1. angeluz

    angeluz Registered User

    Jun 18, 2005
    6
    manila, philippines
    my grandmother was hallucinating last night. she insist on seing things which are'nt really there.. is this really a part of alzeimers? i don't know what to do.. can't wake my sister up because she had a fever last night.. beside's what can she do? i felt so alone... i can take care of her needs, give her a bath and everything. but sometimes things are just too much for me.. i can't stand her yelling more so, i can't stand to see her getting crazy over something... i think i'm going crazy too. i love my grandmother so much. seeing her like this is too much for me to take. i miss the caring grandma i once have but i know that i have to prepare my self because the worst is yet to come..
     
  2. Anne54

    Anne54 Registered User

    Sep 16, 2004
    147
    Nottingham
    Hello angelus
    My husband hallucinates all the time, the only time it upsets him is if I say there is nothing there, otherwise he finds it very entertaining he got very agitated before I realized what was happening. Now he has a good laugh about what ever it is he sees, everyone is different and I know from other posts that hallucinations can be very frightening but have you tried just agreeing with your Gran?
    Anne
     
  3. TED

    TED Registered User

    Sep 14, 2004
    154
    Middlesex
    Hello
    I understand that this would be 'disturbing' for anyone
    My mum is always 'seeing' things and talking to people who arent there, it really bothered me at first because I had no idea how best to respond. (the most regular one is trying to pet our dog Honey......who we sadly had to put down about 15 years ago !)

    Now I go along with it for a short time and then bring the conversation back to one of 'remembering' people and places, esp with the dog cos we always had plenty of long walks with her

    I guess it would depend on what 'things' your gran is seeing? Is there anything specific, is it just shadows and is this just at night?? Sorry for the questions I dont think there is a Y/N answer to this, please try not to worry (easily said I know) I am sure the good people here will have more good advice than I can impart.

    Keep well
    remember your Gran still loves you all
    TED x
     
  4. Jude

    Jude Registered User

    Dear Angelus,

    Hallucinations are a very common part of AD. In the early days, my father used to hallucinate and hold conversations with friends and family who had died years before. It's pretty hard for us to know exactly where AD sufferers go in their heads, so I took the view that although I couldn't see or speak to these people, it didn't necessarily mean that they weren't there or real for Dad.

    I agree with Anne here. Go with the flow on this. If your Gran believes in her hallucinations, then get into it with her if you can. You may learn some valuable things about where she is at the time. She will probably feel a lot less agitated if you go along with her rather than trying to talk her out of it. It's her reality right now, so I figure that's just fine.

    Best wishes,

    Jude
     
  5. Sandy

    Sandy Registered User

    Mar 23, 2005
    6,847
    Dear Angeluz,

    I'm so sorry to hear about your grandmother's condition and the pressures that you are under.

    The UK Alzheimer's Society has fact sheets on many of the aspects of Alzheimer's, including one on hallucinations which you can find here:

    http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/Caring...a/Unusual_behaviour/advice_hallucinations.htm

    Have you checked out the web site of the Alzheimer's Disease Association of the Philippines (ADAP)? It can be found here:

    http://www.alzphilippines.com/home.html

    Take care and keep posting,

    Sandy
     
  6. angeluz

    angeluz Registered User

    Jun 18, 2005
    6
    manila, philippines
    hi everyone,

    thanks for all the info.. it helped me deal with it somehow. now i'm feeling better and grams too. well i guess, i was not use to seeing her like that most specially when she's afraid and kind of violent on what she is seeing. like the other night, she was seeing three huge cat jumping in and out of the window and according to her it is jumping in front of her.. she got violent because the cat wanted to bite her. she wanted to break the window with a stick because there was a cat sitting on it. It totaly freaked me out!!.. BIG TIME! i don't know what to do to calm her down. she became more agitated when i told her that i am not seeing anything, she wanted to hit me....but i was kind of good in avoiding it. now grams is sleeping..


    thanks to you guys for all the advice....


    angeluz
     
  7. Sheila

    Sheila Registered User

    Oct 23, 2003
    2,259
    West Sussex
    Dear Angeluz, I remember one night when all else failed, - apparently there was a man up a ladder in her room, I said, OK, I'll see if he will come downstairs with me. I "asked" the "man" to please come down for a cuppa so we could all go back to sleep and "ushered" him out. Sounds silly, but it actually worked! Love She. XX
     
  8. burnsj

    burnsj Registered User

    Jul 10, 2005
    3
    Formby, Merseyside
    from Jenny

    Hi my name is Jenny, I have just registered today.

    I am 24 and my Grandpa has been through exactly what you are talking about.

    He used to think there were rats in the house, he would think Granny was trying to break into the house. He would make tea for six people when there were only him and Granny there. He thought I was pregnant and asked if I was going to keep it.

    We didnt know if it was a side effect of the drugs he was on or part of the disease. Have you asked your doctor or the memory clinic about trying some medication? Or perhaps coming off medication and trying another type? We found that Grandpa reacts badly to all the Phsychiatric drugs.

    But sometimes when Grandpa thought there were rats in the house it was because he had seen them on the telly and thought it was real. We had to be careful what we talked about and what was on telly, ie the news etc. If life of Grime ever came on we had to turn over straight away before he started.

    We found the only way to deal with him when he was hallucinating was to talk to him. My Granny just could not get through to him, he wouldnt listen to her. However if we went round, he would listen. We would say that there was nobody there and that we would check the house and stay there until he was in bed, just trying to reassure him.

    When he asked me if I was keeping the baby, I just made a big joke of it and said, Grandpa I can assure you there is no baby!! and laughed, he just coppied my behaviour and started laughing too.

    Now when he talks and dosn't make sense we will agree with him as though he is making sense. He will say something like "Theres only three windows" and we will say something like. . "do you think there should be more?" Whereas we would have said originally, what are you talking about?

    I think I may be waffling on. If you need to talk please get intouch. We have been through a lot and I think it will suprise us how similar things will be to your experiences.

    Jenny xx
     
  9. Jude

    Jude Registered User

    Dear Jenny,

    Welcome to TP.

    Hallucinations can be very difficult to deal with can't they? Your comments about the TV programmes are very common symptoms of AD and you seem to be doing a great job answering your grandfather. It's always better to try and get into the delusion, to agree if possible or to make light of it.

    Best wishes,

    Jude
     
  10. approved

    approved Registered User

    Jul 12, 2005
    3
    London
    hallucinations and sleep

    My mother had the same problem, with tablets hallucinations were bad.
    I found the best way is to stop all caffine (use de-caffinated tea or coffee),
    no suger (use sweetners + diabetic suger free jame ect), and no chocolate.

    She sleeps a lot better, no hallucinations or aggression any more
     

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