• All threads and posts regarding Coronavirus COVID-19 can be found in our area specifically for Coronavirus COVID-19 discussion.

    You can directly access this area >here<.

Hallucinating.

MackTwelve

Registered User
May 28, 2022
32
0
For the last two days my mother has been hallucinating, basically from morning until bedtime (I try to humour her and go along with her visions) at times it's difficult not to get frustrated and lose control (by control I mean going against her delusions and correcting her). I have to keep an eye on her every minute also which gets' on her nerves. It's at these times she's more likely to fall I believe. I take it hallucinating is part of the course, how do other people cope? I'm quite shattered to be honest, she won't stop talking and fidgeting also. At what stage of dementia are hallucinations common? I hope this post makes sense? And I hope these visions aren't going to last more than a few days at a time.
 

canary

Registered User
Feb 25, 2014
18,895
0
South coast
Hello @MackTwelve
Has your mum been checked for an infection - particularly a UTI or covid?
Infections cause absolute havoc in people with dementia and if there is a sudden downturn, or appearance of new dementia symptoms, its always wise to get it checked out.
 

MackTwelve

Registered User
May 28, 2022
32
0
Hi @canary I should have stated no UTI, urine test this morning and we don't get out much so I don't think Covid. I have contacted GP but they can't seem to help and getting hold of a Psych is nearly impossible here. Mother does hallucinate from time to time but not lasted this long before.
 

MackTwelve

Registered User
May 28, 2022
32
0
Just an update, mother had three falls Friday night because of her hallucinations. She is now in hospital after waiting 20 hours for an ambulance to come and convey her there! (Then 8 hours outside in the ambulance before being admitted) Luckily she has not broken any bones, the doctors are saying they will arrange Physio and OT for her as her walking (shuffling) is bad and then discharge her. I'm not happy about this so I'm going to phone Social Worker and insist she gets a proper Psych assessment before coming home. Would members agree this is the right thing for me to do?
 

Linsac

Registered User
Aug 14, 2020
91
0
As she is in hospital now, I think it would be the hospital social worker who you need to speak to. Ring the ward and ask to speak to the discharge team. Tell them you will not accept her coming home until she has been assessed. Mention unsafe discharge. So sorry to hear she had such a horrendous wait to get to hospital-unacceptable for anyone let alone and elderly patient.
 

Jaded'n'faded

Registered User
Jan 23, 2019
3,430
0
High Peak
Wow - an emergency ambulance and it takes 28 hours to get your poor mum into hospital. Scandalous :(

@Linsac gives good advice - refuse the discharge till your mum has been fully assessed and a full care plan is in place.
 

T1000

Registered User
Feb 3, 2022
130
0
So sorry to hear that @MackTwelve must be super worrying. I can't believe they took so long to get to you, completely unnacceptable as @Linsac says. I hope the social worker can get you some help going forward.
 

Palerider

Registered User
Aug 9, 2015
3,190
0
North West
For the last two days my mother has been hallucinating, basically from morning until bedtime (I try to humour her and go along with her visions) at times it's difficult not to get frustrated and lose control (by control I mean going against her delusions and correcting her). I have to keep an eye on her every minute also which gets' on her nerves. It's at these times she's more likely to fall I believe. I take it hallucinating is part of the course, how do other people cope? I'm quite shattered to be honest, she won't stop talking and fidgeting also. At what stage of dementia are hallucinations common? I hope this post makes sense? And I hope these visions aren't going to last more than a few days at a time.
Hallucinations are common especially mid to later stages and they can continue indefinately, its part and parcel of the disease itself sadly.

I agree with the others on here refuse any discharge until there has been an appropriate assessment around her mental health needs, because clearly she is able to mobilise and physio / OT input is only partially useful. More importantly if these hallucinations are distressing then that requires some further consideration in terms of an opinion on some type of treatment.
 

MackTwelve

Registered User
May 28, 2022
32
0
Thanks everyone. I have refused discharge until she has a Psych Liaison or Assessment. The emotional pressure the hospital 'Floor Manager' is putting on me to let them send her home is horrendous. Quote ~ "She may not be the same person you remember if kept here because being in a strange environment can affect her irreversibly" and "We can't guarantee that she won't start wondering about and maybe fall again etc" ~ "We'll do are best to keep an eye on her but we can't be there every minute as we are extremely busy". I appreciate the NHS is under pressure, the medical staff I'm convinced are doing their best. It's the management running it that are ruthless! O by the way mother is still in an ED bed, no beds on ward to take her apparently.
 
Last edited:

MackTwelve

Registered User
May 28, 2022
32
0
Wow - an emergency ambulance and it takes 28 hours to get your poor mum into hospital. Scandalous :(

@Linsac gives good advice - refuse the discharge till your mum has been fully assessed and a full care plan is in place.
Yes it's unbelievable, the crew who arrived said their response time had only been 5 hours! Then they told me that it was likely the that the 'Clock' had been restarted when their shift started. This is what they do to keep statistics in line with what is expected of them. :mad:
 

SamiB

New member
Jun 28, 2022
9
0
As she is in hospital now, I think it would be the hospital social worker who you need to speak to. Ring the ward and ask to speak to the discharge team. Tell them you will not accept her coming home until she has been assessed. Mention unsafe discharge. So sorry to hear she had such a horrendous wait to get to hospital-unacceptable for anyone let alone and elderly patient.
Yes it's unbelievable, the crew who arrived said their response time had only been 5 hours! Then they told me that it was likely the that the 'Clock' had been restarted when their shift started. This is what they do to keep statistics in line with what is expected of them. :mad:
I don't know if I'm a bit late to this but please tell the sister of the ward that you want a care package put in place before she comes home. Tell them your reasons and they have to by law have the hospital social worker come to talk to you and your mum. Don't let them discharge her without this in place as it can mean you have regular carers come in, if your not coping. They can help with meals etc and even put in respite care. I'm so sorry your dealing with this and I can relate on the ambulance front as I'm disabled and have spent many hours waiting for one or inside one outside of the hospital. This is the NHS falling apart but fight for what is right for you both. I wish you all the best and my mam hallucinates randomly and we are still waiting for a diagnosis. Chin up, it's ok to feel angry and annoyed but change that to 'getting her and your care regardless' energy. You got this ❤
 

MackTwelve

Registered User
May 28, 2022
32
0
Thank you @SamiB Mother is finally on an Elderly Patient Ward, I was allowed to visit today and she seems a lot calmer thankfully but still fairly confused when I saw here but less depressed (Possibly due to having a more stimulating environment with more people interacting with her rather than just me at home). They have a Dementia nurse on the ward who I'll be talking to tomorrow. They seem to be doing some assessments and monitoring her, they will be contacting our Social Worker to try to arrange some things, what exactly I'm not sure yet but the Social Worker has advised me to 'Play Hardball' and not give in to their pressure. By doing so it will give her more time to arrange 'Care Package' etc I think and will allow myself some respite, even though I feel guilty not bringing her home.
 

SamiB

New member
Jun 28, 2022
9
0
Pl
Thank you @SamiB Mother is finally on an Elderly Patient Ward, I was allowed to visit today and she seems a lot calmer thankfully but still fairly confused when I saw here but less depressed (Possibly due to having a more stimulating environment with more people interacting with her rather than just me at home). They have a Dementia nurse on the ward who I'll be talking to tomorrow. They seem to be doing some assessments and monitoring her, they will be contacting our Social Worker to try to arrange some things, what exactly I'm not sure yet but the Social Worker has advised me to 'Play Hardball' and not give in to their pressure. By doing so it will give her more time to arrange 'Care Package' etc I think and will allow myself some respite, even though I feel guilty not bringing her home.
Please do not feel guilty about having some time out. If your not coping the you won't be doing either of yourselves any favours. You really do have to play hard ball. You can refuse to have her home until an OT has come put to assess the house if that's not already done and to put in things like safety rails etc if they aren't already there. Also the long term adult social care team can help provide carers to help with personal care and meal times. This gives you a little more time to get you ready for the day. There is respite care and it's heartbreaking but you have to look after you. It's not selfish or unloving in any way. I worked for the NHS and I loved working with dementia patients but I also saw the struggles and exhaustion in families faces. Now I'm on the other side waiting for a diagnosis of my own mum who was hard work before any concerns about the dementia was even mentioned. I use to fight for the patients families as I was a young carer from 10yrs old and I know how hard it can get. Just remember your not alone and if I can help with advice or just a rant then I'm here. It's ok to cry too and laugh at rubbish movies, that's something I'm helping my dad with whose also disabled and elderly but the main carer. I live next door and always on hand when I can be. There are groups that can help patients with dementia get out to meet others for a cuppa or a chat. It's worth looking into those if you haven't already, hope I'm not just telling you things you already know. I'm new here sadly but if I can help others then it's a blessing in disguise.