1. Norman

    Norman Registered User

    Oct 9, 2003
    4,348
    Birmingham Hades
    An AD sufferer is receiving mail and entering competitions and other things and getting in debt to companies who send the unsolicited mail.
    How can the mail be stopped,quickly?
    Norman

    This is a request from another AD support group and urgent
     
  2. Kriss

    Kriss Registered User

    May 20, 2004
    513
    Shropshire
    Definitely register with the mail preference service (easy via their website) and the telephone preference service but it does take a little while for all of the junk mail to filter out. Odd ones still come through but I have insufficient energy at present to make a complaint about them - maybe one day! I would recommend speaking to someone at the Citizens Advice Bureau about what has already happened and if their is any way to recover any losses. If the person affected has dealt direct with the companies involved previously then usually someone has to contact them direct to advise of the problem. I would be inclined to use a bit of a threat here to make sure it is taken seriously but once again the CAB will probably advise.

    Does anyone have power of attorney? If so then it may be time to register it and then this can be used when advising firms direct.

    Apart from intercepting incoming mail I'm not sure what else can be done. With an EPA I was able to redirect Aunts mail while she was in hospital though the post office did write direct to her address to check my instruction was valid - once again in the circumstances I was able to intercept this and therefore avoided any confrontation. It was all quite horrible at the time but looking back I no longer feel at all guilty as everything was done to protect Aunt.

    Kriss
    ps I had more than 1 direct phone call from "charities" when we were sorting her house contents and they all went away with fleas in their ears - the whole episode wound me up no end.
     
  3. Sheila

    Sheila Registered User

    Oct 23, 2003
    2,259
    West Sussex
    We had similar with my Mum, cancer charity had her selling raffle tickets, course she got in one big muddle. I sent them a terse letter when I found out. I was alerted by her sheltered housing warden. Mum had been going round knocking on doors!! We never heard any more thank goodness. Its worrying just how much this happens to those still in the early stages when they are still thinking there is nothing wrong. So many scams they could fall for etc. Don't know how to protect them other than the suggestions already given though. Love She. XX :mad:
     
  4. JANICE

    JANICE Registered User

    Jun 28, 2005
    23
    SOUTHAMPTON
    I have found this a problem with Keith being at home on his own during the day. He has made appointments for double glazing,demo of an automatic bed, signed up for new credit cards, agreed to charity collecting etc. Luckily most of the companies seem to phone back to confirm the appointments etc and I tell them the problem and they soon ring off!! But I agree it is very worrying - I never know what he will sign us up for next. I have registered with the telephone preference service which seems to work at first but after a little while the calls seem to start again. The junk mail isn't so bad as he just leaves all that on the side in the kitchen for me to see at the moment, that's unless he decides to hide it on top of the unit in the dining room which happened recently!


    Janice
     
  5. katieberesford

    katieberesford Registered User

    May 5, 2005
    114
    south wales
    I've encountered something different this week, but in other ways very similar to the situation others have commented on!

    My computer at home took poorly and I had arranged for a young local chap to call round to have a look at it at 4pm Monday afternoon, when I would be back home from work.

    Unfortunately, he came early (3.15pm) and I missed him. I didn't tell my hubby that the computer chap was popping round because I thought I would be back. Long and short of it all is that David let him in without asking for ID etc and then proceeded to carry on collecting leaves from the garden (he does this one leaf at a time can you believe).

    Computer chap was left alone to fix the computer and he said anyone could have come in and taken whatever they liked because David didn't seem at all bothered by him coming in the house. I blame myself for not insisting on the computer chap coming at the arranged time but was shocked by how vulnerable David is at home.

    In future I will arrange for everyone to come at weekends, but I do fear for our home and David while I am away.

    Again, the question of being at work/home has reared its ugly head. What shall I do?

    I know that everyone is going through this, but only when it happens to you and yours does it bring it home to you.

    Katiex
     
  6. allylee

    allylee Registered User

    Feb 28, 2005
    180
    west mids
    Hi Katie, I had a similiar situation with my mum, the days Im not at work I pop round 4-5 times per day, but I work 3 long days per week, and although I ring several times , Im very aware of her vulnerability. I love and need my job, it creates some balance and focus in my very unpredictable world. My mums CPN has been brilliant and has provided us with a social carer , who pops in , not to administer care, but to have a chat for an hour, take her out in the car , if she wants to go, and to make sure shes ok, while im at work.Its certainly put my mind at rest.
    Ally xx
     
  7. connie

    connie Registered User

    Mar 7, 2004
    9,519
    Frinton-on-Sea
    Hi Katie, I was in the bath the other afternoon. Knock on the door, Lionel doesn't usually hear but he went to answer it. Less than 5 mins later I asked Lionel who was knocking. "I don't know - did someone knock".

    It transpired that a gentleman had just handed Lionel a large envelope and said "please give this to Connie".

    Lionel had undone the envelope, scattered the papers around the kitchen, but had no recollection of the event.

    What is the answer to all this. Connie
     
  8. Brucie

    Brucie Registered User

    Jan 31, 2004
    12,413
    near London
    There is no answer, really.

    A lot of it is having to fly blind with fingers and toes crossed that we'll get through each day safely.

    In time to come, he won't be able to do these things and by then, you will wish he would.

    In this case, possibly locking the door might help, but it might also make things worse. If you were to lock the front door, he might panic.

    I remember taking Jan out in the car for a short trip to the local village, late on, and I left her in the car. I was gone into the shop only for 3 minutes but when I came out there was someone peering into the car window. Jan was banging against the door and shouting for help. I had to reassure him, and I never took her out in the car again after that.

    It is a bu**er, isn't it?
     
  9. Sally

    Sally Registered User

    Mar 16, 2004
    114
    London
    helpful website

    Here is the website you can use to try to prevent unsolicited mail and calls:

    http://www.mpsonline.org.uk/mpsr/

    Legally, under trading laws, a contract to purchase is only valid if both parties understand the contract they are entering into. Therefore if people find that they know someone with dementia who has ordered something they do not need or is obviously something of a con, then as long as they return the item they do not have to pay for it, arguing that the contract is rendered invalid due to incapacity. Of course, if the company decided to pursue the issue through the courts it would help if there was an enduring power of attorney registered or receivership order current to demonstrate that the person lacked capacity to make financial decisions at the time.

    Hope this helps,

    Sally
    x x x x

    Ps If you use the search box and use 'junk' then you will find another thread on this from a while ago which may be helpful too.
     

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