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Healthy eating and vascular dementia

CraigC

Registered User
Mar 21, 2003
6,632
London
Hi Sarah,

Thanks for the feedback.

Firstly, I certainly do think that a lot of people are more aware of their health and lifestyle. Many schools are making a great effort to make young people aware of their diet and the big difference between healthy and unhealth food. My daughter school is now a 'Water Only' school and has revamped school dinners to help promote healty living. At least kids will know when the are truely endulging themselves :)

The diet recommendations to prevent Vascular Dementia that you kindly posted. are very similar to the general recommendation for a heathy heart. What may also interest people who have a relative with dementia is specific supplements or dietary changes they cam make that may prevent Vascular Dementia (in fact any form of dementia). See, we feel at higher risk than most. We read that it is unlikely to be hereditary, but I for one feel that their just must be a higher risk statistically.

I know that there is no magic pill, but it would be good to stimulate discussions that allow people to make informed choices.

Hope that makes sense
Kind Regards
Craig
 

Sarah Day

Registered User
Sep 28, 2004
17
Gordon House, London
Would reduced insurance premiums persuade you to exercise?

Hi Craig

Talking about diet and it's impact in vascular dementia, what do people think about the medical insurer in the news today. They are proposing to link premiums to health improvements so for example, if people stop smoking, or visit the gym regularly, they will be rewarded with lower health insurance premiums. What impact do you think this sort of action will have on people's behaviour?

You can read more about the issue on the BBC website by using the following link:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/3706970.stm

Best wishes,

Sarah
 

Charlie

Registered User
Apr 1, 2003
161
Hi Sarah,

Unfortunately I am very sceptical about insurance companies, it sounds like a bit of a gimmick to me!

What they are really intending to do, in my most humble opinion, is to increase premiums for those who do not prove that they have a healthy lifestyle.

It also raises serious discrimination issues as far as I'm concerned - people with dissabilities or in less comfortable financial situations may find it hard to regularly attend a gym.

My dad is as still very fit, never drinks and never smokes - due to his early AD he let his life insurance premiums lapse for a couple of months - do you think we had a hope in hell of getting the insurance company to accept the back dated premiums and policy renewal. Insurance companies just want to encourage more fit, low risk individuals on their books. As I say, very sceptical about insurance companies and their gimmicks.

----------------------------
Re, your quesiton: What impact do you think this sort of action will have on people's behaviour?

IMHO - It will make people who are at more risk less likely to take out insurance.

Cheers
Charlie....
 
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Kerry-Jane

Registered User
Feb 9, 2004
25
Surrey
Vascular Dementia and Diet/Medication

Hi there
I have only recently found this thread and am particularly interested as my mum (62) has just been diagnosed with Vascular Dementia and Alzheimers. My mum has never drank in her life and has been a vegetarian for about the last 25 years. although she never really ate a lot of meat before that, and for the past twenty years has watched her diet carefully. I wondered if any other aspects of her life could be looked as possibly contributing. She has been a life long astmatic (inhalers and steroids etc) as well as suffering breast cancer (radiotherapy etc). I just wondered if there could be any link to medication taken over her life?
 

Chris

Registered User
May 20, 2003
243
Re: Would reduced insurance premiums persuade you to exercise?

Originally posted by Sarah Day
Hi Craig

what do people think about the medical insurer in the news today. They are proposing to link premiums to health improvements so for example, if people stop smoking, or visit the gym regularly, they will be rewarded with lower health insurance premiums.

I think there is some evidence that bouts of intense sport activities or gym sessions are bad for you - & that things like regular walking & a high level of daily activity - housework, using stairs not lifts , walk & save buse fares etc is very beneficial. .....difficult to measure though - although (as in BBCs latest progs) - can measure no of steps a day with pedometer. I reckon this is a ploy by Ins co to make more money somehow.
am sure GPs would not approve all our oldies suddenly attending gym !!!!! Mabye the NHS are behind this !!!! Only a joke !!!!!