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Getting into the Car

Outlawa

New member
Jan 31, 2019
5
My Dad has advanced alzheimer's. He has started to find it difficult to sit down in a chair, it seems like he can't work out how to do it. This is particularly difficult getting him in and out of the car. Does anyone know of any devices to help or have any top tips. He has also tried to open the door whilst the car is moving. Do you know if you can get a child lock for the front of a car? Many thanks Anna
 

Bunpoots

Volunteer Host
Apr 1, 2016
4,596
Nottinghamshire
Welcome to Dementia Talking Point

You might find this video helpful.


I don’t know of any child lock for the front of the car. Perhaps the back seat would be safer.
 

Outlawa

New member
Jan 31, 2019
5
That's really helpful, thanks very much. When you're trying to work it out for yourself in the moment, it's hard to step back and think logically about it. Sadly I'm not sure he would be willing to get in the back, he was used to being the driver.
 

Bunpoots

Volunteer Host
Apr 1, 2016
4,596
Nottinghamshire
That's really helpful, thanks very much. When you're trying to work it out for yourself in the moment, it's hard to step back and think logically about it. Sadly I'm not sure he would be willing to get in the back, he was used to being the driver.
My dad would never get in the back either so I just locked all the doors when we got in. Not ideal if you have a accident and emergency services can’t get in the car to help...but I felt stopping dad undoing the door while we were moving was more important at the time. My car is 18yrs old so I don’t know if this is possible with a newer car.
 

Jale

Registered User
Jul 9, 2018
467
Mum had problems and arthritis in knees didn't help. We didn't have one but I'm sure there is something like a swivel seat for cars I think it is like a mini turntable and I don't know how good they are. We also got a car cane from Argos to help her get out as she could never work out where to put her hands, I use it and they are good. As for opening doors if they are electric locking then can you not lock it from the drivers side (like an override), hope that makes sense
 

Dimpsy

Registered User
Sep 2, 2019
1,409
Mum had problems and arthritis in knees didn't help. We didn't have one but I'm sure there is something like a swivel seat for cars I think it is like a mini turntable and I don't know how good they are. We also got a car cane from Argos to help her get out as she could never work out where to put her hands, I use it and they are good. As for opening doors if they are electric locking then can you not lock it from the drivers side (like an override), hope that makes sense
My MiL had a swivel seatpad for the car, it really helped her getting in/out after she had both knees done in succession.
 

charlie10

Registered User
Dec 20, 2018
397
My MiL had a swivel seatpad for the car, it really helped her getting in/out after she had both knees done in succession.
If you haven't got the 'turntable' I used a sheet of plastic (tablecloth, plastic bag etc) to sit on when I had my hips done....made the swivelling process much easier :)
 

LadyA

Registered User
Oct 19, 2009
13,603
Ireland
This video is excellent. Other tips I would add, which worked really well for my husband, were:
Keep a couple of brightly coloured cloths in the car. Dementia affects depth perception and spatial awareness. To a pwd, the floor of the car, that you are expecting them to get into, is just a yawning black hole. They have no idea how deep it is, or how far down the floor is. Similarly, getting out of the car, tarmac can look like there's actually nothing there. So, putting a brightly coloured cloth down for them to aim at, immediately shows them where to safely put their feet. Another trick, which I had to use a few times, was to just walk my husband back in to the supermarket, and back out to the car. Eventually, it would just "click" almost like a reflex action, and he would get in the car with no problem. Walking him back into the shop and back out just broke that "stuck" thing.