Hallucinations : Dad and his many wives.

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by jks, Oct 31, 2005.

  1. jks

    jks Registered User

    Jul 2, 2005
    67
    West Yorkshire
    My Dad has periods of being perfectly lucid, and at other times, great confusion.

    In his 'normal' times, he will chat quite happily about what the darker times are like for him. Recently, he seems to be hallucinating - he says that when he walks into the lounge, for example, there will be 8 or 9 other people in there (there's only him and Mum in reality). He says they all look like Mum, are dressed like her, and sound like her. He says he gets so scared that one day, he won't be able to distinguish which one actually is Mum. He also asks Mum if she would like taking home yet, and has also warned her to watch out for the other women who impersonate her. He will ask how many of the others want a cup of tea, or if the loo is free at the moment.

    This is the first time he has 'seen' other people. He has, for many months, spoke about the people in the attic who steal his ornaments in the night, and also the three strange men who are always in the bathroom :eek: , but says he has never seen them, but he just knows that they are there.

    This is causing my Mum considerable distress, as she is worried about what might happen if he didn't realise she was the real one, and what if he gets determined to take her home, as he puts it. This seems to be a throwback to 30 years ago when his own Mum would come over for the day, and he would take her home when she was ready.

    They are going to speak to the CPN about this on his next visit. Mum was quite reluctant to do this, she seems to think there's something embarrasing about it, but I think I've persuaded her that she must be honest and give the CPN the true picture. I'm wondering if there might be some medication to help him. Dad's on Reminyl at the moment, and we thought we could see improvements. Now we're not so sure. It seems that when one aspect of this wicked disease improves, another one gets worse.



    Regards
    jks
     
  2. suem

    suem Registered User

    Jul 1, 2005
    61
    Worcestershire
    Hi jks
    I really feel for you. My husband has hallucinations that quite frankly are destroying both our lives. There are people all over the house--he does not know who they are. They follow him. He finds them threatning, laughing at him. He moves cushions all round the house. Says they are putting powder on the animals and hurting them. Wants locks put on doors and windows. Wakes up all though the night because they are in the bed, don't know when I last had a good night sleep.There are carol singers at the door. He thinks I am too friendly with them. I've played along with it, talking to them. Have told him they are not real, although now I don't think he can tell them from reality. You name it I have done it.
    He has just been started on Seroquel to help the hallucinations-----I pray to God it works. The problem is that he also has Parkinson's so it is very hard to give drugs that won't effect the Parkinson's.
    You must take it up with all the medical people--get as much help as you can
    Sue
     
  3. jks

    jks Registered User

    Jul 2, 2005
    67
    West Yorkshire
    Hi Sue
    Thanks for your reply. I do hope your husbands medication helps. I guess that in comparison, my Dads imaginary people are quite benign (so far at least). They are all 'clones' of Mum. They don't speak to him, or acknowledge him in any way. They are just there, and he doesn't understand why.

    Most of the time I feel so desperately sorry for the anguish and suffering my Mum goes through with Dad. She is in a wheelchair following a stroke earlier this year, so can't even walk away for 5 minutes. Although he has never been physically abusive towards her, she is scared that he might. And I am so angry with him. But then I try and think what it must be like for him. The sheer bewilderment of seeing things that don't exist, for not knowing which one is your wife.....it's unimaginable.

    I will keep everything crossed for you, Sue.

    jks
     
  4. Stimpfig

    Stimpfig Registered User

    Oct 15, 2005
    135
    Germany/India
    Hi jks

    Hallucinations can make a carer miserable. My mother has them continuously. As I reported in another thread, my mum has already smashed our front door made of glass using a small wooden sculpture , during one of her agitated/aggressive bouts and at this time, she was having auditory hallucinations .She was being given instructions by God which compelled her to follow them. She continuously threw food into bins for a couple of weeks as she was being told that they were poisoned. Now the situation is a bit under control with change of medication - but she still hallucinates, only she isn't afraid of them anymore. She is constantly seeing snakes and tigers hiding in corners, a horrible man laughing at her in the bathroom - she would make such a fuss going to the toilet. For a while, she was seeing four of me : I was the girl who gave her a shower/bath, then I was Mrs Stimpfig and at another time, I was her daughter and of late, I am her mother.

    Sue Stimpfig
     

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