Good but bizarre conversation.

Discussion in 'ARCHIVE FORUM: Support discussions' started by jenniferpa, Aug 17, 2006.

  1. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    My Mother called me today (not unusual as she normally calls me several times a day, or night). However, instead of the normal "I don't know why I called you" I got "I just wanted to let you know how it went at the dentist today..." and off we went, how much she liked her new teeth, how much better they were than the old ones, when she's expecting to get them etc., we then segued into how one of her carers had taken her out in her wheelchair yesterday (Yesterday? She can't normally remember if she's eaten lunch five minutes ago). Other points touched on were how she'd broken her radio and asking where I'd put the other one (I had put it away as well) and various other things. It was so weird - she's not been this much together since before the stroke. In fact, when I said I'd get her carer to get the radio out, she pointed out in no uncertain terms that she was quite capable of doing this for herself, and she didn't want to be treated like one of the nursing home residents who were too unaware to do such things for themselves! Last week, she couldn't grasp that there was a nursing home next door!

    The only thing that's changed, as far as I know, is that her anti-depressants have been increased. I don't expect that this will last, but it was a pleasure to have a "normal" conversation.

    Jennifer
     
  2. Amy

    Amy Registered User

    Jan 4, 2006
    3,453
    Hiya Jennifer,
    Enjoy it while it lasts!
    Amy
     
  3. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #3 Margarita, Aug 17, 2006
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2006
    I say do not enjoy it because when the realization hit you in what is really happening in your future or when ever it not a very nice feeling. Sorry, if the truth hurt. However, I wish I were still in denial.

    I wondered why people go into denial ? I understand now denial does give you pain , but life go on

    sorry I know your only shareing to undertand it all .
     
  4. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,594
    Kent
    Get pleasure wherever you can jennifer and whenever you can. It`s better to laugh than cry and we all know there`s plenty to cry about.

    This morning, before we went out, I noticed my husband [aged 74] had forgotten to fasten his trousers.

    `Zip up your trousers,` I said, `you don`t want people to think you`re a `dirty old man`.
    He zipped them up, then said `I never think of myself as old!`

    Hope no-one`s offended by this, but I had to laugh.

    Grannie G
     
  5. Kathleen

    Kathleen Registered User

    Mar 12, 2005
    639
    West Sussex
    Hello Jennifer

    It is fantastic when we get them back for a while, moments like these are precious.

    Let's hope it lasts a while longer for you both.

    Kathleen
     
  6. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,594
    Kent
    Are you having a bad time, Margarita? Your pain comes through and I hurt for you.

    I know we have to face the truth but we must grasp any light on the horizon with both hands.

    My husband was awarded Attendance Allowance today. He was thrilled when the letter came as he only saw it as extra money. He couldn`t understand why I was in floods of tears.

    Then a while later, we had the incident with the trousers [see above ] and I was laughing through my tears.

    I hope tomorrow will be easier for you.

    With love Grannie G
     
  7. Margarita

    Margarita Registered User

    Feb 17, 2006
    10,824
    london
    #7 Margarita, Aug 17, 2006
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2006
    Sorry If I sound hard .

    yes my Reality is painful now; I cannot seem to understand why I should hide it I know it pass I am in a good mood as my daughter got 2 A level one in Health social care and one in child physiology she found out today

    Mum would have been so pleased if she could understand it like she did before AD, but next week we shall all go out for a family meal to celebrate she enjoy that even if she does not undertand what is happening and she make us all lol she always does .


    I did read
    It did make me :) .

    Glad to hear that I am not the only one that does that
    Thanks for shareing
     
  8. DickG

    DickG Registered User

    Feb 26, 2006
    558
    Stow-on-the-Wold
    Margarita

    Pass on my congratulations to your daughter. Concentrate on the positive events in life and celebrate your daughters success, there is always good amongst the bad. I am sure your mum will enjoy the celebration although she may not know what it is all about and your daughter will always remember that her grandmother was the to celebrate her success.

    Hugs

    Dick
     
  9. Grannie G

    Grannie G Volunteer Moderator

    Apr 3, 2006
    69,594
    Kent
    Well done to your daughter, Margarita. You must be very proud of her and she should be proud of herself.

    I didn`t think you were being hard. I thought you were having a bad day/week/month. You are entitled to.

    Love Grannie G
     
  10. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    Congratulations to your daughter Margarita, and no, I don't mind if you rain on my parade! Actually, having done some research on Celexa (the anti-depressant my Mother is on), it has been used with some success to alleviate confusion in individuals with non AD dementia. So, I'll keep my fingers crossed.

    Jennifer
     
  11. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    Update = 3 weeks later

    I'm adding this on in case anyone does a search in the future for the effects of anti-depressants (specifically citalopram) on VD sufferers.

    Well - I am just amazed! 3 weeks after upping the dosage she remains much more "on the ball" I still get an occasional middle of the night (for her) call saying she's upset but can't remember why, but when she's wide awake she can actually remember what has been happening and what is going to happen. The downside is that she is now aware that there is a nursing home next door, and has been trying to make me promise not to put her "in there with those loobys (her words)" All I'm commiting to is not to do so until she's at the point where she has no objections, although even these conversations have their good side in that there is actually an exchange of ideas, rather than simple repetition.

    So if you think your loved one is depressed, do consider anti-depressants. They don't work for everyone, but the benefits may be more than you would expect.

    Jennifer
     
  12. Mimi22

    Mimi22 Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    1
    Canada
    Hi Jennifer, I have shared a similar experience with my father who has dementia and suffered a stroke just before last xmas. His speech was extremely garbled and made no sense at all. Since that time he has been on Aricept and it is helping him with his short term memory.
    We of course have good days and bad but the good ones are the blessings we need to carry on with this awful illness. Hold on to the lovely conversations they will be the glue when you feel like falling apart.
    Mimi
     
  13. jenniferpa

    jenniferpa Volunteer Moderator

    Jun 27, 2006
    39,439
    Hi Mimi

    Welcome to TP. I see you're in Canada. I'm down in wet and dreary Pennsylvania, but my Mother is in the UK. Does your father have a diagnosis of AD as well as the stroke? I ask, because in the UK they won't prescribe Aricept unless you have an AD diagnosis (my mother, like your father, had a stroke which left her in this situation). A great pity, because although it doen't help everyone, it does help some people. I'd be willing to pay for the darn stuff, but that's not the way the NHS works.

    Jennifer
     

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