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Getting over too much sleep

Discussion in 'I care for a person with dementia' started by Greyone, Feb 5, 2015.

  1. Greyone

    Greyone Registered User

    Sep 11, 2013
    382
    Male
    UK
    Less than 2 weeks ago my mum spent a long weekend just sleeping in bed, part and parcel of dementia I believe. Last week it was my sisters turn to look after our mum, whilst her time was mixed between sleeping and being up. This week it has been my turn and I'm pleased to say her wakefulness and mobility are returning.

    I am hoping that this week her independence will continue to return.

    One thing struck me like a brick this week. Put simply, what are the right (and wrong) things to do ? I know that this sleeping affliction is supposed to be different for each person, but then again everything is. I'm not expecting an easy or simple answer to this but I'm thinking and hoping that as so many people have been faced with this Is and survived that there may be a bunch of things to do and avoid that may be true for many people.

    Whilst making sure she is well and sufficiently mobile, I have tried not to make her dependant on me whilst being off and today , since she is ok, I have withdrawn from her company, so she can do as she wishes, as if on her own.

    My biggest concern is that I have not really done anything toward her rehabilitation.

    I would be pleased to her from anyone who has ideas on having a positive effect on the recovery from prolonged sleep for someone with vascular dementia.
     
  2. piph

    piph Registered User

    Feb 4, 2013
    1,530
    Northamptonshire
    This is the first time I've seen a post about this 'prolonged sleep'. I've been staying with my mum for the last few weeks, and although I knew about the fact that she seemed to be spending more time in bed than was good for her, I just assumed she was being lazy, or her back was playing up - these are the explanations that she was giving. However since we've been here, she has had two prolonged sessions in bed for at least 2 days, sometimes three, where she has spent most of the time asleep, not eating much or drinking much in that time. I began to get worried and spoke to the GP on the phone who assured me that it was normal ( I did another post about this a couple of weeks ago). She told me to encourage mum to get up every day, but if she refused then just to leave her to sleep, which I did yesterday and the day before. She just kept complaining that 'she needed a really good sleep'. Today she woke about 11 am, and got up about an hour later, and has been sitting in her chair ever since, having dozed a bit this afternoon.

    I don't think that there is anything you can do towards 'rehabilitation' apart from what you are already doing - allow her to do what she wants, when she wants, which is what I'm doing. Sometimes Mum says she wants a day on her own and that's why she stays in bed, but I think that she just is overcome by sleepiness and just has to sleep, so now I'm letting her get on with it. I too have tried not to let her become too dependant on me, and I try not to wait on her too much - if she's hungry then she has to get up and get something to eat. When she's up and about, I do the cooking, but I'm going to not wait on her in bed and i'm encouraging her to do things for herself.
     
  3. Greyone

    Greyone Registered User

    Sep 11, 2013
    382
    Male
    UK
    Alas , you are so right. For my mum at least they appear to pass. I tried to attribute them to various activities such as visits from the IRN, Community Matron , Social Workers ect and tried to predict for my own peace of mind when they would happen and when they would end, with only limited success. As the weeks went by, they because more irregular and for longer periods, so i gave up gusssing and just did my best for her.

    The whole thing came to a head recently when it took us two hours to get mum up to bed one night, we called the doctor who just said UTI , she was in bed sleeping most of the time for just over a week, Then she seemed to get better during week 2 and started to exercise, had a couple of falls and ended up in EAU for a few days. The end result is that she is now not safe to leave at home, so she is now in a local home with nursing care.

    So i consider myself very lucky to have bypassed much possible trouble Thanks very much indeed for your reply.
     

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