Has anyone else experienced this?

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by angela53, Feb 20, 2013.

  1. angela53

    angela53 Registered User

    Feb 20, 2013
    8
    Mum (moderate stage of Alzheimer’s), still in her own home with my younger brother as main live-in carer, was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes in January 2012 – I attended an education session regarding diet and she was prescribed medication. By August last year, her weight had drastically decreased (she has gradually lost weight over the last 2-3 years anyway and was never overweight) and she was taken off the medication and told to eat what she wanted. As she doesn’t/can’t cater for herself any more, we could still maintain some control over what she ate and keep the diabetes in check.
    My brother has reported that there are increasing incidences of bowel movements either in the early hours of the morning or at getting up time. Whilst these cannot be classed as diarrhoea and she isn't incontinent, they are sometimes very loose. Due to her dementia and “unlearning” personal skills, he frequently gets up to find a trail from bathroom back to the bedroom; soiled carpets, pyjamas and underwear, not to mention Mum herself. Having spoken to the GP, she suggested that he doesn’t give her any hot drinks at night that may contain a sweetening agent which can cause diarrhoea. The GP also suggested a commode. Mum will never, ever use one – apart from to store ornaments and clothing “ready to go home”.
    Has anyone else experienced this type of problem and can suggest anything to help? Thanks.
     
  2. Grommit

    Grommit Registered User

    Apr 26, 2006
    2,127
    Doncaster
    Hi Angela53.

    Must admit to only coming close to your problems with my wife, Jean.

    If it helps, i found that a visit to the local Incontinence Clinic was very informative and I received a great deal of assistance from the staff there.

    It took about an hours interview with the staff and very clear instructions on the workings of the bowel and bladder.

    I also came away with what is known as a Bristol Stool chart which identifies the type of stools being evacuated and how to alter the consistency etc which has allowed me, over the last few years to control evacuations.
     
  3. SussexDave

    SussexDave Registered User

    Apr 19, 2012
    16
    Hi,

    Yes I have had similar experiences with mum. In mum's not in any way related to diabetes medication but simply that mum does not know how to control an urgent bowel movement. Normal movements are no problem but if the urge is sudden she will simply pass stools wherever she is at the time.

    The only way I have found to manage this is to resort to incontinence panties (pull up kind). As I say mum is not generally incontinent but the panties do "contain" the problem when necessary and this gives me time to get mum to the toilet thus limiting the clean up. Mum also refuses to use a commode. Would your mum be able to wake your brother if something happened, my mum makes sufficient commotion that it wakes me if it is at night and she tells me if something is wrong during the day.

    Hope you find this helpful
     
  4. angela53

    angela53 Registered User

    Feb 20, 2013
    8

    Thanks, that is really helpful - due to see GP next week so will ask for a referral.
     
  5. angela53

    angela53 Registered User

    Feb 20, 2013
    8
    Thank you for replying and yes, very helpful. Unfortunately, she's at the stage where she still values her privacy and has some dignity so will try and conceal accidents or even clear them up, sometimes. She also comes from the generation where if you need to get up in the night, you don't flush the toilet in case it disturbs the rest of the household - you can imagine!! The only good thing is that when this happens my brother is able to insist she goes in the shower (which had become another problem) and he can then get her a completely fresh change of clothes. It's swings and roundabouts at the moment - but all suggestions and responses are helpful.
     

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