Hello again good people...

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by fath, Nov 25, 2015.

  1. fath

    fath Registered User

    Apr 3, 2012
    14
    west mids
    #1 fath, Nov 25, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2015
    Hi ..
    Some of you will remember that I posted in April 2012, when my Father, died asking for advice on how to deal with his passing with my Mum..

    'Potted history'

    At that time Mum had not had a diagnosis but we were in the process...
    She had the memory test and failed with a total score of about 3 and so went for the scan and was then diagnosed with mixed Dementia (A.D. and Vasc.D.)
    I have been her 24/7 carer since then and later got some Sitting vouchers, 4 hours/week. I needed time out to do some shopping and an hour to myself and found Age-UK had a daycare which catered very well for Dementia and progressed to 3 hours incl. lunch thus giving me a short break as I could not go out during the 'sits' due to Health and Safety concerns :p related to another longterm, unconnected, health issue which has become potentially life-threatening over the last couple years.

    Mum has slowly deteriorated over the 3 years since Father died but can still move around the house with supervision and will go to the toilet if encouraged although she is largely incontinent now..
    she can feed herself and drinking is mostly no problem but I have to prepare everything..
    She can no longer entertain herself as she used to with 'Wordsearch' but will do colouring books and childs Jigsaws with help and also enjoys playing catch with soft juggling balls and also playing Skittles..
    Conversation is near impossible and she only knows that I love her, not who I am as a relative or any of the rest of the family... she is good natured and tries to please everyone and so needs company at all times in public places for safety...

    Altogether I feel I am very lucky

    -----------------

    OK to get to the point :)... I have learnt many things since my first time here and have also noticed that when her blood-pressure is higher over a period of time that she deteriorates noticably, or so it seems to me and Im not the only one to think this..

    since the beginning of October it has slowly but surely risen.. and I have seen her apparently suffer less mental ability as the time goes on... She has been on Candasarten for a considerable time and nothing changed except this recent increase in BP..
    I managed to get a call from the Doctor a week ago but she says that she wouldnt plan to do anything until the average BP was 150/90.. currently I think maybe 140/85 (up and down)

    My question is:
    'are there any Medical papers written, or reference pages at Dem.UK or here at Alz. Soc., which I could access, to possibly prove in my own mind or to even use as Reference for the Doctor, that there is evidence to support my casual, Carers, observation'
    I dont feel as a layman I get listened to... and I dont want an 'oversight' to cause unneccassary damage

    ty All for your time reading this 'Essay' :rolleyes:
     
  2. lin1

    lin1 Registered User

    Jan 14, 2010
    9,322
    Female
    East Kent
    #2 lin1, Nov 25, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2015
  3. fath

    fath Registered User

    Apr 3, 2012
    14
    west mids
    Thankyou very much... I will follow that through the site...
    I feel I am walking through treacle with Doctors sometimes... I know they are trying hard.. I just wish they would listen too :eek:
     
  4. lin1

    lin1 Registered User

    Jan 14, 2010
    9,322
    Female
    East Kent
    I used to find it was one step forwards and three back, though I must admit apart from two GP's at the practice ours were very good.
     
  5. sleepless

    sleepless Registered User

    Feb 19, 2010
    3,232
    Female
    The Sweet North
    Throughout the twelve years since my husband's diagnosis of Alzheimer's he has been seen by the 'memory nurse' every six months. Up until recently this included the MMSE test and he has always had his blood pressure checked at every visit. So the connection must be important.
     
  6. Mrsbusy

    Mrsbusy Registered User

    Aug 15, 2015
    356
    When we saw the mind clinic doctor, blood pressure is relevant. He explained it like this.

    With vascular dementia blood is trying to get through a hose pipe (veins in your brain). If the blood pressure is too high it's basically pushing the blood too fast through a smaller hole so therefore it has the effect of you putting your finger over a hosepipe, adding to the pressure and eventually the vein pops. We were told to take high strength fish oils to help clear the sludge in the veins therefore help lubricate them to make the blood flow easier.

    Also a lot of vascular dementia is caused by strokes, like my mums, which are caused by high blood pressure. There has to be a connection surely?

    Good luck.
     
  7. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,623
    Female
    South coast
  8. fath

    fath Registered User

    Apr 3, 2012
    14
    west mids
    #8 fath, Nov 26, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2015
    thank you all for your input...

    thank you canary
    all were of use but I found the last one in particular PMC3002634 ... understood 97% of it :eek:
    It did not refer to outcomes of high BP in moderate stage CVD (maybe another ref. 12597611)on the same site
    ... this is my problem... my argument would have to rely on my own observations (not accurate but 'merely anecdotal' :p)

    I dont suppose you have anything that might contain such...

    thankyou canary and all
     
  9. fath

    fath Registered User

    Apr 3, 2012
    14
    west mids
    #9 fath, Nov 26, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2015
    .
     
  10. fath

    fath Registered User

    Apr 3, 2012
    14
    west mids
    I am following this through but waiting for a callback now..

    ty lin1
     
  11. lin1

    lin1 Registered User

    Jan 14, 2010
    9,322
    Female
    East Kent
    I hope they can help you.
    Please let us know how you get on.
     
  12. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    9,623
    Female
    South coast
    Ah I see what you mean. All the research is about whether high blood pressure leads to dementia (which it does) and talks about the mechanism. There doesnt seem to be anything about whether continued high blood pressure progresses the dementia faster (well, not that I can find, anyway), although I would have thought that it was likely.
    Sorry
     
  13. hvml

    hvml Registered User

    Oct 10, 2015
    300
    North Cornwall
    Fascinating reading. Xx
     
  14. fath

    fath Registered User

    Apr 3, 2012
    14
    west mids
    I am still working on this...

    I have got the bug for research at the moment... I will try to find some relevant stuff and offer them either in Forum or to those that are interested...
    again I thank you all for your interest/help and concern...
     
  15. fath

    fath Registered User

    Apr 3, 2012
    14
    west mids
    #15 fath, Dec 3, 2015
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2015
    success...

    Hi all...
    to conclude this little 'saga' I went to the Doctor with mum and after checking her average BP over a fortnight (still below what had originally been stated as the point at which she would take action 150/90) and a few words gentle persuasion, which was helped by all my research and your own helpful additions, she agreed to up the drug for High BP without any problem :)...

    incidentally there is a useful paragraph on the Alz Soc website:
    __________________________

    http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=161&gclid=CNWqk53_sskCFSHmwgodXcIHxA

    "Control of cardiovascular disease

    If the underlying cardiovascular diseases that have caused vascular dementia can be controlled, it may be possible to slow down the progression of the dementia. For example, after someone has had a stroke or TIA, treatment of high blood pressure can reduce the risk of further stroke and dementia. For stroke-related dementia in particular, with treatment there may be long periods when the symptoms don't get significantly worse.

    In most cases, a person with vascular dementia will already be on medications to treat the underlying diseases. These include tablets to reduce blood pressure, prevent blood clots and lower cholesterol. If the person has a diagnosed heart condition or diabetes they will also be taking medicines for these. It is important that the person continues to take any medications and attends regular check-ups as recommended by a doctor.

    Someone with vascular dementia will also be advised to adopt a healthy lifestyle, particularly to take regular physical exercise and, if they are a smoker, to quit. They should try to eat a diet with plenty of fruit, vegetables and oily fish but not too much fat or salt. Maintaining a healthy weight and keeping to recommended levels of alcohol will also help. The GP should be able to offer advice in all these areas."
    ______________________________

    hope this is interesting... I found other stuff but not such easy reading :p
     
  16. lin1

    lin1 Registered User

    Jan 14, 2010
    9,322
    Female
    East Kent
    I am glad you persuaded the GP to up the meds to treat Mums high BP.
    Thanks for the link.
     

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