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Hallucinations - should I just humour him?

NP in Texas

New member
Nov 30, 2020
3
0
My Dad, 88, has not been diagnosed, due to his unwillingness to go to the doctor.
I've had concerns for at least six months now, and his signs are getting worse.
In addition to memory issues, and repetition of conversations, he seems to hallucinate visitors and people staying with him...
When I speak to him on the phone, sometimes I humour him, and sometimes I correct him. If he is talking about my mother, who died two years ago, I have always corrected him, since I thought it inappropriate for him to think she is still alive.
So, what is best for him?
 

Lemondrizzle

Registered User
Aug 26, 2018
141
0
You will see from other threads on here that the hallucinations and not remembering someone has died are usual events in dementia patients. To them, the people they see are very real and there are various tactics mentioned to deal with these. My MIL wouldn't go to bed because "the other people" kept getting in as well. I had to send "the other people" away. Likewise, she often asked for her mum and we in the end used the same story that she was a long way away (her ashes are). There was no point in telling her she had died (many years before) as each time it was like she had only just been told so it was not productive for her.
 

MySween3

New member
Jan 21, 2021
2
0
My Dad, 88, has not been diagnosed, due to his unwillingness to go to the doctor.
I've had concerns for at least six months now, and his signs are getting worse.
In addition to memory issues, and repetition of conversations, he seems to hallucinate visitors and people staying with him...
When I speak to him on the phone, sometimes I humour him, and sometimes I correct him. If he is talking about my mother, who died two years ago, I have always corrected him, since I thought it inappropriate for him to think she is still alive.
So, what is best for him?
If your Dad is in Texas and was a Vet who had prior military service. There are loads of help available. For one he may be very willing to visit a Veterans Clinic, a social worker can speak face to face with him. As with many male Veterans once they meet they have a sort of respect for each other. Talking and sharing seems to come more naturally. Just a thought if he served in US military.
 

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