultant suggested that dad would gradually lose the ability to swallow, however what’s actually happening are dementia type symptoms and the loss of use of his limbs. I’m finding the dementia part really difficult and looking forward to going through the threads and finding some help!
Thinking of you in these very difficult times, stay strong x
 

Gosling

Volunteer Host
Aug 2, 2022
2,165
0
South West UK
Hello @Cladaw and welcome from me also to this friendly and supportive forum. There is a wealth of shared experience of dementia to be found here, so I am glad you have found us.

I am sorry to read about your Dad and the dementia type symptoms he is displaying. Of course you are concerned.
Do please have a good look around the forums and ask any particular questions you may like to. People here really do want to help and, most importantly, understand.
 

jennifer1967

Registered User
Mar 15, 2020
25,511
0
Southampton
Hi, five months ago I moved to Cornwall to look after my dad. He has an inoperable brain tumour. The consultant suggested that dad would gradually lose the ability to swallow, however what’s actually happening are dementia type symptoms and the loss of use of his limbs. I’m finding the dementia part really difficult and looking forward to going through the threads and finding some help!
my mum had breast cancer which spread to her brain, lungs etc. when it went to her brain, she had dementia type symptoms. she forget shed eaten, would see people in the street and wanted to know why they didnt talk to her, couldnt remember watching programmes, balance was affected so she couldnt go in a bath even with aids. had to higher her seat as she couldnt get out of it. she had to go out in a wheelchair, would tip dishes up. sensitive to noise.
 

Cladaw

New member
Jun 17, 2024
3
0
Cornwall
One thing a dad and mum too always remember is that they love their children.
Never forget that, whatever you have to go through, you're talking to a condition be it dementia, brain tumor or whatever it's a medical condition not them you're talking to.
Suddenly one day in a "moment of clarity" you get a kiss or a cuddle, a thank you or whatever, makes it all worthwhile, I hope you do you deserve it. Thank you from me anyway. K
Thank you Kevin, yesterday was a bad day and I needed that reminder- it’s the condition.
 

Cladaw

New member
Jun 17, 2024
3
0
Cornwall
my mum had breast cancer which spread to her brain, lungs etc. when it went to her brain, she had dementia type symptoms. she forget shed eaten, would see people in the street and wanted to know why they didnt talk to her, couldnt remember watching programmes, balance was affected so she couldnt go in a bath even with aids. had to higher her seat as she couldnt get out of it. she had to go out in a wheelchair, would tip dishes up. sensitive to noise

my mum had breast cancer which spread to her brain, lungs etc. when it went to her brain, she had dementia type symptoms. she forget shed eaten, would see people in the street and wanted to know why they didnt talk to her, couldnt remember watching programmes, balance was affected so she couldnt go in a bath even with aids. had to higher her seat as she couldnt get out of it. she had to go out in a wheelchair, would tip dishes up. sensitive to noise.
This sounds so much like dad. Everything from not remembering programmes to balance and the bath. The gradual paralysis of body parts we are managing with aids - wheelchair, hoist etc. It’s him not believing that he can’t walk which I find hard. He’ll want to go out somewhere eg garden, so I get the wheelchair but he refuses it and spends the morning trying to stand up and walk. I guess it’s a big mind shift for me to learn that I have to let him do this and not get frustrated that he’s wasting the time that he could spend enjoying something more productive 🥺