1. worf

    worf Registered User

    Aug 8, 2015
    6
    redditch
    I've been looking after my OH for several years now she is in the middle stages of Alzheimer's. I had a full time job which I reduced my hours from 37.5 to 30 over last 18mths to enable me to do more at home etc. Over the past 6mths I've been considering reducing hours further as OH has deteriorated slightly (Possibly due to irregular eating and not much self motivation). Anyways onto main reason for post, the company I was working for has been having a few problems and rather abruptly has closed making all who worked there redundant!. I can claim some redundancy and pay owing from the government but now I'm torn between if I should just become a full time carer or try and find another job? The company I was working for was very understanding and flexible with my home situation, also my OH was fine with me not being at home every day between certain hours, and as we all know with this awful disease change can be a nightmare. Im under no illusions as to how difficult a task it is to care for someone who has mood swings , goldfish memory etc and will only get worse.I do most things around the house now including cooking and have done for 2yrs (not complaining )Main question is I've applied for carers allowance , can i apply for anything else and how do i protect my national insurance contributions as I'm still 8 years from retirement? Should i try and get part time work? Sorry for the long post and sort of rambling .
     
  2. Shedrech

    Shedrech Volunteer Moderator

    Dec 15, 2012
    7,876
    Yorkshire
    hi @worf
    sorry to hear of your redundancy
    personally, I'd weigh up how you yourself feel about not working ... as you say, the lack of income will affect both your present and future finances but there's also the aspect of having something that gets you out and socialising with others and is a way of being 'you' not 'carer' ... maybe a part time role would suit now
    there's a page on the main AS site
    https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/get-support/legal-financial/benefits-dementia#content-start
    and the Gov site
    https://www.gov.uk/benefits-calculators
    and
    https://www.gov.uk/carers-allowance

    receiving carer's allowance will cover your NI contribution as long as you recive it
     
  3. canary

    canary Registered User

    Feb 25, 2014
    10,185
    Female
    South coast
    Hi @worf
    If you get carers allowence this will automatically pay your NI. Im still a few years off state pension, so I am thankful that it is paid.

    I dont know what other benefits are available, it might be worthwhile asking someone like Age UK or Citizens Advice.
    You are actually able to claim CA even if you are working - so long as its under £123 a week (I think thats right, its changed recently) so you might be able to get a very part-time job as well as the CA to help with finances.
     
  4. Beate

    Beate Registered User

    May 21, 2014
    11,694
    Female
    London
    The moment I gave up work I wondered how I had ever managed while working, even part time! There were so many hospital appointments, things to organise, people to phone and NHS deliveries to wait for, and you get used very quickly to not having a job, I can tell you. Caring can be all consuming, and it's a slippery slope, as other people also get used to making appointments with you at all hours. So do be aware of that, and if you need work, try and find work.
     
  5. Mousehill

    Mousehill Registered User

    Nov 28, 2018
    10
    I've just given up work. The slightly annoying thing is that no sooner had my resignation been accepted, the company announced they were offering a batch of voluntary redundancies - but that's another story!!!

    If you can make ends meet on Carer's Allowance and a bit of part-time, low stress work, I'd say go for it. I've been out of paid employment a fortnight now and until I stopped, I never realised just what a toll it was having.

    OH works long hours during the summer and I've been principal carer for mum, who lives a 5 minute drive away, for nearly 2 years. I've been rather in denial about the state of our own family home and domestic paperwork, but it's so great now I feel I can finally get on top of things.

    I've given myself a month to sort out all things domestic and get myself back on track and then I've arranged to pick up a bit of part-time work under the CA threshold. I've realised over the last few days how much I'd been using work as a sort of 'counter-stress' to blank out how worried I am about mum and how ashamed and angry with myself about letting our family home fall into such a muddle (we don't have children, so at least no children were affected)

    Many a working day, when mum's carers came in (2 days a week) I'd be working from home in my pyjamas because literally, there were no clean clothes apart from the really formal stuff (so it was jimjams or posh frock :D) and on the days I had to venture to the office or a site, I'd be getting home from mum's around 11pm after settling her to bed, cleaning her teeth and locking up and then rooting around a very messy wardrobe and laundry basket, trying to recall where everything was!

    OH and I have agreed that this month is 'catch-up and sort-out month' and I can't explain the relief that I've made that decision to step off the treadmill. I'd forgotten what 'not stressed' felt like!
     
  6. wonderfulmum

    wonderfulmum Registered User

    Aug 20, 2015
    18
    Hi I gave up work after redundancy as mum needed me more. I got in touch with Welfare Rights and they were so helpful and advised me in all the benefits I should and needed to apply for, from help with utility bills to money for some time out with friends for me, I felt emotionally drained. Give them a call, they will help.
     

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