1. bel

    bel Registered User

    Apr 26, 2006
    757
    coventry
    has any one any experience
    hubby has frontal lobe dementia which has moved to the temporal lobe i am finding understanding what he is trying to say harder and harder
    love bel x
     
  2. mel

    mel Registered User

    Apr 30, 2006
    1,656
    Sheffield
    Hi Bel
    the type of dementia my mum has is still unknown but in the past month I too find difficult what she is talking about.....this makes her very angry if i don't understand.....it must be very frustrating to the sufferer.........
     
  3. bel

    bel Registered User

    Apr 26, 2006
    757
    coventry
    mel
    hubby has only half being diagnoised with frontal lobe dementia and temporal dementia they seem to sit on the fence
    from what i have heard
    there are so many types of dementia all are diffrent
    do you feel like its having a grown up child but do you do like me try to treat them as normal l
    love bel xx
     
  4. Sandy

    Sandy Registered User

    Mar 23, 2005
    6,847
    bel,

    Have you ever taken a look at the Pick's Disease Support Group? They exist specifically to support people with frontotemporal dementia and their carers. You might want to have a look at their web site:

    http://www.pdsg.org.uk/index.php

    Take care,

    Sandy
     
  5. Helena

    Helena Registered User

    May 24, 2006
    715
    Even Vascular Dementia patients talk gobbly goof at times and my Mother would get furious because you could not fathom out what she was trying to say

    I dont think it matters what form of dementia it is .......the problem in their brain gives much the same results
     
  6. mel

    mel Registered User

    Apr 30, 2006
    1,656
    Sheffield
    Hi Bel
    Yes it is like having a grown up child....and yes i do try and treat mum as normal but it can be very frustrating at times...especially when she has a tantrum:eek:
     
  7. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Hi Bel

    My husband John has tremendous communication problems. His consultant now says (after six years) that he probably has Primary Progressive Aphasia, which may or may mot be a sub-group of AD. In fact, no-one really knows all the ins and outs of this disease, and as he says, the only was to know is by post-mortem - rather a drastic way to get a diagnosis!

    On the posiitive side, the AD symptoms don't seem to show as rapid progression as with other forms.

    On the negative side, as you know, it's difficult to hold a conversation, and that leads to increased isolation for the carer. It's important to keep up with outside interests and friends.

    Good luck,
     
  8. janjan

    janjan Registered User

    Jan 27, 2006
    229
    Birmingham
    Hazel, I't so cruel on the carer, about a year ago i was on the phone talking to mom, and after i put the phone down i had fogot to tell her somthing and picked up the phone to ring her again. She ,hadn't put the phone down properly and i could hear her talking away to dad [ who has AD ] i couldn't hear dad reply to anything mom was talking about. It was just as if she was having a conversation with herself. Mom didn't know i could hear her. I never told her about it, but it upset me at the time, bacause it made me realise how much she must miss having a normal chat. Not living with AD 24/7 there are things you proberly don't realise goes wrong. Dad only talks in a few word sentances now. And you can see him trying so hard to make you understand what he has said. On an up note i can still make him laugh and smile though and thats worth anything he has to tell me. :) Janet :)
     
  9. Skye

    Skye Registered User

    Aug 29, 2006
    17,000
    SW Scotland
    Janet,

    Your dad sounds exactly like John. He tries so hard to talk to me, and it's so frustrating for both of us when I can't understand him.

    Like your dad, he still has a sense of humour, and it makes it all worth while when we can laugh together.
     
  10. bel

    bel Registered User

    Apr 26, 2006
    757
    coventry
    thanks all
    i know i am not alone thank God hubby has a daft sence of hummor
    but today has been a bad day any thing out of routine seems to make him worse
    it is so hard cos life is not normal
    love Bel x
     
  11. janjan

    janjan Registered User

    Jan 27, 2006
    229
    Birmingham
    He's in a n/home now. I go to see him twice a week if i can, because it's traveling on two buses to get there, if i go on the night he's usually very tired if i wait for hubby to take me in the car after work. If i say to dad [ Have you any stories to tell me today ] , he laugh's and try's to say no stories . We both laugh and i say ok i'll tell you one then. Silly realy but work's every time. God bless you both.:)
     
  12. janjan

    janjan Registered User

    Jan 27, 2006
    229
    Birmingham
    Hi Bel. Mom tried to treat dad as if things was normal, but found with some things she had to treat him in a child like way. She had days when she got frustrated with him. If he was sundowning alot it didn't help , or if he was unwell in himself his speach was worse. Hope you have a better day tomorrow.
     
  13. bel

    bel Registered User

    Apr 26, 2006
    757
    coventry
    i spoke to hubbys friend today
    he is also not well but he is retired due ill health parkinsons cancer heart etc but a great daft irish guy he helps keep hubby going bless him he said hubby has told him he cant do anything right so like we said he now knows he is not so capable but i still want him to feel capable i dont want to make him feel like i am a mum never have but i can see he needs this
    sorry bel x
     
  14. Nutty Nan

    Nutty Nan Registered User

    Nov 2, 2003
    787
    Buckinghamshire
    Bel, I know: it's a really tricky balancing act, and you won't always get it right.
    But you are doing a grand job, and even if frustration creeps in now and then, hubby will know how much you care and that you are doing all to make things as good as they can be.

    Take care, and don't be too hard on yourself!
     

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