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Has anyone else experienced this?

Peace lily

Registered User
Jan 30, 2020
15
I was just wondering if any one else has experience of this problem and could give me advice please. My dad is 87 and has Alzheimer's. He has poor mobility, but gets around using a Zimmer frame. My mum is dad's sole carer. Dad uses the toilet, but does have occasional accidents (mainly because he can't get to the toilet on time). During the summer, dad often used the plant pots or grid to wee in. However on one occasion mum found him just weeing in the living room and has recently stood and done a wee in the middle of the bedroom floor. This is a relatively new thing and don't know what to do? Thanks.
 

Helly68

Registered User
Mar 12, 2018
747
@Peace lily this is a difficult one, and I don't have direct experience.
There is the practical solution - comode in the living room - closer for easier use? Some OT services (or even Boots) have bottles you can pee in. Many people on here recommend a spray product by Dr Benckman designed for cleaning pet-related spills from carpets. You can also get incontinence sheets , or some people use puppy pads, to protect carpets.
I noticed in care homes, there was a regular routine of checking all residents - those able to mobilise to the toilet and those not, ensuring they all went to the toilet regularly. This is a lot of effort at home but may help with avoiding last minute accidents.
Most community services have a continence nurse who should be able to visit and may be able to advise as to other aids or adaptions.
It may also be worth checking with the GP as to the possibility of a urine infection, as these are sadly very prevalent in people with dementia and can affect urgency, as well as a whole range of other things.
Incontinence is awful, I hope this helps.
 

Peace lily

Registered User
Jan 30, 2020
15
@Peace lily this is a difficult one, and I don't have direct experience.
There is the practical solution - comode in the living room - closer for easier use? Some OT services (or even Boots) have bottles you can pee in. Many people on here recommend a spray product by Dr Benckman designed for cleaning pet-related spills from carpets. You can also get incontinence sheets , or some people use puppy pads, to protect carpets.
I noticed in care homes, there was a regular routine of checking all residents - those able to mobilise to the toilet and those not, ensuring they all went to the toilet regularly. This is a lot of effort at home but may help with avoiding last minute accidents.
Most community services have a continence nurse who should be able to visit and may be able to advise as to other aids or adaptions.
It may also be worth checking with the GP as to the possibility of a urine infection, as these are sadly very prevalent in people with dementia and can affect urgency, as well as a whole range of other things.
Incontinence is awful, I hope this helps.
Hi
@Peace lily this is a difficult one, and I don't have direct experience.
There is the practical solution - comode in the living room - closer for easier use? Some OT services (or even Boots) have bottles you can pee in. Many people on here recommend a spray product by Dr Benckman designed for cleaning pet-related spills from carpets. You can also get incontinence sheets , or some people use puppy pads, to protect carpets.
I noticed in care homes, there was a regular routine of checking all residents - those able to mobilise to the toilet and those not, ensuring they all went to the toilet regularly. This is a lot of effort at home but may help with avoiding last minute accidents.
Most community services have a continence nurse who should be able to visit and may be able to advise as to other aids or adaptions.
It may also be worth checking with the GP as to the possibility of a urine infection, as these are sadly very prevalent in people with dementia and can affect urgency, as well as a whole range of other things.
Incontinence is awful, I hope this helps.
Thank you for your reply @Helly68. Incontinence is a difficult problem to deal with and one that my mum finds particularly stressful. My mum does keep a couple of urinals around the house, but maybe she needs some of those incontinence sheets that you mention to out on the floor. I'll definitely mention getting my dad tested for a UTI to rule this out?
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
938
High Peak
It's very difficult but is unfortunately part of the progression of dementia.

With some people, the 'I need to go' signal gets broken so they just do it as and when. In some ways that's easier - incontinence pads/pants at all times. But it sounds like your dad is at the 'forgetting the sequence' stage. Mobility issues mean he doesn't always get there in time but over and above that, if he's still pulling his trousers down that means he knows he needs to go but doing it in random places suggests he's forgotten he needs to be in the toilet first. My mum also reached the stage where she'd make it to the bathroom sometimes but once there couldn't remember what to do next, how to turn round and sit herself on the toilet, etc. Just too many sequential steps to remember.

I'm afraid I don't really have answers other than frequent prompts and a carpet shampooing machine...
 

Hazara8

Registered User
Apr 6, 2015
534
I was just wondering if any one else has experience of this problem and could give me advice please. My dad is 87 and has Alzheimer's. He has poor mobility, but gets around using a Zimmer frame. My mum is dad's sole carer. Dad uses the toilet, but does have occasional accidents (mainly because he can't get to the toilet on time). During the summer, dad often used the plant pots or grid to wee in. However on one occasion mum found him just weeing in the living room and has recently stood and done a wee in the middle of the bedroom floor. This is a relatively new thing and don't know what to do? Thanks.
Alas, incontinence accompanies dementia so very often and each case will prove specific to that person. But the wise suggestion to visit your GP in order to rule out an infection should be noted. I found very helpful practicable support from INCONTINENCE PRODUCTS in respect of protective sheets, pads etc. I used to preempt my mother's unpredictable urgency with a routine visit to the downstairs commode and l carried out a urinalysis check each time. None of this is easy. But once it becomes part and parcel of the ongoing Care then it can prove manageable. Good wishes with finding positive results.
 

Peace lily

Registered User
Jan 30, 2020
15
Alas, incontinence accompanies dementia so very often and each case will prove specific to that person. But the wise suggestion to visit your GP in order to rule out an infection should be noted. I found very helpful practicable support from INCONTINENCE PRODUCTS in respect of protective sheets, pads etc. I used to preempt my mother's unpredictable urgency with a routine visit to the downstairs commode and l carried out a urinalysis check each time. None of this is easy. But once it becomes part and parcel of the ongoing Care then it can prove manageable. Good wishes with finding positive results.
Thank you for taking the time to reply and your helpful advice. Very much appreciated.